Claremont killer trial LIVE: Homicide detective reveals 'pure act of compassion' carried out during Jane's post-mortem
https://www.watoday.com.au/national/western-australia/claremont-killer-trial-live-forensic-officer-to-be-cross-examined-by-defence-20200114-p53rbs.html
By Heather McNeill
January 14, 2020 

January 14, 2020  6.06pm
Judge releases map of areas scoured by TRG in the weeks after bodies were discovered
map of areas scoured by TRG in the weeks after where Jane's body was found body was discovered
Former Macro taskforce detective Robert Kays was responsible for the search operations for the surrounding areas where Jane’s body was found. This photo indicates where searches were carried out.CREDIT:
map of areas scoured by TRG in the weeks after where Ciara's body was found body was discovered

Former Macro taskforce detective Robert Kays was responsible for the search operations for the surrounding areas where Ciara’s body was found. This photo indicates where searches were carried out.CREDIT:

January 14, 2020  4.10pm

Court has wrapped up for the day

Justice Stephen Hall has agreed to release the maps drawn on by Mr Kays that indicate the areas his TRG team searched in the days and weeks after the discoveries of Jane and Ciara's bodies. 
The images will be posted to this blog when they are made available.


Court will resume at 10am tomorrow with a new witness, then-Senior Constable Hyde, a member of the forensic team who examined Ciara's body in situ.  

January 14, 2020  4.06pm

'The homicide squad drove sedans': Homicide detective
Ms Barbagallo, during her reexamination of Ms Young has asked what car she drove at the time of the murders. 
She has replied the homicide squad drove either Ford or Holden sedans. 
The state alleges fibres found on Jane and Ciara's body were from a Holden Commodore station wagon. 
Ms Young has completed giving her evidence. 

January 14, 2020  4.02pm

Homicide detective wore navy suit to Jane's crime scene
Ms Cleary is now showing Ms Young a photo of her taken on the day Jane's body was found where she is pointing into the bushland. 
It shows her wearing a navy suit and black high heels with her hair tied back into a ponytail.
The state alleges a single blue polyester fibre found in Jane's hair is from the custom-made Telstra-issued navy trousers Mr Edwards wore for work at the time. 

A photograph of Woolcoot Road, Wellard where Jane's body was found in bushland just off the road.


January 14, 2020 3.56pm

Homicide detective pushes back after defence suggests she entered Jane's crime scene
Ms Cleary is now cross-examining Ms Young and asking her whether she entered the bushland alcove where Jane's body was found. 
Ms Cleary: It wasn't possible to see the body from the road was it?
Ms Young: Yes. 
Ms Cleary: Can I suggest you had to take at least one step, maybe two into the bush to see the body?
Ms Young: I can categorically tell you as a member of the homicide squad, I not only knew better but I would never enter a crime scene, ever.
Sensitive footage of Jane's crime scene is now being shown where the body cannot be seen from the road, or a couple of steps into the bush. 
"The footage appears very dark in there. My recollection is being able to crouch down and peer through those bushes and seeing what was a human form," Ms Young said. 
The bushland where Jane Rimmer’s body was found, as seen from the road.

January 14, 2020 3.47pm

'I attended each post-mortem for continuity': Homicide detective
Mr Young attended the mortuary again later that day for a further examination of Jane's body. She also attended another examination two days later on August 6. 
She said she attended the examinations for continuity purposes. 
The examinations were not filmed, and Ms Young cannot recall what she was wearing during them, but said she would have likely been wearing scrubs or a white surgical coat over her business attire. 
She said she wouldn't have been wearing a hair net or gloves. 

January 14, 2020 3.43pm
Homicide detective reveals 'pure act of compassion' carried out during Jane's post-mortem
Ms Young is now recalling a piece of Jane's hair given to her by Dr Margolius. 
"In the theatre there was a stage where Dr Margolius took a clump of Jane's hair, she washed it in the trough and then that was given to me at the end of the post-mortem," she said. 
"That piece of hair was provided to me. I took that piece of hair home and I shampooed it and washed it, I then brushed it, put a lacky band around it and placed it in a gift box to give to the family so they had a memory of Jane.
"It was purely provided to me out of an act of kindness and compassion to the family."
Fibres found in Jane's hair make up the only forensic evidence ithe state alleges links Mr Edwards to the crime. 
 
Jane Rimmer's funeral
Jane Rimmer’s parents and sister at her funeral in 1996.


January 14, 2020 3.34pm
'There was a significant neck injury discovered during Jane's post-mortem': Homicide detective
Ms Young is now recalling the post-mortem conducted on Jane's body the following morning. 
"My role was to be present throughout the post-mortem to record information provided to us so it could be relayed to the inquiry team and continue with the continuity of being present with Jane," she said. 
"On that day within the actual mortuary theatre I was wearing a brand new set of hospital scrubs and wellington boots provided by Dr Margolius.
"There was no need for me to wear gloves because I had no contact with the body."
Ms Young said she wore the clothing to prevent contamination, and to prevent her own clothes from being contaminated with the odour so she could return to work later in her own clothes. 
During the post-mortem, Ms Young said the first step was for Dr Margolius to remove Jane's jewellery and place it in a tub. 
She said Jane was wearing a ring on each hand, a naval ring, earrings and a necklace. 
"The neck chain, Jane had a significant neck injury and the chain was still present but had fallen to the back and was behind her hair," she said. 
She said her earrings were located in her hair and behind her arm. 
Ms Young is now recalling the injuries noted to Jane's body during the post-mortem. 
"There were injuries to the throat, there was injuries to the end of digits," Ms Young recalled. 
"There was a significant wound to the neck."
A sketch showing a female body and notations of jewellery and injuries is being shown in court. 
The document says "no broken bones" and marks the neck as "missing". 
Some fingers and toes are also marked as missing or hanging.
An indentation was noted to the right wrist. 
 

January 14, 2020  3.10 pm

Mr Edwards taking glasses off when graphic images shown

A courtroom sketch of Bradley Edwards, drawn on the first day of his murder trial.
During the past two days of the trial, accused man Mr Edwards has at times taken his glasses off while sensitive images and footage are being shown. 
He has taken his glasses off as the photos of Jane's body in the mortuary are being shown for the first time. 
He is resting his cheek on his hand and writing notes. 

January 14, 2020 3.07pm
'We had two families on hold waiting to know whether it was their daughter who had been found'
After Jane's body was removed from the Wellard scene, it was taken to the state mortuary, where Ms Young also attended that night. 
"We had two families on hold that night waiting to know whether it was their daughter we'd found so the primary duty that night was to try and do identification," she said. 
"Dr Stephen Knott was present at the mortuary that evening ... and he made attempts to contact Jane's dentist and they were unsuccessful. 
"Arrangements had been made for Sarah's dental records which I believe were held by the inquiry team to be delivered to the mortuary that evening.
"Dr Knott was able to examine with the records that were Sarah's and was able to tell us that evening that it was definitely not Sarah."

Sarah's body has never been found. 

Ms Young is now recalling Jane's body was x-rayed for Dr Knott to review the dental structure. 
She said he also partially unzipped the body bag and examined Jane's facial area for a short time. 
She is now being shown photos she took of the body being examined. 


There were over fifty fibers found on JRs body. They lifted them with adhesive tape. That's an unusual amount of fibers on a body.

Canning Vale, Dec 9, 2017
https://www.websleuths.com/forums/threads/australia-claremont-serial-killer-1996-1997-perth-western-australia-19.358426/page-5

Thanks CV, : News article

Natasha Tracey-Ann Kendrick leaves court. 

http://www.websleuths.com/forums/showthread.php?p=12278173
Post #959 jan 8th 2016 thread #3
Sutton posted :
From the Post, Two new clues to serial killer, Dec 12, 2015:
"In addition, fibers found on Jane Rimmer's naked body in 1996 that were "lost" and then rediscovered in 2011 were found to match the upholstery of a Holden VS Commodore, which was near-new at the time she was abducted...
...Fifty fibers lifted with adhesive tape from Jane Rimmer's body lay in a file until 2004 when [the Schramm Review] discovered that the fibers had never been tested against other crimes or vehicles...Detective Schramm described the discovery as exciting.."

meticulously, Dec 9, 2017

As the fibers were seemingly placed on JRs body in clumps, perhaps there was blood in the car, and the CSK whoever he may, finger-plucked the bloodied clumps from the carpet and placed them on JRs body to get rid of the evidence. I can't think why else they'd be on JR in large quantities. He wanted his car left clean.
Perhaps he used a different vehicle to transport CG. A vehicle without carpet

.Canning Vale, Dec 9, 2017

Amazing how in this case, the Rayney case, the Hayley Dodd case the police had the evidence in a bag the whole time and it was just never tested or noticed that it existed. That is until many years down the track when the case is reviewed and all of a sudden this evidence turns up.... and it always fits in with WAPOL’s best interests as to the person they charge. Usually the main suspect since day 1. Call me cynical.
Sent from my iPhone using TapatalkKambo, Dec 9, 2017

I thought maybe two scenarios that the back seat might have been folded back to hide the body if stopped by the police or the attack occurred in the back seat.

DRT, Dec 9, 2017
When you really think about it, WAPOL are a government department (GD). Has anyone ever sent something to a GD and it’s been mislaid? For example, when sending Australia Post mail to Centrelink, there’s almost a guarantee that the paperwork will get lost – so we hand-deliver the item. Perhaps WAPOLs evidence processing system is similar to Centrelink

.Canning Vale, Dec 9, 2017
Yes DRT, hiding the body under the seats would make sense. It would be possible to lay the three back seats down, if the VS Commodore is similar to the VE Commodore - I've included an image of a VE.
It makes sense that a body be placed within the void behind the two front seats - and the three rear seats flattened as per sample image.....
A lot of wriggling would cause the fibers to dislodge and cling onto her body - which means she was still alive, at that stage.
https://www.netcarshow.com/holden/2008-ve_commodore_sportwagon/
Attached Files:: Commodore.jpg
231Canning Vale, Dec 9, 2017

Why hasn't the DPP  for Western Australia presented all material evidence and witnesses at the trial of Bradley Edwards
Why hasn't Carmel Barbagallo-the senior Director of Public prosecutions for Western Australia  and head Prosecutor of Bradley Robert Edwards
brought the witness that saw a taxi at the scene of where the body of Ciara Glennon was found in dense bushland 45kms north of Perth. 

The taxi had its headlights off as it turned off Pipidinny Rd, Eglinton, on to Wanneroo Rd in the pre-dawn darkness, the Two Rocks resident told The Sunday Times.

He said he had to hit his brakes to avoid hitting it.
Claremont serial killer: Taxi clue to Ciara Glennon’s death...  It seems like Carmel Barbagallo is doing what Ken Bates did in the Andrew Mallard Trial . .by .only showing the court the evidence and witnesses that fits into a claim by the Police and DPP  for Western Australia that Bradley Robert Edwards was the sole person responsible for the abduction and murder of Sarah Spiers, Jane Rimmer and Ciara Glennon. This evidence fits in with information given by Sarah McMahon, as well as  Noel Geoffrey Coward who was interviewed by the Special Crime Squad in December 18 2014 at Curtin House.  For many years Noel Geoffrey Coward has been urging police to look closely at a former taxi driver from Fremantle known as ''Taxi Tony' and a girl called 'Michelle' being involved in the Claremont Serial Killings  which included information the girls went missing to make snuff movies sold for large money overseas, who  he brought to the police's attention after the abduction and murder of Ciara Glennon in 1997.. “Primarily I don’t trust them,” he said. “... because they had not, in my opinion, investigated the original evidence I supplied...".. stated Noel Geoffrey Coward ...it seems that the police did not want to arrest anyone for the Claremont Serial Killings until Sarah Anne McMahon and Noel Geoffrey Coward  died or disappeared  ...it is noted the girl Andrew Mallard stayed within Mosman Park was called Michelle... who lived in a flat near where the screams were heard the night Sarah Spiers disappeared ... who needs to be interviewed by the police  in regards to her whereabouts on the night Sarah Glennon disappeared and whether Michelle also heard the screams, as Michelle lived in Monument Street, Mosman Park near where the screams were heard from ... Noel Geoffrey Coward stated that every time one of the girls disappeared Michelle travelled to Eastern States for a while ...  

https://www.perthnow.com.au/news/wa/claremont-serial-killer-taxi-clue-to-ciara-glennons-death-ng-b80af943b3f4b839a9956cdffd1aa3ab

JOHN FLINT- PerthNow -January 3, 2015

 ​http://www.perthnow.com.au/news/western-australia/claremont-serial-killings-wa-police-quiz-new-people-request-dna-samples/story-fnhocxo3-1227168035093 

JOHN FLINT, PerthNow 

December 27, 2014 ....

also why hasn't  former Assistant Police Commissioner David John Caporn and retired Inspector Ferguson, been called on to the witness stand in the trial of Bradly Robert Edwards as they are both clearly material witnesses being previous heads of the Macro Task Force 

Final civilian witnesses to take the stand - Claremont serial killings trial
AAP - December 16, 2019 


https://www.perthnow.com.au/news/claremont-serial-killings/claremont-serial-killings-trial-final-civilian-witnesses-to-take-stand-ng-b881412281z

The final civilian witnesses are about to be heard in the Claremont serial killings trial, with DNA and fibre evidence set to dominate next year’s hearings.
The Western Australia Supreme Court last week heard the lengthy proceedings had progressed faster than expected, so will not sit
on Thursday and Friday, as previously scheduled, before a two-week festive season recess.
When the trial returns on January 6, expert witnesses will be called.

Physical evidence is central to the case against Bradley Robert Edwards, a former Telstra technician and Little Athletics coach.
Prosecutors say his DNA was found on a silk kimono he left behind after attacking a sleeping woman in her Huntingdale home in 1988, and on a teenager he abducted and raped in a cemetery in 1995 - crimes he confessed to in October.

They also say his DNA was recovered from under Ciara Glennon’s fingernails.

But he maintains he didn’t kill the 27-year-old solicitor in 1997, and 18-year- old secretary Sarah Spiers and 23-year-old Jane Rimmer in 1996.

Fibre evidence is another major part of the prosecution case.
It is alleged fibres from his Telstra-issued trousers were found on Ms Rimmer and Ms Glennon, who were dumped in bushland at opposite ends of Perth, and on the rape victim.
Prosecutors also say fibres from the same make and model as Edwards’ work car were found on Ms Rimmer and Ms Glennon.
They argue the seriousness of Edwards’ offending escalated over time and the murders coincided with key moments in the breakdown of his first marriage, which unravelled after he became distant and his wife had an affair.
The 51-year-old also has a conviction for attacking a woman at Hollywood Hospital in 1990.
The defence has suggested some DNA exhibits were contaminated and fibre evidence may also be tainted.

Jane Rimmer’s parents and sister at her funeral in 1996.

This article came out the day after Ross called the radio station about the night he had SS in his taxi. It is the only time I've seen a description of the man who got out of the taxi with Sarah. The handsome blonde man.
Also, the article quotes a witness identifying a blonde man seen talking to Jane Rimmer in the cctv footage the night she disappears, as looking like the blonde man offering to give her (the witness) a lift home the night before Ciara disappeared from St Quentin's Ave.
I think I missed what you were talking about with 700 people. Could you please explain that?
[[​IMG]]
Attached Files:
Theories.JPG
198Innerchild, Dec 17, 2017

https://www.websleuths.com/forums/threads/australia-claremont-serial-killer-1996-1997-perth-western-australia-19.358426/page-8

Ciara Glennon was drunk but in control, court told- Claremont Serial Killings Trial
AAP
December 13, 2019

https://www.perthnow.com.au/news/claremont-serial-killings/claremont-serial-killings-trial-ciara-glennon-was-drunk-but-in-control-court-told-ng-b881410423z

The third Claremont murders victim was drunk but “very in control” before she left a pub and was never seen alive again, her alleged killer’s trial has heard.
Ciara Glennon had been back in Perth a fortnight after spending almost a year travelling when she was either abducted or lured from the affluent suburb’s entertainment strip, killed and dumped in bushland in 1997.
Workmate Abigail Davies, 48, said their law firm had St Patrick’s Day drinks in the boardroom on March 14 and a small group ended up going to the Continental Hotel.

Ms Glennon was captured on CCTV entering the venue but police have not found any other footage of her that night.

“She appeared relaxed and happy,” Ms Davies told the Western Australia Supreme Court trial of ex-Telstra technician Bradley Robert Edwards on Thursday.
At one stage, Ms Glennon “wandered off” for about 20 minutes and later chatted with a group of around five people Ms Davies didn’t know.
She briefly rejoined her colleagues then left on her own at about 11.45pm.
“She just said to me ‘I’m going’. She moved away from the group without really saying goodbye as such,” Ms Davies said.
“She was exuberant... she was drunk but she was very in control of everything about her person.”

Her parents Una and Denis Glennon initially weren’t overly concerned when their worldly 27-year-old didn’t return home but became increasingly worried when they learnt she had gone to the Continental.

Jane Rimmer, 23, was last seen at the hotel in 1996 and Sarah Spiers, 18, vanished from the area earlier that year.

Police told Mr Glennon his daughter’s body had been found just over a fortnight after she disappeared and he had to break the devastating news to his wife.

Also on Thursday, people who lived in the semi-rural suburb where Ms Rimmer’s body was found testified they heard a loud scream and a “very high-pitched and traumatic voice of a woman” shouting words to the effect of: “Leave me alone! Let me out of here!“

Inspector Paul Ferguson,-Former Macro Taskforce boss, who was suddenly removed from being the boss of the Macro Task Force, when he stated publicly the the Claremont Serial Killer or Killers could be a Police Officer, a Taxi Driver, a Security Guard, or someone appearing to be one of these, and/or a well respected person, and asked for any possible theories to be provided ... it appears that there was a concern that  Inspector Paul Ferguson,-Former Macro Task Force boss, was getting to close to the truth and for that reason was quickly replaced by David John Caporn-who later because the Assistant Western Australian Police Commissioner... .David John Caporn was later forced to resign as a Western Australian Police Officer after being accused of helping the Western Australian Director of Public Prosecutions provide misleading evidence to have Andrew Mallard  wrongly convicted of the murder of Pamela Lawrence.
Andrew Mallard spent 12 years in jail for a murder he didn't commit.

Claremont serial killings trial podcast: ‘The Huntingdale Attack’
PerthNow
December 6, 2019 11:59AM

https://www.perthnow.com.au/news/claremont-serial-killings/claremont-serial-killings-trial-podcast-the-huntingdale-attack-ng-b881404644z

On Valentine’s Day in 1988 in Huntingdale, a teenager went to bed alone after spending the day with her boyfriend.She was woken up by someone lying on top of her.
Thinking it was her boyfriend, she said she didn’t feel scared. That was until she touched that person’s face. The person lying on top of her wasn’t her boyfriend, but was an intruder.
That intruder was Bradley Robert Edwards, who pleaded guilty to the attack 30 years later.
Day 10 of the Claremont Serial Killings trial heard from victim, as she told of her ordeal, and of the kimono that was left behind after the attack.
That kimono would become crucial in the police investigation, and the prosecution’s case against Bradley Edwards.
The day also heard from the family of the second woman to disappear, Jane Rimmer, and the ordinary day that would turn out to be her last.
Join Natalie Bonjolo, Tim Clarke and Alison Fan as they dissect the day’s events.

David John Caporn-Former Assistant Western Australian Police Commissioner-who was previously in charge of the Macro Task Force set up to  investigate the Claremont Serial Abductions and Killings, 
​David John Caporn-Former Assistant Western Australian Police Commissioner-who was previously in charge of the Macro Task Force set up to  investigate the Claremont Serial Abductions and Killings,  had to quickly resign from the Western Australian Police Force to stop an internal police investigation into his involvement senior DPP Prosecutor Kenneth Bates, in the presentation of misleading evidence and withholding material evidence at the trial of Andrew Mallard. 

A photograph of Woolcoot Road, Wellard where Jane's body was found in bushland just off the road.

Hi CV - thanks for posting the picture of the VE Commodore. Yes you can definitely see how a victim could be trapped underneath the back seat. Especially in the dark it wouldn’t be noticed if the seat was raised a little because someone was underneath.He would have to have rendered his victims unconscious or tied them up in some way to prevent them from moving around.

MOOAnnalise, Dec 15, 2017

As detailed in the West Australian 22 March 1997 reporting on the phone call Ross had made to the ABC about that night,

Ross reported a handsome, well dressed blonde-haired man sharing the cab with Sarah.
This description is quite different to the one in the article the witness saw her with the next morning "tall, well dressed, skinny with sharp features,

black hair, with small curls at the back"
Ross initial description was also omitted in the subsequent letter to the Post written by Ross on 04Jun16 posted by Met recently
That's one reason it makes that article so odd. Perfect description of MM though, unfortunately, we didn't know about him

for another 3 years. 700 people did though apparently, although some described him as blonde there too. I can't make heads or tails of any of the article

.no name, Dec 16, 2017

Why we didn't catch the Claremont killer
The former head of the Western Australian Police task-force responsible for catching the notorious Claremont killer has spoken out about the investigation that never hit its mark.
au.news.yahoo.com
shellyg Spec Moderator Jul 15, 2019
31st May 2015. It seems WA Police and Bayens are in disagreement.

​Read the statement from WA Police
Sunday Night•31 May 2015
Sunday Night received this response from WA Police regarding Con Bayen's evidence, which he claims was disregarded by the Macro Taskforce:


​The information from officer Bayens was received and Macro investigators at the time, and since, have made thorough follow-up inquiries. This was a case of an officer doing exactly what was requires. The matter was found not be to connected to the Macro inquiry. Throughout the investigation, detectives have examined tens of thousands of pieces of information, interviewed more than 10,000 people and followed countless lines of inquiry. Work done in the past has provided potential avenues of inquiry later and even today. Throughout its history, Marco has deliberately sustained a broad focus and not been limited in its scope at any point.

​Response from Con Bayens:

I remain the same and totally deny that I was ever given any result of my information.
To be sure, I can only say that David Caporn was running the Macro Taskforce when I passed on the information in respect to the guy I intercepted in Highgate. The Macro Taskforce was staffed like any other Police Operation with staff seconded from other areas of the Police Force
The prostitution Taskforce that I operated ran between July 2000 - August 2002.
Regards
​Con

​Second Police Statement from WA Media Head, Neil Stanbury:

Former Senior Constable Com Beyers submitted a general field report relating to the activities of a male person resulting from an unrelated 2002 operation into prostitution. 
The District Intelligence Officer assessing field reports for the policing area brought the field report to the attention of the Macro Task Force and it was immediately actioned for investigation. This was a common practice in respect to  filed reports submitted by patrol officers.
Response from Con Bayens:​
Thank you for your call today in which you advised that the WA Police has made an additional response that I had been advised of the result of the information I provided to the Marco Investigation.
I remain the same and totally deny that I was ever given any result of my information.
Regards
Con Bayens
​​

Detective tells Claremont trial he hoped for a second grim discovery at Jane Rimmer crime scene
By Charlotte Hamlyn

14th January 2020
https://www.abc.net.au/news/2020-01-14/claremont-serial-killings-trial-told-ciara-glennon-body-evidence/11863364
Police who investigated the Claremont serial killings held out hope for a second grim discovery when they were called to the site where Jane Rimmer's body was found, the WA Supreme Court has been told.

Key points:
Bradley Edwards has pleaded not guilty to murdering three women in 1996 and 1997
His lawyers are questioning how police gathered evidence at two bush grave sites
A former officer says DNA contamination was not a big concern at the time

Former Macro Task Force detective Robert Kays on Tuesday gave evidence at the trial of Bradley Robert Edwards, who is accused of killing Sarah Spiers, 18, Ms Rimmer, 23, and Ciara Glennon, 27.
The women all disappeared from the Perth suburb of Claremont between 1996 and 1997, purportedly at the hands of a serial killer, but Edwards denies having anything to do with their deaths.
Mr Kays worked for Macro — the biggest police investigation in Australian history, which was set up after Ms Rimmer became the second woman to disappear from Claremont.
When her body was found in bushland at Wellard, south of Perth, he coordinated a broad search of the area in the hope that Ms Spiers's body may also be located.

Mr Kays told the court officers were instructed to walk in a straight line "body to body" looking for anything that might be related to either woman.
"Obviously Sarah hadn't been located then so that was a major interest," he said.
"With the utmost respect for the Spiers family, I don't think we would have located a body. We were looking for a pelvic bone, maybe a skull, teeth."
"Jane's clothing had been removed so those items were of interest as well."
He said numerous searches were conducted over two to three weeks, including by police divers who examined nearby waterways, but their efforts were fruitless.
"We looked hard but found nothing," he said.
Ms Spiers's body has never been located.
Lock of hair given to Rimmer family
Another homicide detective, Vicky Young, recalled the moment at the Wellard crime scene when detectives realised the body in the bushland was likely Ms Rimmer.

"We could clearly see a bellybutton ring, which I had known was a piece of jewellery that Jane wore," she said.
"From then we knew we were looking at the possibility of having found and located Jane."
The detective went to the state mortuary where Ms Rimmer's post-mortem examination was conducted.
"We had two families on hold that night waiting to know whether it was their daughter we'd found so the primary duty that night was to try and do identification," she said.
The detective told the court how she was given a lock of the victim's hair which she took home, washed and put in a gift box to give to the Rimmer family as an act of compassion.

Police may have stepped on Ciara Glennon's body
A former forensic police officer earlier admitted he may have inadvertently touched or even trodden on Ms Glennon's body as it lay in a bush grave, as forensic handling of the case continues to come under scrutiny.
Barry Mott was a sergeant working in the WA Police Forensic Unit in 1996 and 1997, when the bodies of Ms Rimmer and Ms Glennon were found dumped at remote bush sites at opposite ends of the city.
Under questioning from defence lawyer Paul Yovich SC, Mr Mott said DNA technology was in its infancy at the time and was not a prominent consideration for police officers attending crime scenes.
"You didn't go to a scene thinking you could potentially contaminate it without even touching it?" Mr Yovich asked the witness.
"Definitely not," Mr Mott replied.
Space to play or pause, M to mute, left and right arrows to seek, up and down arrows for volume.Moving body 'quite difficult', court told

He was then asked specifically about the area of bushland in Eglinton, north of Perth, where Ms Glennon's body was found by a member of the public off a narrow limestone track, three weeks after her disappearance from Claremont.

Mr Mott was responsible for collecting exhibits from that scene as well as helping to lift her body out of the bushland.
He was asked about the precautions he took to avoid disturbing the body and the vegetation around it.
Did you knowingly step on anything that might be an exhibit?" Mr Yovich asked.
"You didn't knowingly step on Ciara's body, not even her hair?"
Mr Mott said he had not done so intentionally, but it was possible he had inadvertently.
"You're treading carefully, you're trying to be respectful and do your job. Obviously, you've got to get close to the deceased or the body," Mr Mott said.
"I honestly can't recall whether I stepped on it.
"Trying to move a deceased body is quite difficult, especially one in that condition."

Skirt sample not recorded on police system
Mr Mott was also responsible for couriering some of the Eglinton crime scene exhibits from WA's PathWest lab to the ChemCentre on April 9, 1997.
When asked why one of those exhibits, a sample taken from Ms Glennon's skirt, was not recorded on the police property tracing system, he conceded it was likely an oversight on his behalf.
Mr Yovich said while that particular exhibit was not considered critical, it was transferred alongside other critical material.
He indicated that its omission from the system spoke to the processes undertaken by police to move evidence from one place to another.
It is a key argument of Edwards's defence team that DNA found under Ciara Glennon's fingernail was contaminated inside the state's pathology lab with DNA from the 1995 rape of a teenage girl at Karrakatta Cemetery, which Edwards admitted to ahead of his trial.
His lawyers have attempted to cast doubt over police processes and to identify opportunities for cross-contamination to have occurred.

Trial hears graphic details of rape victim's injuries
On Monday, graphic details of the injuries suffered by the 17-year-old girl violently raped twice by Edwards were detailed in court by a doctor who examined her in the hours after her protracted ordeal.

The girl had been walking home from a night out in Claremont on February 12, 1995, when Edwards grabbed her while she walked past some bushes on her way through a poorly-lit park and threw her to the ground.
He bound her hands and feet together, stuffed thick cloth into her mouth and put a hood over her head, before bundling her into his work van and driving her to Karrakatta Cemetery, where he dragged her through dirt and raped her twice.
Former Sexual Assault Resource Centre on-call doctor Amanda Barbara told the court she remembered the assault 25 years later because of "the violent nature of the assault by a stranger, the fact that she had been hooded and restrained, the extent and painfulness of her injuries".

As annotated avatar-style drawings of a female figure were shown on court screens, Dr Barnard described the girl's injuries, which included bruises and abrasions on her arms and legs, red scratch marks and unusual injuries on her upper arm.
"It was an unusual sort of injury and it looked like it had been made by something sharp," she said.

"I could think that it could have been some sort of scratch marks … made by something sharp."
Dr Barnard said the teenager had a sore left wrist and her arm was "very swollen and tender from the middle of her forearm tight down to the mid palm."
Pain and tenderness in her left thumb remained for some time, Dr Barnard said, and was mentioned by the girl at subsequent medical appointments.
The trial, before Justice Stephen Hall, is continuing.

PHOTO: The three victims of the Claremont serial killings (clockwise from top) Sarah Spiers, Jane Rimmer and Ciara Glennon. (ABC News: Liam Phillips)
PHOTO: Bradley Edwards denies murdering Sarah Spiers, Jane Rimmer and Ciara Glennon. (ABC News: Anne Barnetson)
clothing had been removed so those items were of interest as well."
PHOTO: Former detective Robert Kays worked for the Macro Task Force, the police unit that investigated the Claremont killings. (ABC News: Hugh Sando)
PHOTO: Homicide detective Vicky Young was one of the first police officers to visit the site where Jane Rimmer's body lay. (ABC News: Hugh Sando)
PHOTO: Ciara Glennon's body was found in Eglinton three weeks after her disappearance. (ABC News)
PHOTO: Barry Mott said it was possible he had inadvertently stepped on Ms Glennon's body. (ABC News: Hugh Sando)
PHOTO: Edwards's lead defence counsel, Paul Yovich, is attempting cast doubt over police processes. (ABC News: Hugh Sando)

PHOTO: Edwards has pleaded guilty to raping a teenage girl at Karrakatta Cemetery in 1995. (Supplied: Supreme Court of WA)


 "... The historical evidence clearly shows the 1960's, 1970's, 1980's and 1990's and also to some extent from the year 2000 onwards, has been a period in Perth, Western Australia where there was deeply rooted endemic police corruption, where well connected powerful Western Australian senior police,  such the late Bernie Johnson and the late Don Hancock,, plus many police who are still amongst the living, who were  part of what was known as the "Purple Circle", were involved in profiting in from criminal activity, who could easily get away with the most serious crimes, including murder, and who gave the Police Green Light to certain people to be able to commit any crime without fear of criminal investigation and/or prosecution, knowing that they would be protected by senior police in the Purple Circle  from their criminal activities being exposed. Besides all the private NYT's Investigation Files it has been publicly stated in open inquiries such as Inquest into the murder of  Brothel Madame, the late Shirley Finn, that senior Western Australian police officers the late Bernie Johnson and the late Don Hancock, were involved in the murder of Brothel Madame, the late Shirley Finn, as well as being in involved with profiting from illegal earnings made from prostitution income .... ....for instance the billionaire building magnate, the late Len Buckeridge committed assault on Ron Minshull on the driveway at 135 Glyde Street, Mosman Park in front of three witnesses and obvious and easily provable perjury in the Magistrates Court at a restraining order application, however Detective John Hancock stated that his senior officers would not allow Len Buckeridge to be arrested under any circumstances for any criminal offences....an inspector whom Ron Minshull visited to demand that the late Len Buckeridge be arrested for hitting Ron Minshull on the back of the head a hot rake, after serving a witness summons on Len Buckeridge, told Ron Mitshull and his friend that the only action the inspector  was prepared to take was '....I will ring Len at home tonight and tell Len to behave himself and not to hit anyone else again....'... one   of the late  Len Buckeridge's stand over employees stated his boss 'Len Buckeridge' was the most powerful man in Western Australia who could ring the then Western Australian Police Commissioner, Robert Falconer, up at 3 am any morning, and tell the Police Commissioner to jump ... and the Police Commission would have to reply ....' Len where do you want me to jump and how high!!!......."

An insider in Perth's Italian Criminal World who worked for the late Sam Franchina, known at the time as Perth's Italian Catholic Godfather, stated that the then Western Australian Police Commissioner, Robert Falconer (June 1994 to June 1999) arranged for convicted drug dealer Paolo Mussari who received a 15 year prison sentence in the 1980's for illegal drug importation,  an early prison release for for Paolo Mussari, so that Paolo Mussari could run a large illegal drug business for those that the then Western Australian Police Commissioner worked for, and worked with .. .then when Robert Falconer was about end his contract as the Western Australian Police Commissioner, ....he had Paolo Mussari arrested again for running a multi million illegal drug empire...After having regular Sunday barbeques, where Robert Falconer and his family and Paolo Mussari and his family were present (it is understood very conveniently were both living in the same street of the exclusive Perth beachside suburb of City Beach...... also it is noted that during Paolo Mussari's drug dealing charge trial in the 1980's .... hot headed Italian-Sicilian-born Paolo "Paul" Mussari jumped up while in the accused court dock, and pointed at the police detectives sitting in the front row of the court, who were the police detectives that arrested Paul Mussari for illegal drug dealing and yelled ... '... I accept and admit my business is dealing in illegal drugs, however these detectives have been my business partners for years in my illegal drug dealing business, so why aren't these police detectives charged with me for illegal drug dealing?.... ' ... of course the mainstream media reporters sitting in the court were never allowed to report this in West Australian Newspaper, the Sunday Times and/or on any the television networks.. .....it is in this background in mind ,that, investigations into the Claremont Serial Killings should and must be completed and understood .... how a number of attempted rapes, actual rapes, abductions and murders of females could happen over a 20 plus year period, in a fairly small close-knit-community of Perth, Western Australia where it would have been almost impossible for a number of serious crimes such abductions and murders, large scale illegal drug dealing to be happening without a number of people knowing including one or more of the police involved with the Criminal World having a reasonable idea who is either behind and/or involved in such serious criminal activities ... it seems rather odd and bizare that  Bradley Robert Edwards, being a self confessed attempted rapist in 1990 was not immediately flagged up as a likely person of interest when Sarah Spiers vanished into thin air, then flagged up again when Jane Rimmer disappeared .... then again when Ciara Glennon disappeared " ....the NYT Investigation Team

Violent attacker is suspect in murders
LUKE ELIOT
Monday, November 07, 2011

A street prostitute who narrowly survived a brutal bashing at the hands of a sexual deviant who is suspected of being involved in two unsolved suspected murders says she is still haunted by the chilling attack and believes her assailant may have killed other women.
In her first media interview since the December 2003 attack, the woman, who did not want her name published, described crawling through a swamp and scaling a 2.4m high concrete wall in a bid to escape.
"I know there are other girls who aren't as lucky as I was," the woman said.
In September 2005, career criminal Donald Victor Morey was convicted after trial of attempted murder.
In handing down a 13-year jail term, Supreme Court Justice Geoffrey Miller accepted the prosecutor's submission that there was no sexual motive to Morey's crime as he was impotent at the time.
"This woman was a random target and . . . it was predatory conduct on your part," Justice Miller said. "It was a premeditated offence, that you planned to take her to a remote area and it was not the case that you voluntarily desisted from what you were doing."
Morey's appeals were dismissed and he remains behind bars.
He is a suspect in the murder of Darylyn Meridith Ugle, a prostitute who was last seen alive while soliciting for sex in March 2003, and to the disappearance of Sarah McMahon, a 20-year-old Parkerville woman who has not been seen leaving her Claremont workplace exactly 11 years ago today. Her vehicle was found at Swan District Hospital. Morey denies involvement in both cases but admits he knew Ms McMahon.
Ms Ugle's body was found in April 2003 near Mundaring Weir - a short distance from Morey's Chidlow home and from the Helena Valley street where he took his December 2003 victim. The two prostitutes knew each other.
"We don't think it is going to happen to us but I didn't put two and two together," the prostitute who escaped said.
"I'm not a dumb girl. I have good instincts and he was good enough to make me go against my instincts."
She said she felt uneasy getting into Morey's car that night in December 2003 but accepted $900 to have sex with him.
"I think he might have panicked because I realised he was going around in circles," she said.
"He calmly pulled his car over to the side of the road and he already had rope wrapped around his hand when he turned his car off."
Morey tried to place the rope over the woman's neck but she put her back against the passenger door and repeatedly kicked him.
"I fell out backwards and hit the kerb with my back," she said.
"He dived out over the top of me and I got him in the face with my feet. I think that dazed him a little bit. I crawled to the back of the car and he followed me.
"He was punching into me for about 15 minutes and I was screaming. I climbed on to the back of his car . . . to try not to let him get me back into the car again."
The woman managed to climb a high wall and stumble through a swampy area.
"I was screaming," she said. Morey eventually got back in his car and drove off.
The woman said the attack changed her life.
"I couldn't walk out in the street at night," she said.
"If I see someone who looks like him I jump a little, even though I know he is in jail."


​DECEMBER 14 2012
McMahon mystery deepens as key statement is recanted
 Rania Spooner
The truth of what happened to 20-year-old Sarah McMahon, who vanished more than a decade ago, appears more elusive than ever after a key witness into her suspected death recanted part of a crucial statement she allegedly told police last year.
Following three police investigations spanning 12 years, an inquest was launched in Perth this week in an attempt to uncover more information about what happened to Ms McMahon.
Natasha Tracey-Ann Kendrick leaves court. 
The special crime squad of the WA Police force, tasked with investigating unsolved cases, finally appeared to have unearthed new information in November 2011.A former prostitute, who had already been interviewed twice over the disappearance, changed her version of what happened the night Ms McMahon disappeared in November 2000.Natasha Tracey-Ann Kendrick, now 50, who at the time believed she was dying from liver failure, allegedly told police she had been called to a friend's house that night and saw the body of a woman she believed was Ms McMahon.
The pair had met some weeks earlier at the same house where her friend - the homeowner - had taken on a lodger who would later be convicted of attempted murder over an unrelated case, the Coroner's Court heard.Ms McMahon who lived with her family in Parkerville in Perth's Hills, was last seen leaving her Claremont workplace on November 8, 2000.She had enrolled in a Bachelor of Arts at Murdoch University that year but by September had suspended her studies as she battled with depression and drug use, her sister Amanda Smith told the inquest.
She was also dealing with a difficult break-up, according to her sister.Through the church where her parents were long-standing members Ms McMahon had secured a part-time job working in administration - she disappeared after finishing her second shift.As she drove away from work, the last phone call Ms McMahon ever answered was from Donald Morey - a man 25 years older her senior who has since been convicted of attempting to strangle a prostitute to death, the inquest heard,At the time, Morey was living with his boss Gareth Allen in Marangaroo - although he had a home in Chidlow he shared with this de facto partner on the weekends, the Coroner's Court heard.In the statement Ms Kendrick recanted on Thursday, she had claimed she helped clean up Mr Allen's house after seeing a woman's body in Morey's room the night of Ms McMahon's disappearance.
Despite being played a secretly recorded conversation with her brother taken the day after she gave her statement in which she says her "conscience is clear" and she's "done something positive", she now maintains she never saw a body.
Ms Kendrick told the Coroner's Court she had been on drugs, and was "scared" and "confused" when she gave the statement to police last year.In his evidence, Mr Allen described the entire statement as "lies" and offered to do a lie detector test to prove he never called Ms Kendrick to his house that night and that there was never a body.He also maintains he wasn't even at home."I had it read to me by the coppers and I laughed ," Mr Allen said of the statement."I told them 'that's a beautiful story but it ain't true' "He said Morey took Ms McMahon and her sister over to Mr Allen's house on one occasion before her disappearance and had referred to her as "his new girl," he told the court.The afternoon Ms McMahon disappeared, Morey had asked to borrow a truck from Mr Allen to go and see "Sarah", Mr Allen said."That's who I presumed it was - I'm pretty sure he said Sarah or the young girl," he said."I imagine he hoped for sex."Knowing him - without a doubt."But Mr Allen maintained he never saw Ms McMahon and could not say whether the truck was returned that night.Several months after Ms McMahon's disappearance, Mr Allen's wife, Marta Allen, had contacted police about a black bag that belonged to Morey, which was discovered when he was in hospital for chest pains in March 2001, the Coroner's Court heard.Mr Allen said the bag contained graphic pornography involving people "dressed up like they were dead" that he "could not even look at".It also contained gaffer tape, rope and knives, he said."Marta came to me and said I need to go to the police and I told her to follow her heart," he said.But before the police came to look at the bag - days later - Morey's partner had come and taken it away, he said.

Morey, who is currently serving 13 years jail for attempted murder, is expected to give evidence on Friday.He has consistently denied any knowledge of what happened to Ms McMahon. The inquest continues.

Coroner says missing woman Sarah McMahon was murder victim
http://www.news.com.au/national/western-australia/coroner-says-missing-woman-sarah-mcmahon-was-murder-victim/news-story/d64ef5cdd62f86daf5f6034797190448             
JANUARY 18, 2013 Angie RaphaelAAP
THE West Australian coroner has found that a 20-year-old woman missing for more than 12 years was a victim of a homicide, but has refused to rule on whether a suspect in the case was involved in the crime.
Sarah Anne McMahon disappeared on November 8, 2000 after telling a colleague she was meeting a friend at 5.30pm and then failing to pick up her sister at 8.30pm that evening.
Donald Victor Morey, 57, has long been considered a suspect in her disappearance and was the last person to speak to Ms McMahon before she disappeared.
After the initial police investigation drew a blank, a further investigation was launched after Morey was convicted of the attempted murder of a Perth prostitute in 2004 and sentenced to 13 years in prison.
He had also been a person of interest in the death of another prostitute the previous year.
However, police were again unable to substantiate enough evidence against Morey, who has consistently denied any involvement in Ms McMahon's disappearance.
A cold case review of both investigations was launched last year and Morey said he was still in contact with Ms McMahon, who he claimed was living in Canada with her two children.
Coroner Alastair Hope said on Thursday that because Ms McMahon had not contacted her loved ones in more than 12 years, he was confident she was dead.
"The circumstances in which Ms McMahon disappeared are sinister and I have confidently been able to exclude the possibility that she died by way of natural causes, accident or suicide,'' he said.
 "In my view, the evidence points overwhelmingly to the proposition that she died by way of unlawful homicide.''
Mr Hope said there was no evidence that Ms McMahon left the country and there were no records held in Medicare, Centrelink, the Australian Taxation Office, the Department of Foreign Affairs and Trade or her bank that would suggest that she was alive in Australia after that time.



A key piece of evidence examined at the inquest was a statement from Natasha Tracy-Ann Kendrick, dated November 11, 2011.
In her statement, Ms Kendrick said she walked into Morey's room and saw a bloodied naked girl on the bed with an "old fashioned rope'' around her neck.
Ms Kendrick claimed that she later saw Morey carrying ``something wrapped in a quilt over his left shoulder'' and said she knew it was McMahon's body.
However, Mr Hope noted that police were unable to find evidence to corroborate her account.
He said there was also evidence capable of supporting a conclusion that Morey lied to police about his movements on November 8, 2000 and falsified documents to support those lies.
"It is always possible that some further evidence may come to light which could result in criminal charges being laid at some later date,'' he said.
"In that context, I do not propose to make any finding in relation to Mr Morey's involvement.''
Originally published as Missing woman 'a murder victim'

"..I did not Abduct Sarah Spiers ..." .... Steven Ross _Retired Taxi Driver

​ A drunk young woman was already in the front seat, which is why I was outside my cab, and after Sarah got in, a man got in beside her.

He didn't know her. He was wearing a white shirt and black trousers. He was good looking and knew how to talk to girls.

I dropped the drunk woman in Dalkeith, where the man wanted to get out after her, but I talked him out of it.

I dropped Sarah and the man in the carpark of the Windsor Hotel in South Perth.

After my initial report in 1996, police took me into custody in August 2004, and again a month later.

They accused me of abducting Sarah and delivering her to another person at the Hotel.

They said they had taxi records that showed I had picker Sarah up on the night she had gone missing and taken her to the Windsor.

Last July, while I was in the hospital, two detectives visited me and wanted to knew about the man who had been in the taxi with Sarah Spiers,

2o years after I had first offered them information.

Fortunately, I have an alibi for the night Sarah disappeared, the night after Sarah got into my cab.

The taxi company and Department of Transport say that only the police can release them to me.

My health is not good and I am writing this letter to put the facts straight in case anyth9ng should happen to me... Steven Ross, Lime Street, East Perth.



There has to be something in this :
https://www.dropbox.com/sh/9ntidqi1g...+Sarah+too.pdf
The Post 25th Oct 2002
I saw Sarah too: witness backs taxi driver
The Post
Bret
Christian
2005.10.02
A Jolimont
man has backed up the story of taxi driver Steven Ross who says he took Sarah Spiers to South Perth on
the morning before she disappeared.
David Boudville (53), of Lansdowne Street, said he had seen Ms Spiers with a man outside a flat in Mill Point Road
early in the morning she disappeared, in January 1996.
Mr Boudville owned an investment unit on the ground floor at 160 Mill Point Road, South Perth.
"I was standing around in the foyer pondering whether it was too early to knock on the door to talk about rent," he said.
"Sarah Spiers and a man came in, pressed the button for the lift and they both went upstairs.
"I'm certain it was her. I'm pretty good with faces because I do a lot of photography.
"As soon as I saw her photo in the paper I contacted t
he police and said that I'd seen her."
Taxi driver Steven Ross said he contacted police eight years ago to say he had dropped Ms Spiers near the Windsor
Hotel in South Perth early on the day before she disappeared.
In late August this year, his home in Embleton, owned by former Claremont mayor Peter Weygers, was raided by
Macro officers (POST August 28).
Mr Weygers' home in Richardson Avenue, Claremont, was raided and searched three weeks later.
Mr Ross said he had contacted police in 1996 because Ms Spiers (18) had got into his taxi outside Club Bay View in
Claremont.
He had thought it was the night she disappeared, but later discovered it was the night before.
But he said he still believed the man who rode in his cab with her might know something
about the crime.
Mr Ross said the man appeared to be hanging around outside Club Bay View waiting for a woman to catch a cab
alone.
When Ms Spiers got into the cab, the man got in beside her. It was clear they did not know each other.
Then a young woman who had been drinking got in the front and asked to go to Dalkeith. The man had originally
said he wanted to go to a nightclub in the city.
Mr Ross said he dropped the woman in Dalkeith then headed for Mounts Bay Road.
Sarah and the man were chatting, and by the time they reached the University of WA the man had decided to go
to South Perth, where Ms Spiers was heading.
When the cab reached the Windsor Hotel, in Mill Point Road, the cab stopped. The man pushed Sarah out of the
cab, paid the fare and got out with her.
Mr Boudville said the flats were 200m to 300m from the Windsor.
"Sarah seemed pretty relaxed," he said.
"She had her hair up and was dressed in a blouse and dress shorts.
"The man was tall, well dressed, skinny with sharp features, black
hair, with small curls at the back.
"I didn't get a good look at his face.
"As soon as I saw her picture it hit me that it was the same girl.
"I reported it straight away to the police, but nothing happened.
"I wondered why I would see her in South
Perth if she disappeared from Claremont. It was not until much later
that I found out she lived in South Perth.
"I didn't think she looked dressed for a nightclub, but she might have got changed and gone to breakfast when I
saw them coming back.
"I let it ride all those years until I read in the POST last week about the taxi driver."

Annalise, Dec 16, 2017

https://www.websleuths.com/forums/threads/australia-claremont-serial-killer-1996-1997-perth-western-australia-19.358426/page-7

http://uploads.tapatalk-cdn.com/20171215/aae84ee10c82f1ca8fd71d2e0b4d2c38.jpg
Then at the end of this article in bold writing it says “a police spokesman said - police do not wish to comment 

I would love to know what the police did about this report from Steven Ross.
The police apparently received a report from David Boudville who claims he saw SS with a tall dark-haired man

at her South Perth apartment block. It has never been mentioned what came of that.

MOOAnnalise, Dec 16, 2017

Claremont trial: Doctor who assessed rape victim recalls violent crime
https://www.9news.com.au/national/claremont-serial-killer-doctor-who-examined-victim-recalls-case/f964f1c8-ad0b-423b-b9e9-31e8c3430e08
By AAP Jan 13, 2020


A doctor who examined a teenage girl after she was raped in a graveyard by the accused Claremont serial killer says the violent case still stands out in her memory after 25 years.
Bradley Robert Edwards, 51, admits sexually assaulting the 17-year-old at Karrakatta Cemetery in 1995 but denies murdering secretary Sarah Spiers, 18, childcare worker Jane Rimmer, 23, and solicitor Ciara Glennon, 27, in 1996 and 1997.

The Western Australia Supreme Court previously heard the ex-Telstra technician abducted the girl as she walked through a dimly-lit park at night, stuffing a sock into her mouth, pulling a cloth bag over her head and tying her up.

The victim testified in a statement that she feared her attacker was going to kill her, after dragging her for several metres and throwing her into bushes.

Amanda Barnard told the court on Monday she had examined thousands of women working as an on-call doctor for the Sexual Assaults Resource Centre, but the case was memorable because it was a violent assault by a stranger, the victim was hooded and restrained, and she had been a virgin.
Dr Barnard said the extent and pain of the teenager's injuries was also notable
The court heard she suffered bruises, abrasions, cuts, swelling and tenderness, including around her wrists and ankles, where red marks from being bound remained visible hours later.

RELATED ARTICLES
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Claremont trial: Graphic video of corpse examination shown in court

It also caused nerve damage, with the victim reporting persistent numbness in her left thumb.
She was left bleeding, dirt-stained and had leaf matter "deeply entangled" in her hair, Dr Barnard testified.
Former detective Teresa Kurtis described the "very slight" girl as being physically shaken and distressed after her ordeal.
Prosecutors say DNA recovered from the teenager matched DNA found on a silk kimono Edwards left behind after attacking a sleeping 18-year-old woman in her Huntingdale home in 1988 - crimes he confessed to in October before the murders trial started.

They also say his DNA was recovered from under Ms Glennon's fingernails.
It is further alleged fibres from Telstra-issued trousers were found on the rape victim, Ms Rimmer and Ms Glennon.

Prosecutors also say fibres from the same make and model as Edwards' work car were found on Ms Rimmer and Ms Glennon.
But his defence team argues exhibits may have been contaminated.

Former forensic officer Barry Mott testified he took photographs of Ms Rimmer where she was found dumped in Wellard bushland in August 1996 and admitted he may have brushed against the body because it was a tight area.

The former sergeant said he also helped remove Ms Rimmer's body, wearing disposable overalls and gloves but nothing over his boots.
Mr Mott said he later delivered a hair sample for testing but did not open the container.
"It wasn't for me to open it. I was a courier for the purpose of the coroner," he said.

Mr Mott also attended Ms Glennon's dumping site in Eglinton in April 1997 where he collected entomology samples.

He wore police-issued blue overalls, gloves and shoe covers.
A crucial piece of evidence collected from the site is a hair sample, titled RH17, but it was not captured on camera.
"I just recall Dr (Karin) Margolius finding it ... we scooped on it quickly so we didn't lose that sample," Mr Mott said.
He is yet to be cross-examined.

The first wife of accused Claremont serial killer Bradley Robert Edwards has testified at his trial, revealing they had an even messier break than first believed. (Supplied)

The knotted cord Bradley Edwards used to tie the rape victim's hands. (Nine / Supplied)

An image tendered as evidence and obtained on Friday, December 6, 2019, of a silk kimono Claremont serial killings accused Bradley Robert Edwards left behind at a Huntingdale house in 1988 after attacking an 18-year-old woman as she slept. Prosecutors say his DNA was on the kimono, a 17-year-old girl he admits abducting and twice raping in a cemetery, and under murder victim Ciara Glennon's fingernails. (AAP Image/Supplied by the Western Australian Supreme Court) (AAP)

Accused Claremont Killer Bradley Robert Edwards (Supplied)


A supplied image obtained on Wednesday, November 27, 2019, shows evidence put before the first wife of accused Claremont serial killer Bradley Robert Edwards at his trial in the Western Australian Supreme Court. The woman, whose identity is suppressed, was asked about the types of Telstra van he drove. (PR IMAGE)

Claremont killer trial LIVE: Homicide detective reveals 'pure act of compassion' carried out during Jane's post-mortem
https://www.watoday.com.au/national/western-australia/claremont-killer-trial-live-forensic-officer-to-be-cross-examined-by-defence-20200114-p53rbs.html
By Heather McNeill
January 14, 2020

6.06pm on Jan 14, 2020
Judge releases map of areas scoured by TRG in the weeks after bodies were discovered
Former Macro taskforce detective Robert Kays was responsible for the search operations for the surrounding areas where Jane’s body was found. This photo indicates where searches were carried out.CREDIT:
Former Macro taskforce detective Robert Kays was responsible for the search operations for the surroundi

4.10pm on Jan 14, 2020
Court has wrapped up for the day
Justice Stephen Hall has agreed to release the maps drawn on by Mr Kays that indicate the areas his TRG team searched in the days and weeks after the discoveries of Jane and Ciara's bodies. 
The images will be posted to this blog when they are made available.
Court will resume at 10am tomorrow with a new witness, then-Senior Constable Hyde, a member of the forensic team who examined Ciara's body in situ.  

4.06pm on Jan 14, 2020
'The homicide squad drove sedans': Homicide detective
Ms Barbagallo, during her reexamination of Ms Young has asked what car she drove at the time of the murders. 
She has replied the homicide squad drove either Ford or Holden sedans. 
The state alleges fibres found on Jane and Ciara's body were from a Holden Commodore station wagon. 
Ms Young has completed giving her evidence. 

4.02pm on Jan 14, 2020
Homicide detective wore navy suit to Jane's crime scene
Ms Cleary is now showing Ms Young a photo of her taken on the day Jane's body was found where she is pointing into the bushland. 
It shows her wearing a navy suit and black high heels with her hair tied back into a ponytail.
The state alleges a single blue polyester fibre found in Jane's hair is from the custom-made Telstra-issued navy trousers Mr Edwards wore for work at the time. 

A photograph of Woolcoot Road, Wellard where Jane's body was found in bushland just off the road.


3.56pm on Jan 14, 2020
Homicide detective pushes back after defence suggests she entered Jane's crime scene
Ms Cleary is now cross-examining Ms Young and asking her whether she entered the bushland alcove where Jane's body was found. 
Ms Cleary: It wasn't possible to see the body from the road was it?
Ms Young: Yes. 
Ms Cleary: Can I suggest you had to take at least one step, maybe two into the bush to see the body?
Ms Young: I can categorically tell you as a member of the homicide squad, I not only knew better but I would never enter a crime scene, ever.
Sensitive footage of Jane's crime scene is now being shown where the body cannot be seen from the road, or a couple of steps into the bush. 
"The footage appears very dark in there. My recollection is being able to crouch down and peer through those bushes and seeing what was a human form," Ms Young said. 

The bushland where Jane Rimmer’s body was found, as seen from the road.

3.47pm on Jan 14, 2020

'I attended each post-mortem for continuity': Homicide detective
Mr Young attended the mortuary again later that day for a further examination of Jane's body. She also attended another examination two days later on August 6. 
She said she attended the examinations for continuity purposes. 
The examinations were not filmed, and Ms Young cannot recall what she was wearing during them, but said she would have likely been wearing scrubs or a white surgical coat over her business attire. 
She said she wouldn't have been wearing a hair net or gloves. 

3.43pm on Jan 14, 2020
Homicide detective reveals 'pure act of compassion' carried out during Jane's post-mortem
Ms Young is now recalling a piece of Jane's hair given to her by Dr Margolius. 
"In the theatre there was a stage where Dr Margolius took a clump of Jane's hair, she washed it in the trough and then that was given to me at the end of the post-mortem," she said. 
"That piece of hair was provided to me. I took that piece of hair home and I shampooed it and washed it, I then brushed it, put a lacky band around it and placed it in a gift box to give to the family so they had a memory of Jane.
"It was purely provided to me out of an act of kindness and compassion to the family."
Fibres found in Jane's hair make up the only forensic evidence ithe state alleges links Mr Edwards to the crime. 

Jane Rimmer's funeral
Jane Rimmer’s parents and sister at her funeral in 1996.

3.34pm on Jan 14, 2020
'There was a significant neck injury discovered during Jane's post-mortem': Homicide detective
Ms Young is now recalling the post-mortem conducted on Jane's body the following morning. 
"My role was to be present throughout the post-mortem to record information provided to us so it could be relayed to the inquiry team and continue with the continuity of being present with Jane," she said. 
"On that day within the actual mortuary theatre I was wearing a brand new set of hospital scrubs and wellington boots provided by Dr Margolius.
"There was no need for me to wear gloves because I had no contact with the body."

3.10pm on Jan 14, 2020
Mr Edwards taking glasses off when graphic images shown

A courtroom sketch of Bradley Edwards, drawn on the first day of his murder trial.


During the past two days of the trial, accused man Mr Edwards has at times taken his glasses off while sensitive images and footage are being shown. 
He has taken his glasses off as the photos of Jane's body in the mortuary are being shown for the first time. 
He is resting his cheek on his hand and writing notes. 

3.07pm on Jan 14, 2020
'We had two families on hold waiting to know whether it was their daughter who had been found'
After Jane's body was removed from the Wellard scene, it was taken to the state mortuary, where Ms Young also attended that night. 
"We had two families on hold that night waiting to know whether it was their daughter we'd found so the primary duty that night was to try and do identification," she said. 
"Dr Stephen Knott was present at the mortuary that evening ... and he made attempts to contact Jane's dentist and they were unsuccessful. 
"Arrangements had been made for Sarah's dental records which I believe were held by the inquiry team to be delivered to the mortuary that evening.
"Dr Knott was able to examine with the records that were Sarah's and was able to tell us that evening that it was definitely not Sarah."

Sarah's body has never been found. 
Ms Young is now recalling Jane's body was x-rayed for Dr Knott to review the dental structure. 
She said he also partially unzipped the body bag and examined Jane's facial area for a short time. 
She is now being shown photos she took of the body being examined. 

Forensic officers 'didn't know they could contaminate a crime scene at the time of the Claremont killings as DNA technology was so new'
Bradley Edwards is accused of killing Ciara Glennon, Sarah Spiers, Jane Rimmer
Forensics officer told court cops didn't know they could contaminate scene

Edwards' defence claims that key DNA evidence was contaminated  
By AUSTRALIAN ASSOCIATED PRESS

PUBLISHED: 05:52, 14 January 2020
https://www.dailymail.co.uk/news/article-7884683/Cops-didnt-know-contaminate-crime-scene-time-Claremont-killings.html

A former forensic officer has told the Claremont serial killings trial DNA technology was 'very much in its infancy' in the 1990s and forensic officers did not consider they could potentially contaminate a crime scene.
Ex-Telstra technician Bradley Robert Edwards, 51, is on trial in the Western Australia Supreme Court accused of murdering secretary Sarah Spiers, 18, childcare worker Jane Rimmer, 23, and solicitor Ciara Glennon, 27, in 1996 and 1997.
Former sergeant Barry Mott testified on Tuesday, saying there was no written protocol at the time to ensure forensic officers wore personal protection equipment at crime scenes.
He agreed officers often wore gloves to protect themselves and prevent leaving behind fingerprints.

Defence counsel Paul Yovich asked: 'You certainly weren't thinking you could contaminate something without even touching it?'

Mr Mott replied: 'Definitely not.'
He said he arrived at Ms Rimmer's Wellard crime scene in August 1996 in a white station wagon, and wore disposable forensic overalls and gloves.
Prosecutors allege fibres found on Ms Rimmer match a station wagon that Edwards had access to via Telstra.

Mr Mott also said Ms Rimmer's body was not visible from the roadway, which contradicted the evidence of some other officers who said they did not need to enter the bushes to see part of her body.

He earlier admitted he may have inadvertently brushed against Ms Rimmer's body while photographing the site.
In April 1997, Mr Mott attended Ms Glennon's dumping site in Eglinton bushland where he collected evidence and helped move the body.
Asked whether he may have stepped on Ms Glennon's hair or body, Mr Mott replied: 'I honestly can't recall ... trying to move a deceased body is quite difficult, especially one in that condition. You're trying to protect the body as much as you can and trying to be respectful.'

Sergeant Mark Harbridge, who was a senior constable in 1996, said he wore gloves, a mask and overalls during Ms Rimmer's two post mortem examinations, but did not get closer than 40cm from the body to photograph her.
He had also attended the dumping site, saying his job was mostly to hold up a light, and he did not wear gloves or touch Ms Rimmer.

The defence argues contamination may be an issue in the case, which relies heavily on DNA and fibre evidence.

Former Telstra technician and confessed rapist Bradley Robert Edwards, 51, is fighting allegations he killed three women

Edawrds is accused of murdering secretary Sarah Spiers (left), 18, childcare worker Jane Rimmer (centre), 23, and solicitor Ciara Glennon (right), 27, in 1996 and 1997.

Claremont serial killings trial podcast: ‘The Lock of Hair’
Kate RyanThe West Australian
Tuesday, 14 January 2020


https://thewest.com.au/news/claremont-serial-killings/claremont-serial-killings-trial-podcast-the-lock-of-hair-ng-b881433636z

Following Jane Rimmer’s post-mortem, the pathologist who carried it out gave one of the detectives a lock of Jane’s hair.
The detective, Vicky Young then washed, brushed and placed an elastic around it and gave it to the Rimmer family.
During her evidence today, she said it was an ‘act of compassion’. But she also said the hair was covered in fluids and matter when it was given to her.

On the podcast for day 24 of the Claremont Serial Killings trial, Alison Fan, Tim Clarke and Natalie Bonjolo discuss this act of kindness, and whether this could have an impact in the case against Bradley Edwards.
In a massive day of WA’s trial of the century, several police officers were questioned, including the first Macro Taskforce detective, who organised a massive search - which included TRG officers - of the Wellard area following the discovery of Jane Rimmer’s body, for Sarah Spiers.
But they didn’t find anything. Sarah still has never been found.
Also today, for Sergeant Barry Mott revealed he drove to Jane Rimmer’s crime scene in a station wagon, the type of car the prosecution says Bradley Edwards used when the murders happened, and fibres from it which were found in both Jane Rimmer and Ciara Glennon’s bodies.
Join the Claremont in Conversation podcast team as they discuss why this new information may be an obstacle for the prosecution.

Don’t forget to send your questions to claremontpodcast@wanews.com.au

Simon Rochford's missing murder weapon discovery has 'stench of cover-up': WA Opposition
By David Weber
Updated 12 Sep 2015

http://www.abc.net.au/news/2015-09-12/murder-weapon-discovery-a-cover-up-says-wa-shadow-ag/6770470?pfmredir=sm

WA Labor MP John Quigley
Posted 11 Sep 2015, 3:49pm
John Quigley has also accused the Police Minister of keeping secret the discovery of the weapon.Jonathan Beal: ABC


It was claimed by the Western Australian Prison Department, the Western Australian Police and the Western Australian media
that Simon Rochford alledgedy committed suicide in Albany Jail while serving a l5-year sentence for killing his girlfriend in 1994. ABC
The real question is...
"... Did Simon Rochford actually committ suicide in a Western Australian Jail or was Simon Rochford murdered in a

Western Australian Jail and it made to look like a suicide by Western Australian Prison Officers????..."

There needs to be an independent coroners inquiry into the cause of the death of Simon Rochford .....

Western Australia's shadow attorney-general has accused police of a cover-up, after it was revealed a

weapon used in two notorious murders has been found despite being thought lost for many years.
Part of the weapon used by Simon Rochford in the killing of his girlfriend Brigitta Dickens and suspected murder

of Pamela Lawrence in 1994, was found during an audit of exhibits two years ago.
The weapon was never found in the investigation into the death of Ms Lawrence in Mosman Park, a murder that led

to the wrongful conviction of Andrew Mallard.
After the High Court overturned Mr Mallard's conviction in 2006, a cold case review identified Rochford as the

likely suspect in Ms Lawrence's murder.
Rochford, who was serving a prison sentence for the murder of Ms Dickens, died by suicide in 2006.

Police determined that he had used a wooden stick with a blue weight attached to it in the murders of Ms Dickens and Ms Lawrence.

But the Corruption and Crime Commission (CCC) was told in 2007 that despite an extensive search of evidence

and exhibits, Rochford's weapon could not be found.
Shadow attorney-general John Quigley said the Police Minister now had "some very serious questions to answer".

If the police are saying there was an order for the destruction of this exhibit, produce the order.
Shadow Attorney-General John Quigley
"What's happened and what is happening now has the stench of a cover-up," he said.

"It is very serious and now the Government should come out and say how long they have known about this, the police should

come out now and produce the court order that they claim ordered the destruction of this vital piece of evidence.
"That's what my concern is, we're not being told the truth back then, we haven't been told the truth in the interim and now

Police Minister [Liza] Harvey has some very serious questions to answer, as does the Commissioner of Police."

It was fragments of Prussian blue paint found in Ms Lawrence's wounds, matching similar fragments in Rochford's backpack,

which eventually helped convince police he was the killer.
Officers had zeroed in on Rochford after identifying a palm print found at the scene of Ms Lawrence's murder during a cold case review.

A police spokesman said testing carried out on the weight collar since 2013 had confirmed "what had already been established- that the paint on the collar matched fragments found in Ms Lawrence's wounds and in Rochford's backpack."

Questions over search for weapon
Mr Quigley, a former police union lawyer who later campaigned for Mr Mallard's release, questioned whether the search for the missing weapon was a serious one.
"The search was incompetently conducted, and we can go back through a number of very serious cases where their searches for critical evidence has been incompetent.
"In the Mallard case, they couldn't find the palm print that proved that Rochford was the murderer and not Mallard.
rned that this is a further case of police incompetence, and more concerningly, a cover-up."
Mr Quigley also suggested the State Government must
A police spokesman told the ABC "under established evidence protocols of the time there would have been an order for destruction of exhibits at the conclusion of the appeal period."
"For reasons unknown this didn't occur with the collar," the spokesman said.
Mr Quigley said in his experience, he was aware of orders being sought for destruction of evidence relating to other cases.
"If the police are saying there was an order for the destruction of this exhibit, produce the order," he said.
The weapon used to kill the two woman was previously described as a wooden stick, such as a broomstick, with a dumbbell weight attached.
A weight collar is used in bodybuilding to hold removable plates onto the bar.
In 2007, counsel assisting the CCC Jeremy Gormly told the commission that Rochford retained the weapon after the murder of Ms Dickens but appeared to have
"dismantled the weapon into its two parts and stored them in different parts of his baggage, possibly in two different backpacks."
While police confirmed the weight collar was found in 2013, they have made no mention of the stick.
Topics: police, law-crime-and-justice, judges-and-legal-profession, perth-6000, wa

Pamela Lawrence's New Murder suspect Simon Rochford  dies in Albany Regional Prison 

http://www.abc.net.au/pm/content/2006/s1643201.ht

Murder suspect dies in custody

PM - Friday, 19 May , 2006  18:32:00
Reporter: David Weber

MARK COLVIN: The man who West Australian police were investigating for the 1994 murder of Pamela Lawrence has died in custody.
It's the latest, almost unbelievable, twist in the case of Andrew Mallard.
Mr Mallard served 11 years in prison for the Lawrence murder before the High Court quashed his conviction as a miscarriage of justice.
Last Friday we told you how WA Police had started a new investigation, and matched a palm print found at

the Lawrence murder scene to a man serving time for violent crime.
Now that man is dead.
David Weber reports.

DAVID WEBER: Police say the original palm print evidence was taken on May the 24th, 1994 - the day after Pamela Lawrence was killed.
The new investigation led to the palm print being matched with Simon Rochford.
Simon Rochford killed his girlfriend in 1994. She died after being hit on the head with a heavy object.
Now, Rochford is dead too.
Commissioner Ian Johnson of the Department of Corrective Services.

IAN JOHNSON: You'd be pretty much aware that we've had a death in custody down at the Albany Regional Prison

and that the person who died is Simon Rochford.

Obviously he's been recently subject to a fair bit of media attention in terms of the, what I supposed is called the Mallard case. 
He was found this morning, approximately 7:44 by a couple of prison officers in his cell, quite obviously deceased at that time.

They've raised the alarm. A nurse has been in attendance, just about immediately. 

DAVID WEBER: Commissioner Johnson says the cell is being treated as a crime scene and the death will undergo a police investigation.
He says he can't disclose the cause of death. Commissioner Johnson says Rochford was considered "at risk" after

he was interviewed by police on Thursday of last week.

IAN JOHNSON: At that time the prison superintendent and the other authorities down there made a proactive decision

to actually place him at risk on the at risk management system and they did that because they wanted to make sure that

he was dealing with the situation. Obviously it's a fairly intense situation he was being subjected to, so they placed him on the system. 

He was placed in an observation cell for three days, and certainly monitored very closely, right through till Monday. On Monday,

as a result of various assessments made by psychs and the like, he was then placed back in his own cell. 

DAVID WEBER: Police have been in the process of trying to track Simon Rochford's movements in 1994. 
Until today, the investigation was going the way of any cold case review. The possible death of a new suspect probably hadn't been considered. 

Deputy Commissioner Chris Dawson was told about the death just before holding a scheduled press conference.

CHRIS DAWSON: I'm expecting that there will be at least a number of more weeks before the team that we have tasked with reviewing

the matters not only receive forensic reports but complete quite a raft of different investigations that are flowing from this.

DAVID WEBER: Meanwhile, the Police Union has spoken on behalf of the five officers stood down last week.
The Police Commissioner stood down five senior officers who were involved in the original investigation into the murder of Pamela Lawrence.

Two of them are assistant commissioners.
The Police Union's Mike Dean says it could be years before the officers have their day in court.

Mike Dean believes all of them are innocent of any wrongdoing.
MIKE DEAN: I believe that when these officers are allowed to debate these issues publicly that many people will be surprised and embarrassed.

They're used to the publicity, the criticism, but they're also used to having their day in court and they need that.

MARK COLVIN: President of the Police Union in Western Australia, Mike Dean with David Weber.

Claremont serial killings trial podcast: ‘The Guess Watch’
The West Australian
Wednesday, 11 December 2019 2:26PM

 
https://thewest.com.au/news/claremont-serial-killings/claremont-serial-killings-trial-podcast-the-guess-watch-ng-b881409088z
 
Jane Rimmer disappeared in the early hours of June 9, 1996 from Claremont. her body was found 55 days later on August 3 in bushland in Wellard.
On June 9, 1996, a man was riding a horse in Wellard, when his horse spooked. He fell off and found a guess watch.
That watch turned out to be Jane Rimmer's.
Day 13 of the Claremont Serial Killings trial heard the man didn't report the watch to police until after Jane's Body was found. It turns out he fell just two metres from where her body was dumped.
Before she disappeared, friends of Jane Rimmer relived the decision the 23-year-old made to stay out alone while her friends caught a taxi home the night she disappeared.
One friend, Lynda Donovan remembered a conversation she had with an emotional Jane the night she disappeared - a typical conversation many friends have had after a few drinks, only now it's a heartbreaking reminder of her friend, and her feelings about herself that night.
The court was shown more CCTV of the night Jane Rimmer was last seen alive, also, for the first time, vision of Ciara Glennon in Claremont was shown.
But probably the most important part of this vision was what wasn't able to be seen - Bradley Edwards.
The man the prosecution says killed Jane Rimmer and Ciara Glennon was nowhere to be seen.
Police said out of all of the vision they've managed to obtain from the nights the two women disappeared, there's no evidence of the man the prosecution say killed the two women in any of the vision.

Criminal defence lawyer Tom Percy QC joins Natalie Bonjolo and Tim Clarke to discuss why the day's proceedings go little way to proving Bradley Edwards is the Claremont Serial Killer.

​​Girl seen getting into unmarked Ute Type Vehicle the early morning Ciara Glennon went missing
Claremont burger boys saw victim hitchhike

Girl seen getting into unmarked Ute Type Vehicle
Ian Stanford, 54, saw a woman getting into a white vehicle ute type vehicle with a canopy, reasonable condition ... no writing on the side of it.
By Angie Raphael - DECEMBER 17 2019
https://www.bluemountainsgazette.com.au/story/6546673/claremont-burger-boys-saw-victim-hitchhike/?cs=9397

Ian Stanford, 54, was a passenger in a car driven by Lisa Mighall when he saw a woman getting into a white vehicle, which he said may have been a ute with a canopy.
"It looked to be in reasonable condition ... no writing on the side of it," he said.
"As we went past the back of the car, the tail gate was up and there was a person holding it up ... I couldn't understand why there was a girl or a lady ... and she was in the process of getting in the back.
"I remember saying to Lisa, 'after what's gone on in this area, I can't understand why someone would do that'."
Mr Stanford said he never saw the woman's face but she was wearing a white top and black skirt.

Jane Rimmer’s body discovery upsets witness
Angie Raphael and Rebecca- Claremont serial killings trial
Angie Raphael and Rebecca Le May
AAP
December 13, 2019

https://www.perthnow.com.au/news/claremont-serial-killings/claremont-body-discovery-upsets-witness-ng-b881410962z


A witness in the Claremont serial killings trial has fought back tears while recollecting the discovery of Jane Rimmer’s body almost two months after she was murdered.
The 23-year-old was last seen alive outside Claremont’s Continental Hotel in the early hours of June 9, 1996 and screams were later heard in the semi-rural Perth suburb of Wellard.
Ex-Telstra technician and confessed rapist Bradley Robert Edwards, 51, denies murdering the childcare worker, 18-year-old secretary Sarah Spiers earlier that year and solicitor Ciara Glennon, 27, in 1997.

Tracey Bell told his Western Australia Supreme Court trial she was horseriding with Steven Daventhoren on August 3, 1996 when they came across a woman standing on a dirt road who called out to them while they were still some distance away.
“It sounded like she was saying ’don’t come down here’,” Ms Bell said on Friday.
“I heard her say she’d found a body.
“She said she went into the bushes to pick some arum lilies and she saw a foot.”
Mr Daventhoren walked a short distance off the road into dense vegetation, while Ms Bell remained behind holding her dog.
He said he took about two or three steps into the bushes and saw “exposed parts of a human body”.
“The body was naked,” he said in a statement.
“I didn’t touch anything or look any further, and went back out on the road.”
The woman stayed at the spot while her husband went to alert police because she “didn’t want to leave her alone“, Ms Bell said, her voice breaking.
“I said I’d stay there as well.”
Mr Daventhoren also found a wooden-handled pocket knife “in good condition” on the same road earlier during their ride.

Ms Bell agreed they spotted an “item“, which she thought was a “strange thing to find”.
“I remember it was something of significance.”
The court previously heard the knife was Telstra-issued.
The trial also heard from Neil Fearis, who was a senior partner at the law firm Ms Glennon worked for.
On the night she was taken, he drove her and other junior colleagues to the Continental Hotel because he lived nearby but didn’t stay long because he was not “in the mood to party on” after St Patrick’s Day drinks.

He said she was in a festive mood, having completed her first week back at work after one year of travelling overseas.
“They were boisterous but not inebriated,” he said.
The last time he saw Ms Glennon was when they entered the bar just before closing time on March 14, 1997.

University friend James Connor estimated Ms Glennon was at the venue for only 10 to 15 minutes, and picked up a cardigan or jacket she threw near a table, which landed on the floor.
“I wrapped the arms around my waist,” he said.

The defence argues fibres found on Ms Glennon’s body could have come from a source other than Edwards.
Dr Connor said a tired-looking Ms Glennon retrieved the garment close to midnight and he never saw her again.
“She probably had a few drinks, but she was walking and talking fine.”
Karen Mabbott said she saw a young woman matching Ms Glennon’s description walking on a footpath towards Mosman Park about 12.15am.
“She didn’t look like she was in a hurry, or that she was scared of anything ... just trying to get home,” Ms Mabbott said.
She also saw a six-foot tall man with dark hair and olive skin standing nearby behind a light-coloured vehicle.
“I thought at first maybe he was a taxi driver and the young woman had been dropped off.”

This is a quote from Bond University's Dr Wayne Petherick from the ABC's Courage of our Convictions (2000) , directly regarding the Claremont Serial Killer, based off crime scene information. Quoted verbatim.
It would then be assumed that the offender has average to above-average intelligence, they are socially competent, they prefer skilled work, they're sexually competent, they have higher birth order, their father's work is stable though they had some inconsistent childhood discipline, they have a controlled mood during the crime, they may use alcohol or drugs with the crime, they usually operate according to some precipitating situational stress, so that could be a fight with a partner, loss of a job, loss of some money gambling, they generally live with a partner, they have a mobility, generally speaking a car that's kept in good condition, and they will follow the crime in the news and the media.

Peter Kurten, Dec 15, 2017

The knotted cord Bradley Edwards used to tie the rape victim's hands. (Nine / Supplied)
An image tendered as evidence and obtained on Friday, December 6, 2019, of a silk kimono Claremont serial killings accused Bradley Robert Edwards left behind at a Huntingdale house in 1988 after attacking an 18-year-old woman as she slept. Prosecutors say his DNA was on the kimono, a 17-year-old girl he admits abducting and twice raping in a cemetery, and under murder victim Ciara Glennon's fingernails. (AAP Image/Supplied by the Western Australian Supreme Court) (AAP)

Claremont serial killings: WA Police quiz new people, request DNA samples
JOHN FLINT, PerthNow - December 27, 2014


http://www.perthnow.com.au/news/western-australia/claremont-serial-killings-wa-police-quiz-new-people-request-dna-samples/story-fnhocxo3-1227168035093
COLD case detectives investigating the Claremont serial killings are reaching out to new people, asking them to fill out a questionnaire and provide DNA.
Pensioner Noel Geoffrey Coward was interviewed on December 18 at Curtin House by two detectives from the Special Crime Squad.
But Mr Coward is not a person of interest in the case. For many years he has been urging police to look closely at a former taxi driver he brought to their attention after the abduction and murder of Ciara Glennon in 1997.
Mr Coward is unsure why detectives wanted him to fill out the questionnaire or why they wanted his DNA.
He said one of the detectives explained it was part of “a process of elimination” and they were making the same approach to many more people whose names were on file.
He said the special crime squad had gone to some effort to locate him and arrange the interview.
WA Police would not comment on Mr Coward’s account of the interview.
Detective-Inspector Casey Prins of the special crime squad provided a brief statement to The Sunday Times. He said: “Claremont (Macro) is an ongoing investigation, hence inquiries will continue to be made.
“WA Police remain committed to resolving these and other significant offences.”
The statement is identical to one issued by Insp Prins in 2012 when the media reported on another man who was interviewed.
Mr Coward said he told the two detectives he wouldn’t fill out the questionnaire or let them have his DNA.
“Primarily (that was) because I don’t trust them,” he said. “And because they had not, in my opinion, investigated the original evidence I supplied.
“(The detective) said he could not show me (the questionnaire) unless I complied and filled it out.”
Mr Coward said the detectives then tried to convince him that the former taxi driver was “not their man” and that he had been last interviewed by police in 2011. Mr Coward is known to The Sunday Times because he brought his suspicions about the taxi driver to the newspaper in 2001.
At the time, the Macro task force, set up to investigate the killings, was focused on an introverted public servant who lived with his parents in Cottesloe.
The then prime suspect was the target of around-the-clock surveillance.
WA Police were criticised in intervening years for being too narrowly focused at the time.
Mr Coward believes police failed in the early years to properly investigate the former taxi driver, who he claims was in Claremont at the precise time Ciara Glennon went missing, and was driving his taxi on the nights the other murder victims, Sarah Spiers and Jane Rimmer, vanished from the entertainment precinct.
Mr Coward said there was other evidence he passed to the police that should have raised a flag about the man.

From article : WA Police quiz new people, request DNA samples
JOHN FLINT, PerthNow

December 28, 2014 

"Pensioner Noel Geoffrey Coward was interviewed on December 18 at Curtin House by two detectives from the Special Crime Squad.
But Mr Coward is not a person of interest in the case. For many years he has been urging police to look closely at a former taxi driver he brought to their attention after the abduction and murder of Ciara Glennon in 1997.
Mr Coward is unsure why detectives wanted him to fill out the questionnaire or why they wanted his DNA.
He said one of the detectives explained it was part of “a process of elimination” and they were making the same approach to many more people whose names were on file.
He said the special crime squad had gone to some effort to locate him and arrange the interview.

WA Police would not comment on Mr Coward’s account of the interview.
The statement is identical to one issued by Insp Prins in 2012 when the media reported on another man who was interviewed.
Mr Coward said he told the two detectives he wouldn't fill out the questionnaire or let them have his DNA.
"Primarily (that was) because I don't trust them," he said. "And because they had not, in my opinion, investigated the original evidence I supplied."
"(The detective) said he could not show me (the questionnaire) unless I complied and filled it out."

Mr Coward said the detectives then tried to convince him that the former taxi driver was "not their man" and that he had been last interviewed by police in 2011.

Mr Coward is known to*The Sunday Times*because he brought his suspicions about the taxi driver to the newspaper in 2001.
Mr Coward believes police failed in the early years to properly investigate the former taxi driver, who he claims was in Claremont at the precise time Ciara Glennon went missing, and was driving his taxi on the nights the other murder victims, Sarah Spiers and Jane Rimmer, vanished from the entertainment precinct.
Mr Coward said there was other evidence he passed to the police that should have raised a flag about the man.
In 2001, police claimed the taxi driver's explanation for his movements on the night of Ciara Glennon's disappearance checked out.

Then-police commissioner Barry Matthews got involved after a university professor and a former senator, both friends of Mr Coward, sought a meeting with Mr Matthews, suggesting Mr Coward's information was not being treated seriously enough. '

Mr Matthews told the pair that the taxi driver had been interviewed twice and his taxi logs had been checked."

https://www.perthnow.com.au/news/wa...a-samples-ng-bc48350f2d83ae30f2f574c948331e82

Claremont serial killings trial podcast: ‘The Contamination Case’
Kate RyanPerthNow
January 10, 2020 


https://www.perthnow.com.au/news/claremont-serial-killings/claremont-serial-killings-trial-podcast-the-contamination-case-ng-b881430525z

‘The Contamination Case’-Claremont serial killings trial podcast


When police arrived at the scenes where Jane Rimmer and Ciara Glennon’s bodies had been dumped, they didn’t have to wear gloves to prevent cross contamination.
On day 22 of the Claremont Serial Killings trial, former forensic police officer Robert Hemelaar took the stand for a third day where it was revealed there wasn’t a big focus on preserving a crime scene in the mid 1990s.
He said there was no protocol for wearing gloves and covers for their boots, only that gloves should be worn while handling ‘deceased matter’ for their own safety.
During his cross examination by defence lawyer Paul Yovich, Mr Hemelaar admitted he had handled some evidence - a tree branch - with his bare hands.
The West Australian: Claremont serial killings trial full coverage
The court had been told tree branches had been pulled off nearby trees and placed over both Jane Rimmer and Ciara Glennon’s bodies to partially conceal them.
He also said a key piece of evidence, a hair sample from Ciara Glennon which the prosecution says contained fibres matching unique Telstra shorts, the kind issued to Bradley Edwards while he was working at Telstra, had not been videoed while being collected from Ciara’s body.
It was revealed that the sample had also not had tamper-proof tape stuck on the container until years after it was collected.
Cross-contamination is the main case the defence has said will provide reasonable doubt about whether Bradley Edwards is the Claremont Serial Killer.
Join Natalie Bonjolo, Tim Clarke and Alison Fan as they take you through Day 22’s evidence, and answer some of your questions.

Claremont serial killings trial podcast: ‘Your Questions Answered’
Kate RyanPerthNow
December 21, 2019 5:17AM

https://www.perthnow.com.au/news/claremont-serial-killings/claremont-serial-killings-trial-podcast-your-questions-answered-ng-b881417750z
 
 ‘Your Questions Answered’-Claremont serial killings trial podcast
The West Australian: Claremont serial killings trial full coverage
https://thewest.com.au/news/claremont-serial-killings

CLAREMONT KILLINGS TRIALOfficer sent Ciara’s Glennon’s hair to FBI experts
How Ciara Glennon’s hair travelled from Perth to America and then Canberra to be examined by some of the world’s leading forensic scientists was detailed yesterday by a forensic officer.
https://thewest.com.au/news/claremont-serial-killings/claremont-serial-killings-trial-officer-sent-ciaras-glennons-hair-to-fbi-experts-ng-b881433737z

Tim ClarkeLegal Affairs Edito
Tech glitch delays start, hair sample crucial
Day 25 got off to a difficult start with technical difficulties delaying proceedings before Ciara Glennon’s hair sample become the centre of forensic testimony. RECAP THE DAY’S PROCEEDINGS.
Emily Moulton

https://thewest.com.au/news/claremont-serial-killings/claremont-serial-killings-trial-live-blog-of-bradley-robert-edwards-trial-day-25-ng-b881433710z

CLAREMONT TRIAL: DAY 24Rimmer family given lock of hair in ‘act of compassion’
https://thewest.com.au/news/claremont-serial-killings/claremont-serial-killings-trial-live-blog-of-bradley-robert-edwards-trial-day-25-ng-b881433710z
A gift box containing a lock of Jane Rimmer’s hair — taken from her body then washed, shampooed and brushed by a police officer — was presented to her family after her post-mortem.
Tim Clarke


DAY 24 Claremont trial podcast: ‘The Lock of Hair’
CLAREMONT TRIAL‘Two families wanted to know if it was their daughter’

If Bradley Edwards is convicted, will he be asked where Sarah Spiers is? Why wasn’t Lance Williams eliminated as a suspect earlier? Will Bradley Edwards be cross-examined?
In this bonus episode, criminal defence lawyer Damien Cripps and The West Australian legal affairs editor Tim Clarke answer some of the burning questions you’ve had from WA’s trial of the century.
We’ve received hundreds of questions from listeners all over the world and hope to answer as many as we can.
From true crime fans, to those who remember growing up in Perth at the peak of the crimes, this trial has captivated so many.

Keep the questions coming in at claremontpodcast@wanews.com.au
Stay tuned to Claremont The Trial podcast over the Christmas break for more bonus episodes.

Title: We Saw Jane Rimmer Hitchhiking - Student
Author:Andrew Clennell
Date: 19 June 1996

Publisher: Community Times, News Chronical, Nedlands Edition.
Title: We Saw Jane Rimmer Hitching - Uni Student says
Author: Andrew Clennell Date: 19th June, 1996
Publisher: Community Times, News Chronical, Nedlands Edition
University student Emma Clayton and her friends almost picked up a blonde girl she is sure was Jane Rimmer early on the Sunday Morning Jane Rimmer disapeared.
Miss Clayton (21 years old uni student) said she saw the girl staggering along Stirling Highway, thumb out, hitching a lift at 12.30 am. Emma Clayton told police about the incident and her description of the cloths Jane was wearing matched that of a police description which had not been released to the media. Ms Clayton said she and her friends had been in Stirling Highway after leaving a 21st birthday party at Claremont Yacht Club. "Down near Lock Street we saw a girl Hitchhiking," she said. The Girl had her thumb out and we just slowed down and thought maybe we should pick her up but didn't." The conversation between the two couples in the car had been that she was a silly girl for trying to hitch in the area and they discussed whether they should pick the girl up. The decided at the last minute to move on. "we said of all places for a girl to be hitchhiking alone, this was probably the worst," Miss Clayton said. She said initially, after she had heard of Jane Rimmer's disappearance, she felt guilty that that hadn't picked her up. "If we had picked her up things would have been a lot different, " Miss Clayton said. When she and her friends saw the girl there were no other cars on the Stirling Highway ...

Claremont serial killings trial podcast: ‘Ciara’s Last Night’
Kate RyanPerthNow
December 16, 2019 1:18PM


https://www.perthnow.com.au/news/claremont-serial-killings/claremont-serial-killings-trial-podcast-ciaras-last-night-ng-b881413200z

March 14, 1997 was the last time Ciara Glennon was seen alive.
She’s been at a work function, by all accounts she didn’t want to go out that night, because she had her sister's hen's night the next night. But she was convinced to go out to Claremont.
She’d only been back in Perth for two weeks, after travelling for six months.
In this podcast, Tim Clarke and Damien Cripps ask whether she had known about the other missing girls as well as the rest of Perth, simply because she wasn’t in the country when Sarah Spiers and Jane Rimmer went missing.
In May 1997, WA Police released a re-enactment of Ciara’s final hours in a desperate attempt to jog someone’s memory of the night of March 14, and the early hours of March 15 1997.

11 people did see Ciara that night.
On day 16 of the Claremont Serial Killings trial, they gave evidence of seeing a woman matching Ciara’s description walking alone on Stirling Highway. Some witnesses say they saw her talking to a man in a white car, even starting to get in.
In a tragic premonition, a worker at a Thai restaurant over the road from where she was last seen even made a passing comment that “she might be the next girl to go.”
Ciara’s body was found 19 days later near a scrub track in Eglington, 40 km north of Perth.
Join Natalie Bonjolo, Tim Clarke and criminal defence lawyer Damien Cripps as they dissect day 16 and answer listener questions.

Send in your own questions to:  claremontpodcast@wanews.com.au

​​"If you told the authorities the information in my statement I have just given you as to who was involved in the Claremont Serial Killings ...... I would be dead in a week ... these people are simply too powerful to fight and try to expose ... "... the chilling words of Sarah Anne McMahon before she disappeared on 8th October, 2000...... because of what Sarah Anne McMahon knew about who was involved in the Claremont Serial Killings and how and why they happened ......

A.N. HOPE WA STATE CORONER -stated on the 17 January 2013 that ..."​I am satisfied that the death (of Sarah Anne McMahon) arose by way of Homicide."

"...The even more disturbing and strange situation that neither the Western Australian Police, Government, Director of Public Prosecutions or even the legal team representing Bradley Robert Edwards have been wanting to have the information that Sarah Anne McMahon provided regarding who was involved in the Claremont Serial Abductions and Murders ....many attempts have been made to provide this and other information from the NYT CSK Investiigation Files to all of the aforementioned but none of them were interested see: http://www.wikipediaexposed.org/claremont_serial_killings.html ... just as they are not interesting investigating all the criminal, wrongful and immoral behaviour by people in the police, legal system, politics, powerful business people, the Western Australian Media, The Public Trustee for Western Australia and others set out in the 13 volumes of the series of books titled The Triumph of Truth (Who Is Watching The Watches ?) .

....four of them in the National Library of Australia and the Western Australian State Library.......


certain police are chosen to make sure those responsible for serious crimes are not investigated and charged ..


other police are chosen to make sure a person is charged for crimes they have not committed and thus are told to set that person up on a charge or charges ..... 


even the MI6/CIA run Wikipedia.org made sure that the Wikipedia Page created for the 13 volumes of the series of books titled The Triumph of Truth (Who Is Watching The Watches?) was completely removed from Wikipedia by Wikipedia Editors paid to control what information relating to Perth and Western Australia is on Wikipedia and what is written on Wikipedia about other places, people and subjects .


..also in around 2001, powerful barristers working for the State of Western Australia demanded that the head librarian at the Western Australian State Library to "...completely remove all mention and existence of the volumes of  The Triumph of Truth (Who Is Watching The Watches ?) from the library's index, and put all of the library's copies through the paper shredder" ...... 

he did at the time, remove all mention of these books from the library's computer index and pretended to have put all the library's copies in the paper shredder ...


but the truth is that he hid and the library's copies of The Triumph of Truth (Who Is Watching The Watches ?)  in a box in the library's storeroom ...in recent year they were found and put back on the shelves of Western Australian State Reference Library .for everyone interested to read .......

see: http://www.wikipediaexposed.org/who-is-looking-at-wikipediaexposed.org.html ... 

but the Authorities and the Western Australian Media continue to completely ignore these books and the unchallenged and undisputed facts set out in these books ..... people and organisations would have sued the author and publisher for defamation within the last 20 years these series of books have been on public record if anyone mentioned in a negative light was upset by what has been written in the series of books titled The Triumph of Truth (Who Is Watching The Watchers?) ...........


Nothing short of a Royal Commission with no restrictions as to what and who can be investigated ..... into the Western Australian Legal, Police , Government and Semi-Government Bodies and Organisations, Political, Business, Media, Public Trustee, Criminal World and System headed by an independent QC from overseas for the years 1970 to 2020 ...

will bring to public light all the criminal, wrongful and immoral behaviour by people and organisations in the Western Australian Police, Legal  Political System, Public Trustee, Media. Business and Criminal System, Networks and Organisations and powerful business people living and deceased in Western Australia ... and make sure people and organisations are accountable for such criminal, wrongful and immoral behaviour .. so that there is a clear message given that any such criminal, wrongful and immoral behaviour carried out by people that have powerful positions in the Western Australian Legal, Police , Political, Business, Media, Public Trustee, World and System will not be tolerated in any shape or form ...... "NYT> CSK Investigation Team 

Girl seen getting into unmarked Ute Type Vehicle
Claremont burger boys saw victim hitchhike
Girl seen getting into unmarked Ute Type Vehicle

Ian Stanford, 54, saw a woman getting into a white vehicle ute type vehicle with a canopy, reasonable condition ... no writing on the side of it.

By Angie Raphael
DECEMBER 17 2019
https://www.bluemountainsgazette.com.au/story/6546673/claremont-burger-boys-saw-victim-hitchhike/?cs=939

 Prosecutors allege Bradley Edwards abducted Ciara Glennon in his Telstra-issued white station wagon.
One of the so-called "burger boys" in the Claremont serial killings trial says he saw a woman leaning into a car to talk to the driver on the night Ciara Glennon went missing, while another man said he saw her get in.
Ex-Telstra technician and confessed rapist Bradley Robert Edwards, 51, maintains he did not murder secretary Sarah Spiers, 18, childcare worker Jane Rimmer, 23, and Ms Glennon, a 27-year-old solicitor, in the mid-1990s.

Troy Bond, one of three men dubbed "the burger boys" along with Brandon Gray and Frank McElroy, said they went to the Continental Hotel in the Perth suburb of Claremont on March 14, 1997, then bought food from Hungry Jack's around midnight.

"There was a female walking up Stirling Highway," the 45-year-old told the Western Australia Supreme Court on Tuesday.
"Brandon said to her 'you're stupid for hitchhiking' ... I just told Brandon to be quiet and let her go," he said.
"She stuck her finger up at the three of us."
Mr Bond said he only saw the woman walking and could not say if she was hitchhiking.
Mr Gray said he saw the woman "neatening herself up", continue to walk then extended her arm "in a motion, maybe hitchhiking".
He made a comment to her and she gestured for him to mind his own business, Mr Gray testified.
"She walked like someone you probably wouldn't let walk like that by themselves ... maybe intoxicated," he said.
Mr Bond said he looked up the road as the trio ate their burgers at a bus stop and saw the woman leaning into a white Holden Commodore station wagon, talking to the driver.

Ian Stanford, 54, was a passenger in a car driven by Lisa Mighall when he saw a woman getting into a white vehicle, which he said may have been a ute with a canopy.
"It looked to be in reasonable condition ... no writing on the side of it," he said.
"As we went past the back of the car, the tail gate was up and there was a person holding it up ... I couldn't understand why there was a girl or a lady ... and she was in the process of getting in the back.
"I remember saying to Lisa, 'after what's gone on in this area, I can't understand why someone would do that'."
Mr Stanford said he never saw the woman's face but she was wearing a white top and black skirt.

Several other people have said they saw a woman matching Ms Glennon's description walking alone, with two saying she was leaning against a light-coloured car.

Prosecutors allege Edwards abducted Ms Glennon in his white Telstra-issued vehicle.
The trial has now heard from the majority of civilian witnesses and is taking a break over Christmas until January 6.
The next lot of witnesses will be police and forensic officers, who attended the crime scenes where the bodies of Ms Rimmer and Ms Glennon were found.
DNA and fibre evidence will also dominate next year's hearings.
The trial is expected to finish before mid-2020 and Justice Stephen Hall will then likely reserve his judgment for months before handing down his verdict.
Australian Associated Press

Thinking about the attempted abduction at Claremont Car park, where the young lady was asked, for help, to reach into the vehicle, behind the back seat to locate the “supposed” car keys – about 1994. It was described as a white Commodore.
That’s possibly how JR was abducted. Offering to reach in and locate the keys, then shoved into the vehicle and trapped under the fold-down seats. That may explain how the CSK managed to control her as well as fully conceal her.
JR would have struggled, hence the multitude of carpet fibers on her body.
My apologies I cannot locate the 1994 news article about the keys... These are only my thoughts and opinions

.Canning Vale, Dec 9, 2017

CV & Met mentioned earlier that 50 samples were found on JR.
Extract from ‘Devil’s Garden’, (page 68 in Kindle) also mentions that that there were 50 samples recovered from JR:
[[​IMG]]

Sent from my iPhone using TapatalkSpinnaker, Dec 14, 2017

Re: above article - I have never been able to find out anything about the outcome of what David Boudville reported to police.

It has never been mentioned again. I hope there was some information in the report to help police find SS killer.

Now that there is an accused CSK in jail awaiting trial for murders of Jane Rimmer and Ciara Glennon perhaps

David Boudville could ID him as the man who was with Sarah.

MOOAnnalise, Dec 16, 2017

https://www.websleuths.com/forums/threads/australia-claremont-serial-killer-1996-1997-perth-western-australia-19.358426/page-7

Map of areas scoured by TRG in the weeks after where Jane's body was found body was discovered

A courtroom sketch of Bradley Edwards, drawn on the first day of his murder trial.
During the past two days of the trial, accused man Mr Edwards has at times taken his glasses off while sensitive images and footage are being shown. 
He has taken his glasses off as the photos of Jane's body in the mortuary are being shown for the first time. 
He is resting his cheek on his hand and writing notes. 

Claremont serial killings trial podcast: ‘Missing Sarah’
PerthNow
December 5, 2019 1:21PM

https://www.perthnow.com.au/news/claremont-serial-killings/claremont-serial-killings-trial-podcast-missing-sarah-ng-b881403621z

The voice of Sarah Spiers haunted the court as her final phone call, a call to a taxi service was played during evidence on day nine.
Sarah Spiers was last seen in the early hours of January 27, 1996. She was out with friends at Club Bay View, and just after 2am decided to go leave. Alone. She called a taxi to take her to Mosman Park, but she never got there.
Today, we heard from one of those friends she was out with that night, recalling the final words she ever said to her friend.
The prosecution say, instead of getting home in a taxi, Bradley Edwards picked her up and murdered her.
The court heard from three people who heard screams in Mosman Park at around 3am that night, describing the 'blood curdling screams' that have stayed with them for more than two decades.
It was a highly emotional day, with a statement read out from Sarah's sister Amanda, a court room in tears and a witness consoled as she left the stand after giving her evidence.
Justice Hall said he has decided not to release Sarah's last phone call to the public, because he believed it would cause undue stress to her family. The West's Legal Affairs Editor Tim Clarke was in court and describes the the moment her voice was played for the second time in this trial.

Join Natalie Bonjolo, Tim Clarke and Emily Moulton as they dissect day nine of the Claremont Serial Killings trial.

Claremont serial killings trial podcast: ‘Ten Seconds of Terror’
PerthNow
December 3, 2019 12:11PM


https://www.perthnow.com.au/news/claremont-serial-killings/claremont-serial-killer-trial-podcast-ten-seconds-of-terror-ng-b881401062z

It was massive day in court, with eight witnesses taking the stand, including the woman who was attacked from behind by the accused Claremont Serial Killer Bradley Robert Edwards in 1990, who spoke about her ordeal publicly for the first time.
He pleaded guilty and was convicted on common assault.
As Natalie Bonjolo, Tim Clarke and Alison Fan discuss, her testimony was animated and detailed, and she recounted the terrifying ordeal — now known as "The Hollywood Hospital Incident" — like it was yesterday, the day she said she thought she was going to die.
For the first time, it was revealed that Western Australian Police were looking into Telstra vehicles as early as July 1996, just a month after Jane Rimmer went missing and before Ciara Glennon was murdered.
The court also heard from three other women, known as 'The Telstra Living Witnesses', who the prosecution say had close encounters with a man in a white van driving around Cottesloe and Claremont picking up vulnerable women.

Robert Kays - Former detective worked for the Macro Task Force, the police unit

that investigated the Claremont killings. (ABC News: Hugh Sando)

Accused Claremont Killer Bradley Robert Edwards (Supplied)

Above:

Photos of Julie Cutler. Kerry Turner, Sarah Spiers, Jane Rimmer, Ciara Glennon, Sarah Anne McMahon, who after an over 20 investigations by the NTY Claremont Serial Abduction and Killing Legal and Investigation Team, are believed to be all connected in various ways and should all be considered are part of what the world knows as the Claremont Serial Abductions and Killings 


Possible Related Cases to The Claremont Serial Killings 

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Claremont_serial_killings
It has been suggested by journalist Liam Bartlett that Spiers was not the first victim. Liam Bartlett wrote that police have told the father of a fourth missing woman, 22-year-old Julie Cutler, that his daughter was probably a victim of the Claremont killer. Cutler, a university student from Fremantle, vanished after leaving a staff function at the Parmelia Hilton Hotel in Perth at 9:00 pm on 20 June 1988. Julie Cutler's car was found in the surf near the groyne at Cottesloe Beach two days later, and her fate remains unknown. Other possible cases include that of Lisa Brown (19), a prostitute who disappeared on 10 November 1998, and Sara McMahon (20), who disappeared on 8 November 2000.


Julie Cutler, a 22-year-old woman was last seen at a work function at the Parmelia Hilton hotel in June, 1988. Ms Cutler was reported missing the next day and her sedan was later found dumped in the surf at Cottesloe Beach. Her body has never been found

​Kerry Turner an 18 year old disappeared on June 30, 1991, after accepting a lift in Victoria Park.

​Kerry Turner's body was found four weeks later by a member of the public in bushland near Canning Dam.

Sarah Spiers an 18 year old was last seen on 27 January 1996, after she left Club Bayview in the centre of Claremont at around 2:00 am.

The Western Australian Police are of the belief that Sarah Spiers was murdered and that her body has not been located.  Bradley Robert Edwards was charged with being the sole person responsible for the abduction and murder of Sarah Spiers.


Jane Rimmer a 23 year old was last seen in the early hours of Sunday 9 June 1996.

Fifty-five days later, on Saturday, 3 August 1996, her naked body was found 40 km south in bush-land near Woolcoot Road, Wellard by a family picking wildflowers. 

Ciara G;lennon a 27 year old lawyer was last seen  in the early hours of Saturday 15 March 1997.

Nineteen days later, on 3 April, her semi-clothed body was found by a bushwalker, 40 km north, near a track in scrub off Pipidinny Road in Eglinton.

Sarah Anne McMahon, a 20-year-old was last seen leaving her Claremont workplace on November 8, 2000.

The coroner  at the inquest held for Sarah Anne McMahon made the following findings

FINDINGS IN RELATION TO THE SUSPECTED DEATH
"In the context that Ms McMahon has not been seen since 8 November 2000 and has not contacted her loved ones in the intervening years, I am confident that she is now deceased.
There was no evidence that Sarah McMahon left the country and there are no records held in Medicare, Centrelink, the Australian Taxation Office, the Department of Foreign Affairs and Trade or her bank which would suggest that she was alive in Australia after that time. While Mr Morey has claimed that she is alive, living overseas, he has provided no supporting information or evidence. As Mr Morey is aware of the fact that he is viewed as a suspect by police he has, and has always had, a motive to claim that Ms McMahon is still alive. I do not consider it likely that Ms McMahon decided to leave the country and managed to do so without using her passport and without any relatives or close friends knowing what she was doing. On the day when she went missing Ms McMahon had arranged to pick up her younger sister from the Mount Helena Baptist Church at 8.30pm which she did not do. Her car and mobile telephone were later found abandoned, the car at the car park of the Swan District Hospital and the mobile telephone on the median strip of the Great Northern Highway. The fact that Ms McMahon did not pick up her sister as planned and her car and telephone were found abandoned in these circumstances is sinister and suggests that something untoward had happened to her.
Based on all of the evidence I am satisfied beyond all reasonable doubt that Sarah McMahon is dead.

THE POSSIBLE VERDICTS
"Ms McMahon was a 20 year old woman in relatively good health. There is no reason to believe that she would have died suddenly of natural causes. If that had happened, her body should have been located. Although there is some evidence that Ms McMahon had been depressed on occasions in the period before her disappearance, evidence of witnesses who saw her on 8 November 2000 describe her as being in a happy and positive mood. When she was last seen Ms McMahon was going to meet someone and had later plans to pick up her sister. There is no reason to suppose that she would suddenly contemplate suicide and take her own life. In addition, had the death arisen by way of suicide, that would not explain the disappearance. There is no suggestion that Ms McMahon could have suffered some unforeseen accident and, again, the fact that she has disappeared appears to be inconsistent with the possibility of accidental death. In the circumstances of this case I am satisfied that the death arose by way of Homicide."

THE PERSON OR PERSONS RESPONSIBLE FOR THE DEATH
"In these reasons I have explored some of the evidence obtained by police during a number of investigations into the suspected death, particularly investigations relating to a person identified as a suspect, Mr Morey. A possible benefit served by the inquest is that it has assisted to crystallise where the evidence has been going in respect of a number of issues raised in relation to the suspected involvement of Mr Morey. It is for that reason I have reviewed some of that evidence in these reasons. It is important to recognise that section 25(5) of the Coroners Act 1996 provides:"

A N HOPE STATE CORONER - 17 January 2013

https://www.watoday.com.au/national/western-australia/she-accepted-a-lift-and-never-seen-again-unsolved-murder-of-teen-kerry-turner-20160628-gptg4f.html

The below  informatiom cloured blue was taken from the website www.wikipedia.org on the 12th of November, 2010

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Claremont_serial_killings  .wikipedia.org on the 12th of November, 2010
The Claremont serial killings is the name given by the media to a case involving the disappearance of an Australian woman, aged 18, and the killings of two others, aged 23 and 27, in 1996-1997. After attending night spots in Claremont, a wealthy western suburb of Perth, Western Australia, all three women disappeared in similar circumstances leading police to suspect that an unidentified serial killer was the offender. The case, described as the state's biggest, longest-running, and most expensive investigation, remains unsolved. However, in 2016, a suspect, 

​The case began with the disappearance of Sarah Spiers (18) on 27 January 1996, after she left Club Bayview in the centre of Claremont at around 2:00 am.  At 2:06 am, Spiers called Swan Taxis from a public telephone booth. Although she was living in South Perth with her older sister at the time, she had requested to be taken to the nearby suburb of Mosman Park. She was then sighted waiting alone near the corner of Stirling Road and Stirling Highway by three eyewitnesses, who also mentioned seeing an unidentified car stopping where she was waiting However, she was not at the site when the responding taxi arrived at 2:09 and, in the dark, could have been missed by the driver. Her disappearance soon attracted massive publicity and her fate remains unknown.
In the early hours of Sunday 9 June 1996, Jane Rimmer (23) from Shenton Park, also disappeared from the same part of Claremont. Similar to Spiers, she had been out socialising with friends the night before. Rimmer's friends explained how they had moved from the Ocean Beach Hotel to the Continental Hotel and then Club Bayview. Noting the long line at the club, her friends then caught a taxi home, but Rimmer opted to stay, and she was last seen on security footage waiting outside the Continental at 12:04 am. Fifty-five days later, on Saturday, 3 August 1996, her naked body was found 40 km south in bush-land near Woolcoot Road, Wellard by a family picking wildflowers. 
Nine months later, in the early hours of Saturday 15 March 1997, Ciara Glennon, a 27-year-old lawyer from Mosman Park, also disappeared from the Claremont area. Like the others, she was with friends at the Continental and had decided to make her own way home. Three men at a bus stop saw Glennon walking south along Stirling Highway at approximately 12:30 am, and observed her interacting with an unidentified light coloured vehicle which had stopped by her. Nineteen days later, on 3 April, her semi-clothed body was found by a bushwalker, 40 km north, near a track in scrub off Pipidinny Road in Eglinton.

Bradley Robert Edwards, was arrested and charged for the abductions and murders of Sarah Spiers, Jane Rimmer and Ciara Glennon.- His trial began in November 2019.

No one as at the 13th of January, 2020 has been charged for the abductions and/or murders of Kerry Turner, Julie Cutler and/or Sarah Anne Mcmahon. 

The NYT CSK Legal and Investigation Team are of the understanding and belief that regardless of any involvement that Bradley Robert Edwards had in the abduction and murders of Sarah Spiers, Jane Rimmer and Ciara Glennon .... that a police officer and/or police officers plus a powerful well known Perth businessman were involved in the Claremont Serial Abductions and Killings and that the Claremont Serial Abductions and Killings should also include Kerry Turner,  Julie Cutller and Sarah Anne McMahon along with Sarah Spiers, Jane Rimmer and Ciara Glennon as all been related.


based on their investigations which includes a statement from Sarah Anne McMahon obtained before Sarah Anne McMahon disappeared, believed to have been murdered, with a strong suspect of the murder of Sarah Anne McMahon being Donald Morey, aka Matusevic , who the Western Australian Police also believe that Donald Morey, aka Matusevic  is a stromg suspect of the murder of Sarah Anne McMahon .... 

Paul Yovich,- Edwards's lead defence counsel, is attempting cast doubt over police processes. (ABC News: Hugh Sando)

Claremont serial killer: Taxi clue to Ciara Glennon’s death
JOHN FLINT
PerthNow

January 3, 2015
https://www.perthnow.com.au/news/wa/claremont-serial-killer-taxi-clue-to-ciara-glennons-death-ng-b80af943b3f4b839a9956cdffd1aa3ab
MORE than 17 years after Ciara Glennon’s body was found in dense bushland 45km north of Perth, a local man has come forward with information that puts a taxi at the scene.
The taxi had its headlights off as it turned off Pipidinny Rd, Eglinton, on to Wanneroo Rd in the pre-dawn darkness, the Two Rocks resident told The Sunday Times. He said he had to hit his brakes to avoid hitting it.
The man’s detailed account is supported by his wife, who insists she tried to inform police in the days after Ciara’s body was discovered in scrub off secluded Pipidinny Rd on April 3, 1997.
She claims she couldn’t get through to officers on a special hotline that was flooded with calls at the time. Her husband, Dave, who didn’t want the family’s surname published, said he’d made subsequent efforts down the years to relay his information to police, but never got a call back.
He contacted the newspaper after last weekend’s story about WA detectives reaching out to new people, in an effort to get a breakthrough in the marathon Claremont serial killings investigation. The Sunday Times has passed his contact details to the Special Crime Squad so that he can make a full statement.
The bricklayer, now 62, said about 4.30am on a Sunday morning in March 1997 he was heading south on Wanneroo Rd, from Yanchep to his work site at Nollamara, when he saw the taxi begin turning out of Pipidinny Rd in front of him.
“I saw him and he obviously saw me and stopped,” he said. “I had to brake and pull towards the side of the road. It was definitely a Ford Falcon and it was a grubby thing too. I saw the front more than I saw the side. It was definitely a taxi.
“I thought there might have been someone sitting in the back,” he added.
“I avoided him and carried on.
“I thought it was really unusual ... It was definitely unusual to have a near miss with a taxi with no lights on.”
Though the taxi was angled to turn south on Wanneroo Rd, the bricklayer said he didn’t see it behind him as he carried on down the road. “I didn’t see it again,” he said.
He said it was odd to see a taxi in Yanchep area at that time of a Sunday morning, when there was rarely any traffic around. But he said it was the fact that the taxi’s headlights were switched off on the unlit roads that made it a talking point with his wife that night.
“I had spoken to my wife about it that night, about how unusual it was to not only see a taxi come out of that road, but also without its lights on,” he said.
“Back then the only traffic you would see on a Sunday morning would be the odd crayfisherman coming up to Two Rocks.
“It has stuck in my mind so much because I’ve lived where I live now for 36 years and that was probably the first taxi I ever saw (that far up) Wanneroo Rd. You see them nowadays. But back then you just didn’t see them. You saw them when you got to Wanneroo or even when you got to Hester Ave, but not out there.”
When the news broke on April 3 that Ciara’s body had been found near a track leading off Pipidinny Rd, the bricklayer’s wife remembered her husband’s account of the strange taxi and tried to call the police hotline.
“I tried several times over the next few days but couldn’t get through,” she said. “I just gave it away in the end.”
The bricklayer said that in the intervening years he had mentioned the taxi to police officers he had built houses for and was told they would pass the information to the relevant detectives. And when his daughter became a police officer about seven years ago, he claimed she too passed information to her superiors. “No one got back to me, nobody seemed interested,” he said this week.
“When I’ve been reminded of it, it does bother me. In hindsight it’s a shame I didn’t hit him.”
He added: “I’m absolutely sure about all these facts. The only one I’m not as sure about is which Sunday, but it was around the time (Ciara went missing).”
In 1997, Pipidinny Rd was an isolated beach access road that petered out into a small track just short of the beach at Alkimos. Today, Pipidinny Rd connects with Marmion Ave.
When asked at a Sunday media conference, Assistant Commissioner of Traffic and Emergency Response Nick Anticich said he would not comment.
“Every unsolved homicide is an ongoing investigation for the WA Police,” he said.


KEY DATES AND PLACES:
Saturday January 27, 1996: 18-year-old Sarah Spiers went missing after leaving Claremont’s Club Bay View at about 2am on the Saturday morning, following Australia Day celebrations. She called a taxi at 2.06am from a phone box near the corner of Stirling Highway and Stirling Road. She was not there when the taxi arrived at 2.14am. Sarah’s body has never been found.
Sunday June 9, 1996: Childcare worker Jane Rimmer, 23, was last seen leaving Claremont’s Continental Hotel at 00.04am after a Saturday night out with friends. She was last seen standing outside Club Bay View after she declined a lift home with friends, with whom she had been drinking. Her parents had expected their bubbly daughter for lunch that Sunday at their Wembley home.
Saturday August 3, 1996: Jane Rimmer’s naked and partly decomposed body was found in dense bushland off Woolcoot Road, Wellard, 35km south of Perth, 2km from Casuarina Prison. It had been covered lightly with leaves and twigs and was not visible from the road. The area was surrounded by farmlets and residents said the heart tea tree scrub made it a perfect place to dispose a body.
Saturday March 15, 1997: Ciara Glennon disappeared after visiting Claremont’s Continental Hotel (200m from Club Bay View). After leaving the hotel, she was last seen outside a nearby computer shop on Stirling Highway at 00.15am on the Saturday morning. She may have thought she had a better chance of getting a taxi there. It is believed she was headed to her parents’ home in Mosman Park.
Ciara, a 27-year-old lawyer, who had just got back to Perth from a year overseas and in time for her sister’s wedding, was described by many as “sensible and outgoing.” Friends thought it was improbable that she would have got in a stranger’s car. “It didn’t matter if she’d been drinking, she always kept her head screwed on,” said one friend.
Thursday April 3, 1997: The partly-clothed body of Ciara Glennon was discovered by a bushwalker. It was hidden under branches, but not buried, 40m off Pipidinny Road, 45km north of Perth, on a sandy track that was sheltered from view. The spot was about 2.5km from Wanneroo Road.
Operation Macro detectives told media they believed the controlled killer had used “planned disposal sites”. It was also reported that police believed the bodies of Ciara and Jane were dumped soon after they were abducted from the Claremont nightclub strip.
Police asked to hear from people who may have seen someone acting suspiciously in the Pipidinny Road area in the days leading up to March 15 and until her body was found.
Following Ciara’s disappearance, thousands of taxi-drivers gave saliva samples as part of police screening and more than 1000 taxis were inspected.
* If you have new or relevant information that can help police solve these murders, please call Crime Stoppers on 1800 333 000.

Thanks to Metic the article regarding an attempted abduction within a Claremont car park has been located - circa 1994. A male asked a young women to locate his "supposed" car keys from behind the back seat of a white Commodore. Requesting she help by reaching inside the vehicle, behind the driver's seat to locate his car keys - he then encroached behind the woman. At the same time, the woman's brother approached and the pair fled the scene.
Perhaps whilst attempting different abduction methods, the CSK had intentions of entrapping his victims underneath the back seat. That may explain how the CSK was able to control and conceal his victims.
Upon the floor is carpet and JR was known to have 50 or more fibres upon her body. At a much later date, those fibres were established to be from a VS Holden Commodore.
The image provided is that of a VE Commodore, but similar size as a VS.
These are only my thoughts and opinions.
Attached Files:
Car Key Incident.jpg

Commodore.jpg

For those of you who are unaware, there's an anti-social male incarcerated in the U.K. Mark Dixie is 6' 3" with dark hair too. Dixie was in Perth between early 1996 and 1999. At some stage, during that time, he lived near Claremont and worked as a chef within the Western Suburbs.

https://www.websleuths.com/forums/threads/australia-claremont-serial-killer-1996-1997-perth-western-australia-19.358426/page-3

Folks I do not want to tell my whole story again , I have told it here previously, the short version is this , I was not aware of Noel until my ex wife died .. I typed the name she was buried under into google , which led me to Noel , Bigfooty and webslueths ... Noel has made certain accusations against my former wife and her associates which may or may not be true... But he was factual in a lot of what he said.... He had knowledge spanning years of these people that he could only know if he knew them..... I do not have to claim knowledge about certain things.... I know facts from fiction

tapdancingbear, Dec 7, 2017
https://www.websleuths.com/forums/threads/australia-claremont-serial-killer-1996-1997-perth-western-australia-19.358426/page-3

​TDB - that must have been terrifying! How did he know so much about people? Makes you wonder how many crimes he knew of. I know he had been in jail himself. I wonder if he could have been involved in some way in any of these crimes. Sounds like quite a dangerous person. Had his finger on the pulse. MOOAnnalise, Dec 7, 2017
https://www.websleuths.com/forums/threads/australia-claremont-serial-killer-1996-1997-perth-western-australia-19.358426/page-4

He knew so much about people because he knew them ... he knew things it would be impossable to guess at ... and could only have known if he was told by the person directly... alias names , hobbies for eg .... he also knew about police records and some of the jail time served in other states , you do not just know these things , someone has to tell you ... he also knew about people exiting and returning to WA ... he still had knowledge of some of these people up to about 5 years ago , so he knew them
As for Noel himself ,I do not think he was a dangerous person from what I have learnt ... he did a lot of jail , from juvi jail to adults ,but he was no criminal mastermind ... He was a one eyed part aboriginal with a limp , Noel was not dealt a good hand at being a successful criminal , to easy to identify I think ... I think a lot of Noels jail time had to with him being aboriginal , it was just the way of the world back then

tapdancingbear, Dec 7, 2017

I can only guess , but I have had to guess all through this thing because Noel was not around to ask
I can trace his history with some of these people back to at least 1982 or 83 .... In one of his stories about his life he has himself sitting with them at Ginos café in Fremantle at about this time , the story was written years before the CSK events ... the people he refers to were around Freo at this time so I have no doubt it is true ........ These people were involved in prostitution , drug dealing and drug use ... at least 2 were heroin addicts , I knew all of this to be true long before I knew Noel Coward existed
The 2 known heroin addicts were still addicts in 96/97 , still involved in drugs and prostitution and apart from extensive jail terms in the 2000s still were involved in the drug trade up to 2 years ago
It should not be news to anyone that heroin addicts are involved in crime and Noel would have been well aware of this and probably what crime they were involved in ... The taxi driver he implicated in the CSK case was associated with these people and I think that when taxi drivers were named as suspects it was easy for him to see the possibility of his involvement
Please keep in mind before you discount Noels ideas completely , with one person he has correctly placed her at Ginos in 82/83 and again knows of her release from prison in NSW in 2009... this is a long history he has with this person , I think in a 26 year history with a heroin addict you may be aware of some of their activities ... and he has correctly placed her at different locations at different periods with different partners ... he is not making everything up

tapdancingbear, Dec 8, 2017


TDB - thank you for the information on Noel Coward

.Annalise, Dec 8, 2017

Noel Coward Death Notice - http://www.westannouncements.com.au/obituaries/thewest-au/obituary.aspx?n=noel-coward&pid=174675108
Noel's Memorial Part 1 - https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=iBAF6Z6Eq_I
Stories about Noel: Noel's Memorial Part 2 - https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=o632_2x

Atzomilamber182, Dec 8, 2017

Mention of over 100 unreported incidents.
Post article.

[[​IMG]]meticulously, Dec 9, 2017

Claremont victim seen leaning into a car
DECEMBER 16 2019
Angie Raphael and Rebecca Le May


 The Claremont serial killings trial has heard testimony about the night Ciara Glennon disappeared.

Lisa Mighall said she glanced at a slim woman standing next to a light coloured vehicle, which may have been a station wagon or ute similar to a Commodore, bending over like she was getting in.
https://www.bluemountainsgazette.com.au/story/6544119/claremont-victim-seen-leaning-into-a-car/?cs=9397

Two women have told the Claremont serial killings trial they saw a woman matching Ciara Glennon's description leaning into a vehicle on a Perth highway on the night she vanished.
Former Telstra technician Bradley Robert Edwards, 51, maintains he did not murder the 27-year-old solicitor in March 1997, and 18-year-old secretary Sarah Spiers and 23-year-old childcare worker Jane Rimmer in 1996.
Several people saw Ms Glennon walking alone down Stirling Highway on the night she went missing, minutes after she left colleagues at the Continental Hotel.

Susan Robinson testified on Monday that something made her look twice as she and her husband drove past, saying she saw a slight-built woman leaning towards a light coloured vehicle "talking to somebody".
"I'm certain that he had light brown hair," she told the Western Australia Supreme Court.
"In my mind at the time, I thought he was quite handsome."

Ms Robinson provided a description of the man for a police sketch artist the following month.
Lisa Mighall said she glanced at a slim woman standing next to a light coloured vehicle, which may have been a station wagon or ute similar to a Commodore, bending over like she was getting in.

That model has been referred to several times by other witnesses.
"It was definitely between midnight and 12.30am," she said in her statement.

Margaret Rogers said she saw a woman who looked like Ms Glennon in her headlights.
"She was ambling along and appeared to be relaxed," Ms Rogers said in a statement.
She also saw a tall man with dark hair walking behind the woman, but she did not think they were together.
She described the woman as being aged in her mid-20s and just over 150cm tall, while other witnesses including Patricia Mullan reported seeing a smartly dressed female.

Ann Kennerly said the woman was "a little unsteady" on her feet and may have been intoxicated.
But Angela Rainbow testified she believed she saw Ms Glennon walking in a straight line, not swaying.
"She looked like she was on a mission," she said.
Lynette Steenholdt was also adamant who she saw.
"I saw Ciara Glennon. It was about 12.20am," she said.
"She was holding up her bag ... she was trying to get a taxi."
Thai restaurant cook Phetchara Mombao said she had just closed the venue when her colleague commented on the lone woman's appearance, saying "she may be the next to go".
The court has previously heard three men known collectively as "the burger boys" because they were eating outside Hungry Jacks shouted out the woman they saw was "crazy" for hitchhiking.

Ms Glennon and Ms Rimmer's bodies were found in bushland at opposite ends of Perth, but Ms Spiers has never been found.

Australian Associated Press

Claremont 'burger boys' say they told victim she was 'stupid for hitchhiking' before she gave them the finger, prettied herself up on the side of the road and was never seen again

Bradley Robert Edwards is accused of multiple murders in the 1990s 

The ex-Telstra technician and confessed rapist maintains his innocence 

Sarah Spiers, 18, Jane Rimmer, 23, and Ciara Glennon were killed in Claremont

Three witnesses saw a woman 'hitchhike' on the night Glennon disappeared 
By AUSTRALIAN ASSOCIATED PRESS
PUBLISHED: 10:05, 17 December 2019 

https://www.dailymail.co.uk/news/article-7800779/Claremont-serial-killer-trial-hears-burger-boys-told-victim-stupid-hitchhiking.html

One of the so-called 'burger boys' in the Claremont serial killings trial says he saw a woman leaning into a car to talk to the driver on the night Ciara Glennon went missing, while another man said he saw her get in.

Ex-Telstra technician and confessed rapist Bradley Robert Edwards, 51, maintains he did not murder secretary Sarah Spiers, 18, childcare worker Jane Rimmer, 23, and Ms Glennon, a 27-year-old solicitor, in the mid-1990s.

Troy Bond, one of three men dubbed 'the burger boys' along with Brandon Gray and Frank McElroy, said they went to the Continental Hotel in the Perth suburb of Claremont on March 14, 1997, then bought food from Hungry Jack's around midnight.

'There was a female walking up Stirling Highway,' the 45-year-old told the Western Australia Supreme Court on Tuesday.
'Brandon said to her 'you're stupid for hitchhiking' ... I just told Brandon to be quiet and let her go,' he said.
'She stuck her finger up at the three of us.'

Mr Bond said he only saw the woman walking and could not say if she was hitchhiking.
Mr Gray said he saw the woman 'neatening herself up', continue to walk then extended her arm 'in a motion, maybe hitchhiking'.
He made a comment to her and she gestured for him to mind his own business, Mr Gray testified.
'She walked like someone you probably wouldn't let walk like that by themselves ... maybe intoxicated,' he said.
Mr Bond said he looked up the road as the trio ate their burgers at a bus stop and saw the woman leaning into a white Holden Commodore station wagon, talking to the driver.

Ian Stanford, 54, was a passenger in a car driven by Lisa Mighall when he saw a woman getting into a white vehicle, which he said may have been a ute with a canopy.
'It looked to be in reasonable condition ... no writing on the side of it,' he said.
'As we went past the back of the car, the tail gate was up and there was a person holding it up ... I couldn't understand why there was a girl or a lady ... and she was in the process of getting in the back.
'I remember saying to Lisa, 'after what's gone on in this area, I can't understand why someone would do that'.'
Mr Stanford said he never saw the woman's face but she was wearing a white top and black skirt.

Several other people have said they saw a woman matching Ms Glennon's description walking alone, with two saying she was leaning against a light-coloured car.
Prosecutors allege Edwards abducted Ms Glennon in his white Telstra-issued vehicle.
The trial is hearing from its final civilian witnesses before taking a break over the Christmas period.
DNA and fibre evidence will dominate next year's hearings.
The trial is expected to finish before mid-2020 and Justice Stephen Hall will then likely reserve his judgment for months before handing down his verdict.

 Claremont: The Trial podcast available now
PerthNow
November 28, 2019 12:36PM


https://www.perthnow.com.au/news/claremont-serial-killings/claremont-the-trial-podcast-episode-one-available-now-ng-b881393030z

The Trial podcast available now-‘Claremont
Ever since the shocking deaths of three young women in 1996 and 1997, the unanswered questions surrounding the Claremont serial killings have remained one of the biggest mysteries in WA history.
Any hope of justice in the tragic deaths of Ciara Glennon, Sarah Spiers and Jane Rimmer seemed bleak for more than 20 years, with police coming unstuck and with no sign of a breakthrough.
That was until the arrest of Bradley Robert Edwards in 2016, who was subsequently charged with the trio's murders.
For the past three years, details about the allegations facing Mr Edwards have been in short supply as his case headed towards what has been dubbed the trial of the century.
Listen below as we bring you in to the courtroom and walk you through all the revelations, allegations and talking points as the historic court case unfolds.
Join our team of journalists and legal experts as we break down all the key information from the proceedings in Claremont: The Trial.

Claremont serial killings trial podcast: Everything you need to know bonus episode
Kate Ryan PerthNow
January 4, 2020 


https://www.perthnow.com.au/news/claremont-serial-killings/claremont-serial-killings-trial-podcast-everything-you-need-to-know-bonus-episode-ng-b881425198z

Before WA’s trial of the century resumes for 2020, we take you through the evidence which has been presented so far.
A lot of you have told us the trial jumped around from date to date, so we’ve collated all the evidence and put it in chronological order for you, so you can refresh your memory before jumping into the maze which will be the DNA and fibre evidence.
Starting with the Huntingdale attack, through the disappearance of three women and the discovery of two bodies. Then 19 years after that, in 2016 the arrest of Bradley Robert Edwards, a man who wasn’t even on WA Police’s radar. A Telstra employee and social footy player with a wife and step-daughter.
In this bonus episode, host Natalie Bonjolo, Alison Fan and Tim Clarke take you through the series of tragic and horrific events which ended in the arrest of Bradley Robert Edwards, who no stands trial for murder.

Claremont serial killings trial podcast: ‘A Doctor’s Memory’
Kate RyanThe West Australian
Monday, 13 January 2020 

https://thewest.com.au/news/claremont-serial-killings/claremont-serial-killings-trial-podcast-a-doctors-memory-ng-b881432450z

I could have inadvertently brushed body: Forensic cop
‘Violent’ Karrakatta rape engrained in doctor’s memory
Hair sample under microscope, doctor on horror case

****WARNING: Some viewers may find the content discussed in this episode distressing****

The doctor who examined the 17-year-old who was brutally raped by accused Claremont serial killer Bradley Robert Edwards in 1995 has recalled the horrific injuries the teenager suffered that night.
In Day 23 of the Claremont serial killings trial Dr Amanda Barnard gave evidence saying while she had examined thousands of women during her career as a doctor for the sexual assault resource centre, the injuries inflicted on the 17-year-old by Bradley Robert Edwards almost 25 years ago had stayed with her.

Bradley Edwards pleaded guilty to the rape, in which he abducted the teenager while she was walking to a friends’ house in Claremont on February 11, 1995.
He grabbed the 17-year-old from behind, bound her hands, put a hood over her head and carried her to his van, where he tied her legs, drove her to Karrakatta Cemetery where he then brutally raped the teenager twice.
Dr Barnard, who was working at the sexual assault resource centre at the time told the court how the teenager’s examination was ‘painful and difficult’.
“I think the things that made this particular case stick in my mind were the violent nature of assault by a stranger, the fact that she had been hooded and restrained, the extent and painfulness of her injuries and given the fact of her youth and that she was a virgin,” she said.
But while on the stand, the doctor was quizzed about how she collected samples from the teenager, how they were stored and who she sent them to.
The defence say these samples – which were found to have Bradley Edwards’ DNA on them were cross-contaminated with the fingernail clippings from Ciara Glennon.
But the prosecution say they were never even stored on the same shelf, let alone could be contaminated, and previously called the suggestion of cross contamination an “Exercise in errant fantasy”.
Join Natalie Bonjolo, Tim Clarke and criminal defence lawyer Damien Cripps as they take you through day 23 of the Claremont Serial Killings trial.
If you, or anyone you know has been affected by the content in this podcast, you can contact Lifeline on 13 11 14
Or the sexual assault resource centre on 1800 199 888
Don’t forget to send your questions to
 claremontpodcast@wanews.com.au

Claremont serial killings trial: Live blog of Bradley Robert Edwards’ trial - Day 23
Emily MoultonThe West Australian
LIVE
Monday, 13 January 2020 

https://thewest.com.au/news/claremont-serial-killings/claremont-serial-killings-trial-live-blog-of-bradley-robert-edwards-trial-day-23-ng-b881431535z

Claremont serial killings trial podcast: ‘Handling Evidence’
Kate RyanThe West Australian
Wednesday, 15 January 2020 

https://thewest.com.au/news/claremont-serial-killings/claremont-serial-killings-trial-podcast-handling-evidence-ng-b881434733z

The question of who handled evidence samples from the two murdered women’s bodies will become key in both the prosecution and defence’s arguments.
Today, on day 25, we got our first glimpse of just how in-depth the witnesses will be expected to remember of their dealings with samples.
Forensic police officer Gary Hyde told the court he was present during the day Ciara Glennon’s body was found, he took photos of her post-mortem the next day, and handled several exhibits.
He was responsible for sending off a critical hair sample to the FBI in 1999.
He also told the court he handled evidence which had been tested by key forensic scientist Laurie Webb in 2012, who went on to be sacked in 2016 for cutting corners.
Join Natalie Bonjolo, Tim Clarke and Emily Moulton as they take you through how the evidence was labelled, where it went, as well as discussing Yakka workwear, and why it has become so important to this case.
For more on the Claremont Serial Killings Trial, head to
 https://thewest.com.au/news/claremont-serial-killings

You can send in any questions you have about the trial to claremontpodcast@wanews.com.au

Fibres_Found_On_Jane_Rimmers_Body_were_Lost_then_Found-in_2011_matched_Near_New_at=time+of+CiaraGlennion_Abduction_Matched_Upholstry+Holden_VS_Commodore

A supplied image obtained on Wednesday, November 27, 2019, shows evidence put before the first wife of accused Claremont serial killer Bradley Robert Edwards at his trial in the Western Australian Supreme Court. The woman, whose identity is suppressed, was asked about the types of Telstra van he drove. (PR IMAGE)

The first wife of accused Claremont serial killer Bradley Robert Edwards has testified at his trial, revealing they had an even messier break than first believed. (Supplied)

Map of areas scoured by TRG in the weeks after where Ciara's body was found body was discovered

Information on a former Fremantle Swan taxi driver

http://claremontserialmurders.blogspot.com/p/information-on-former-fremantle-swan.html

The public has not been informed that a Swan taxi driver named Paul Anthony Gajewski (also known as Taxi Tony and from Fremantle) was present at Claremont around the time Ciara Glennon vanished. They have not been informed that serious accusations of corruption have been levelled at senior police regarding this taxi driver and their failure to interview him, despite his presence at the location and time now confirmed. If you have any information regards this person and wish to swap information with myself email me at noel.coward1@gmail,com.

Alternatively, if you presented any information to the police regards this investigation, or to the West Australian press and are not satisfied it was properly investigated I would be keen to hear from you. I have an 80 page file on this investigation. I can also say without fear of being challenged that the more recent Cold Case Review into the police handling of this investigation was corrupted by the Task Force - and in breach of the guidelines handed down by the National Crime Faculty - by withholding from them evidence and information relative to this taxi driver for the purpose of (a) concealing corruption related to the investigation, and (b) to produce a favourable outcome and deceive the public. It has to be remembered that Superintendent Caporn who headed the investigation was promoted to the position of the back of a botched investigation that sent Andrew Mallard to prison for a murder he did not commit - and for which he was allowed to escape without being held to account, and was indeed rewarded with a job position at FESA obtained under dubious circumstances. I say to you I have been pushing these allegations for thirteen years and have evidence of such value that the police will not take any legal steps to challenge me, or allow themselves to be put in a position where I am forced to defend the allegations I have levelled at them.  Corruption runs deep within this state and it should be remembered the three supreme Court Judges were prepared to allow Andrew Mallard to rot in prison until the High Court exposed the travesty of justice and virtually forced a back-down. I also say to you don't trust the WA Press who stand to be sued for millions over their reporting of this - followed by their wilful silence - and are a major player in the cover-up. If you think this is fanciful then challenge me. I won't be intimidated by this police force. I won't be silenced by the media who have failed to keep you informed. When I say to you the families were lied to by this police force I am not deterred should they believe those lies, thus I say to you that former head of the task force (Mr. Caporn) lied to the families regarding this taxi driver. Who wants to discuss it? As of early April this matter will go before the ACC - as it did with the former ACC that proved to be dysfunctional and where charges of corruption were brought against one person before it was scuttled so as not to be further scrutinised. I don't expect the complaint to get past the assessment team and to be blocked from scrutiny by the Commissioner, as it was with the former ACC. I also point out that key staff in the dysfunctional ACC now staff the CCC. Anyone listening. My real Name is Noel Geoffrey Coward. I can be contacted at noel.coward1@gmail.com. I can be trusted with your information or your secrets. Contact me!

Wikipedia Exposed Media - WEM www.wikipediaexposed.org

FREEDOM TO PROVIDE FACTS, INFORMATION, OPINION AND DEBATE WIKIPEDIA EXPOSED MEDIA - TRUTHFUL NEWS MEDIA, ENCOURAGE OPEN DEBATE

Eaglette said: ↑
Hi again Frankie1972 - can you enlighten us with anything that's going on behind the scenes ?

I wish I could but I'm not allow to sorry

.Frankie1972, Dec 16, 2017

Does anyone know how Steven Ross became a person of interest? Could that have been because he reported giving SS a ride in his taxi, the day before she disappeared. He'd told the police about SS being with a tall man with dark hair. I'm aware that he was/is an acquaintance of Peter Weygers who also became a POI. Why was it these two people became POIs?

Canning Vale, Dec 16, 2017

Claremont serial killings trial podcast: ‘The Broken Fingernails’
Kate RyanPerthNow
January 9, 2020 1:14PM


https://www.perthnow.com.au/news/claremont-serial-killings/claremont-serial-killings-trial-podcast-the-broken-fingernails-ng-b881429611z

 ‘The Broken Fingernails’-Claremont serial killings trial podcast
Former forensic police officer Robert Hemelaar gave his evidence for the entire duration of day 21 of the Claremont Serial Killings Trial.
He narrated an hour-long video from Ciara Glennon’s burial site, revealing graphic details and forensic clues as to how police collected and stored DNA samples found on the 27-year-old’s body.
Joined in the studio by forensic expert Brendan Chapman, Natalie Bonjolo, Tim Clarke and Emily Moulton take you through exactly how forensic officers collect samples, and most importantly, how they avoid contamination.
The West Australian: Claremont serial killings trial full coverage
A key piece of evidence was also hinted at during the trial - the fact that some of Ciara Glennon’s fingernails were broken. Coupled with the defensive wounds on her arms, the prosecution said that Ciara fought for her life the night she died.
But under those broken fingernails, the prosecution says was Bradley Edwards’ DNA.
Join the Claremont in Conversation team as they take you through day 21 of WA’s trial of the century.
Don’t forget to send your questions to 
claremontpodcast@wanews.com.au


 Google Search for Claremont serial killings trial podcast:
https://www.google.com/search?rlz=1C1CHBF_enIE849IE849&q=claremont+serial+killings+trial+podcast&tbm=nws&source=univ&tbo=u&sa=X&ved=2ahUKEwjd143yzobnAhXuRRUIHaHdCuEQt8YBKAF6BAgLEAo&biw=1454&bih=900

Barry Mott said it was possible he had inadvertently stepped on Ms Glennon's body. (ABC News: Hugh Sando)

The bushland where Jane Rimmer’s body was found, as seen from the road.

Sarah Anne McMahon 

Claremont serial killer trial podcast: ‘The Missing Hours’
PerthNow
November 29, 2019 11:10AM


https://www.perthnow.com.au/news/claremont-serial-killings/claremont-serial-killer-trial-podcast-the-missing-hours-ng-b881397773z

In what’s already been a week of bombshells, day five, despite being a shorter day, was no exception
Former friends of Bradley Edwards, a couple named Murray and Brigita Maria Cook took the stand.
Mr Cook told of his annoyance when Edwards never showed up to a pre-planned holiday in Dawesville, an hour south of Perth, on March 14 1997 - the night Ciara Glennon disappeared.
He said Edwards told him he was trying to reconcile with his wife, who told the court on an earlier day that he never tried to reconcile with her.
In an eerie admission, Mrs Cook said they had no TV and no radio, so they didn’t know Ciara Glennon was missing.
Join Natalie Bonjolo, Alison Fan and Tim Clarke (in the studio) as they discuss the days’ events, as Tim described them, a reverse-alibi.

Ciara Glennon's body was found in Eglinton three weeks after her disappearance. (ABC News)

Claremont serial killings trial podcast: ‘The Video too Gruesome to be Shown’
Kate RyanThe West Australian
Wednesday, 8 January 2020 12:59PM

https://thewest.com.au/news/claremont-serial-killings/claremont-serial-killings-trial-podcast-the-video-too-gruesome-to-be-shown-ng-b881428713z

On day 20 of the Claremont Serial Killings trial, the court was given a glimpse into the life of Jane Rimmer

through photographs taken from inside her house days after she went missing — to a woman’s life frozen in time.
Images from the 23-year-old child care worker’s house and belongings were shown to the court by former forensic police

officer Robert Hemelaar, who searched Jane’s Wembley flat.
Bills, papers, even a KFC voucher had been left on her dining table revealing the life frozen in time of a young woman

who was never to return.
When Jane's body was found 55 days later, police swarmed the scene. Today one of those officers, former forensic police officer

Robert Hemelaar told in graphic detail how her body was found, and how forensics went about moving her body.
The video officer for police also gave evidence on day 20.
Justice Stephen Hall ruled that the vision he took was too distressing to be shown to the public gallery,

but as Tim Clarke and The West Australian's court reporter Shannon Hampton explain, they didn't need to see the vision

to get a picture of what was happening.
Join Tim Clarke, Natalie Bonjolo and Shannon Hampton as they take you through day 20 of the Claremont Serial Killings trial.

The three victims of the Claremont serial killings (clockwise from top) Sarah Spiers, Jane Rimmer and Ciara Glennon. (ABC News: Liam Phillips)

​​​Jane  Rimmer Last Seen Hitching a lift in Stirling Highway  in the direction of the City of Perth at 12.30 am Sunday Morning 9 June 1996

“Jane Rimmer just said she wasn’t going to go home. She wanted to stay out,” Ms Donovan said.

Jane Rimmer was last seen hitching a lift at 12.30 am in Stirling Highway walking in the direction of the City of Perth

University student Emma Clayton and her friends almost picked up a blonde girl she is sure was Jane Rimmer early on a Sunday Morning 9 June 1996 the morning Jane Rimmer disappeared...." ...'..Miss Clayton (21 years old uni student) said she saw the girl staggering along Stirling Highway, thumb out, hitching a lift at 12.30 am. Sunday 9 June 1996.. Emma Clayton told police about the incident and her description of the cloths Jane was wearing matched that of a police description which had not been released to the media..' ...​ they nearly agreed to give her a lift .. but decided not to .. a decision they now say they regret ......  because if they had given Jane Rimmer a lift that early morning of the 9th of June, 1996 .. Jane Rimmer would most likely still be alive today

Commissioner O'Callaghan's decision to change the forensic unit, he claimed that 50 samples had been taken from Jane Rimmer's body.

'Qualified civilians will take over the role from police officers who have moved up through the ranks from other duties to the forensic section,' Christian wrote.

'It was horrified overseas experts inquiring into the disappearance of three women from Claremont in the mid-1990's that triggered the dramatic action.

They reported to Mr O'Callaghan in 2004 that forensic procedures in WA were way behind international standards.

Among other problems, there were 50 samples recovered from the body of Jane Rimmer that had never been compared with other materials.

Jenny Rimmer is devastated and angry after reading the article. "What's going on here?' Jenny Rimmer asks.

'Why haven't the police told us about this earlier?'

I ask Barclay the question. 'Post newspaper reported that 50 samples were found at Jane Rimmer's disposal site, 'I say . 'Is this fiqure correct?'

I have been told in no uncertain terms by the Western Australian Police that it isn't,  but want to check again. 

 John Quigly the Western Australian Attorney-General states in regard to the Andrew Mallard case:


".... we would first have to appeal to Western Australian judges there would be no Western Australian Court that would overturn his conviction … because the consequences of doing so would be to identify the whole of the Western Australian Police, prosecution and court system as being corrupt … and no Western Australian Judge would have the balls to say that … because Perth is too anal and the tentacles of the system just get tangled around your throat … as you tear one corrupt tentacle off another one slithers around you … and have just got no chance …..."........ John Quigly the Western Australian Attorney

MALLARD - Documentary (2008)
​When I was 19 I became friends with a man named Andrew Mallard, who had just spent the past 12 years in prison. As I slowly unraveled the shocking elements of his story, I felt compelled to make this short documentary. Though in truth, there is so much that I left out due to the magnitude of the case and of the vast twists and turns that I discovered. It contains just a fraction of the full tangled -web of murders and conspiracies that I discovered whilst making it. In the future I hope to tell the full story - and to tell it better than I did. ►Subscribe and click the bell to enable notifications for my new videos. http://bit.ly/DO-NOT-CLICK-THIS
Category: People & Blogs


Statement by Andrew Mallard
“.…These people need to be made accountable for their actions … in my view there was a conspiracy to pervert the course of justice … this is a crime …. Colleen, you are a better police officer than they are … why should these people be above the law … is this a democracy or a fascist state of Western Australia … I ask you …. Andrew wanted to reclaim most of the years that he lost .. Andrew lost most of his 30’s and part of his 40’s  .… Andrew Mallard..


“.. We had a person who was infirm … not insane by infirm … who had been picked up on by a group of very powerful and very dishonest police officers, who had been thrown in jail for the rest of his (Andrew Mallard’s) life .. and lazy old judges bearly with enough energy to lift their fountain pen to write the sentence “Life Imprisonment” frail of judges who were too lazy to properly scrutinize what the police were about … so I said to Andrew .. I actually help Andrew in my arms in prison because no one else could get in there … and Andrew was very very scared at that time he was 10 years into his 20-25 or 30 years that he had to do in prison … he was very frail at that point … so I held Andrew in my arms at that point and promised that so matter how long it took that I would never leave his side …  never..  Andrew asked me if he would ever get out of prison … I replied …well only if we got this case back over to the High Court in Canberra … because although we would first have to appeal to Western Australian judges there would be no Western Australian Court that would overturn his conviction … because the consequences of doing so would be to identify the whole of the Western Australian Police, prosecution and court system as being corrupt … and no Western Australian Judge would have the balls to say that … because Perth is too anal and the tentacles of the system just get tangled around your throat … as you tear one corrupt tentacle off another one slithers around you … and have just got no chance …

We are all produce of the experience we go through. we grow through our suffering .. for example, we grow through the experience of watching our father die … so what I am trying to say is that through this suffering we often grow into the better person .. and I am sure that through Andrew’s suffering that Andrew grew into something bigger and better …

” … Attorney General for Western Australia, John Quigley…


 



“.. Assistant Police Commissioners David John Caporn and Mal Sherville and prosecutor Kenneth Paul Bates were allowed to leave the Western Australian Police Service and the DPP with all their entitlements and certainly did not face any serious punishment the way Andrew would have liked to see …”…. . Colleen  Egan Journalist and author
Statement by USA Reporter… Andrew mallard spent more than a decade behind bars having been convicted of a crime that he do not commit … Andrew was out of prison and living his life… when he was crossing this street in Hollywood when injustice hit him for a second time …
Colleen Egan ….. “ I got woken up by a phone call from a senior policeman who rang up and told me that Andrew had been in a fatal accident in California and it was a hit and run ..
USA reporter… “… Andrew mallard checks both ways and crosses the famous Sunset Strip … then a sudden flash of headlights …. the driver doesn’t stop …. “..
John Quigley ….” .. I can’t tell you the felling of grief that washed over me … I held that man in prison and promised I’d never leave him … I felt  a little bit of me die when I heard this news… “..
ABC News reporter…. “ Andrew Mallard was rebuilding his life when it was tragically cut short ..

Former Assistant Western Australian Police Commissioner... .David John Caporn and former Macro Task Force boss, who was later forced to resign as a Western Australian Police Officer after being accused of helping the Western Australian Director of Public Prosecutions provide misleading evidence to have Andrew Mallard wrongly convicted of the murder of Pamela Lawrence.

Andrew Mallard spent 12 years in prison for a murder he did no commit and sadly was killed in Los Angeles by a hit and run driver in 2019, after receiving around $3 million in compensation from the Western Australian Government after his murder conviction of set aside by the High Court of Australia on the ground that misleading evidence was presented to the court by the police and the prosecutor representing the Director of Public Prosecutions for Western Australia and material evidence was withheld from the court.

It is noted that the Western Australian Police and Prosecutions do not have a good name in regards to honesty in presenting all the material evidence and trials of those charged with criminal offences in Western Australia .... there have been many travesties and miscarriages of justices carried out against innocent people in Western Australia over the last 50 odd years ... some that have publicly come to light and many that have not been dealt with on appeal through the courts.

As soon an internal police investigation was started into the behaviour of former Assistant Western Australian Police Commissioner... .David John Caporn and former Macro Task Force boss,  after Andrew Mallard's murder conviction of set aside by the High Court of Australia .... David John Caporn immediately resigned from the Western Australian Police Service as a way of stopping the internal police investigation into his behaviour as a police officer, and through  David John Caporn's strong Freemason contacts was the next day appointed as the head of the Western Australian Fire Service on yearly salary of $100,000. It was the opinion of Andrew Mallard and his legal advisors that David John Caporn and KEN Bates, the senior prosecutor in the wrongful conviction of Andrew Mallard for murder, has conceded he failed to comply with his duty to disclose that the victim's injuries did not match a wrench alleged to have been used in the crime.

KEN Bates, the senior prosecutor in the wrongful conviction of Andrew Mallard for murder, has conceded he failed to comply with his duty to disclose that the victim's injuries did not match a wrench alleged to have been used in the crime.


​A REPRIMAND, a $10,000 fine and $3,500 in costs were the penalties for Perth prosecutor Ken Bates after the WA State Administrative Tribunal pinged him for unsatisfactory professional conduct. 
In his 1995 prosecution of Andrew Mallard for murder Bates had fallen "substantially short of the standard of professional conduct observed by competent and reputable lawyers". 
Bates failed to disclose evidence, failed to determine whether there was a reasonable evidentiary foundation to support a material submission of fact, and failed to lead crucial evidence. 


However,  this did not stop Ken Bates a well-connected Freemason in 2009, receiving a $381,791.30 payout plus leave entitlements when he resigned as second-in-charge of the office of the DPP. 


KIRBY J
I agree with the joint reasons that, once the correct approach is adopted and the evidence at trial analysed, this is not a case where the proviso should be applied. For the reasons stated, and to bring this protracted saga closer to finality, the proper course is for this Court to dispose of the proceedings and not to remit them for a third hearing in the Court of Criminal Appeal.
It is important to consider the cumulative effect of the non-disclosure or suppression of material evidence in the hands of the police and thus available to the prosecution. It is the cumulation, variety, number and importance of such evidence that is critical to my conclusion that a miscarriage of justice occurred in Mallard's trial.



http://netk.net.au/Australia/Mallard.asp
​Mallard case prosecutor fined
By PAIGE TAYLOR
THEAUSTRALIAN
https://www.theaustralian.com.au/news/nation/mallard-case-prosecutor-fined/news-story/415aae3f60ca0abfa6eb865705967597

KEN Bates, the senior prosecutor in the wrongful conviction of Andrew Mallard for murder, has conceded he failed to comply with his duty to disclose that the victim's injuries did not match a wrench alleged to have been used in the crime.
Mr Bates has been fined $10,000 in the State Administrative Tribunal following an allegation brought by the Legal Profession Complaints Committee that he engaged in unsatisfactory professional conduct as a prosecutor on behalf of the crown during the 1995 trial of Mr Mallard. The fine was imposed as part of consent orders, submitted by both sides after mediation.
Mr Mallard spent 12 years in jail for the wilful murder of Perth jeweller Pamela Lawrence before he was exonerated.
A sketch of a wrench drawn by Mr Mallard was an important part of the prosecution's case. But Lawrence's injuries did not support a theory that she was killed with a wrench. A fresh police investigation in 2006 matched a partial palm print at the Lawrence murder scene to another man; convicted killer Simon Rochford. Soon after being interviewed in Albany Regional Prison about Lawrence's death, Rochford returned to his cell and killed himself.
A written judgment by the State Administrative Tribunal states that both sides in the case of the complaint against Mr Bates agree on some basic facts about what Mr Bates did.
Specifically, the parties agree that Mr Bates "failed to comply with his duty of disclosure as a prosecutor in that he failed to disclose to Mr Mallard or his counsel, from in or around late September 1995 until the conclusion of the trial, what he was told by Detective Sergeant Brandham about Mrs Lawrence's injuries not matching the wrench in the sketch".
"The failure . . . occurred in circumstances where the likelihood of the wrench in the sketch being the murder weapon was of central importance to the prosecution case as advanced in opening at the trial," the judgment states.

Vicky Young- Homicide detective  was one of the first police officers to visit the site

where Jane Rimmer's body lay. (ABC News: Hugh Sando)

Bradley Edwards denies murdering Sarah Spiers, Jane Rimmer and Ciara Glennon. (ABC News: Anne Barnetson)

Claremont serial killings trial: Victim Ciara Glennon ‘seen leaning into a car’
Angie Raphael and Rebecca Le May
AAP
December 16, 2019 

https://www.perthnow.com.au/news/court-justice/claremont-serial-killings-trial-victim-ciara-glennon-seen-leaning-into-a-car-ng-b881413149z


Two women have told the Claremont serial killings trial they saw a woman matching Ciara Glennon's description leaning into a vehicle on a Perth highway on the night she vanished.
Former Telstra technician Bradley Robert Edwards, 51, maintains he did not murder the 27-year-old solicitor in March 1997, and 18-year-old secretary Sarah Spiers and 23-year-old childcare worker Jane Rimmer in 1996.

Several people saw Ms Glennon walking alone down Stirling Highway on the night she went missing, minutes after she left colleagues at the Continental Hotel.
Susan Robinson testified on Monday that something made her look twice as she and her husband drove past, saying she saw a slight-built woman leaning towards a light coloured vehicle "talking to somebody".
"I'm certain that he had light brown hair," she told the Western Australia Supreme Court.
"In my mind at the time, I thought he was quite handsome."
Ms Robinson provided a description of the man for a police sketch artist the following month.

Lisa Mighall said she glanced at a slim woman standing next to a light coloured vehicle, which may have been a station wagon or ute similar to a Commodore, bending over like she was getting in.
That model has been referred to several times by other witnesses.
"It was definitely between midnight and 12.30am," she said in her statement.

Margaret Rogers said she saw a woman who looked like Ms Glennon in her headlights.
"She was ambling along and appeared to be relaxed," Ms Rogers said in a statement.
She also saw a tall man with dark hair walking behind the woman, but she did not think they were together.
She described the woman as being aged in her mid-20s and just over 150cm tall, while other witnesses including Patricia Mullan reported seeing a smartly dressed female.

Ann Kennerly said the woman was "a little unsteady" on her feet and may have been intoxicated.
But Angela Rainbow testified she believed she saw Ms Glennon walking in a straight line, not swaying.
"She looked like she was on a mission," she said.

Lynette Steenholdt was also adamant who she saw.
"I saw Ciara Glennon. It was about 12.20am," she said.
"She was holding up her bag ... she was trying to get a taxi."

Thai restaurant cook Phetchara Mombao said she had just closed the venue when her colleague commented on the lone woman's appearance, saying "she may be the next to go".
The court has previously heard three men known collectively as "the burger boys" because they were eating outside Hungry Jacks shouted out the woman they saw was "crazy" for hitchhiking.

Ms Glennon and Ms Rimmer's bodies were found in bushland at opposite ends of Perth, but Ms Spiers has never been found.

Claremont serial killings trial podcast: ‘The Scream That Suddenly Stopped’
The West Australian
Thursday, 12 December 2019 1:11PM

https://thewest.com.au/news/claremont-serial-killings/claremont-serial-killings-trial-podcast-the-scream-that-suddenly-stopped-ng-b881410343z
 
‘The Scream That Suddenly Stopped’-Claremont serial killings trial podcast
The night Jane Rimmer disappeared, on June 9, 1996, two couples - separately - heard blood-curdling, ’traumatic’ screams.
One witness recalled hearing a scream that just suddenly stopped. Then silence.
The two couples lived in the then-rural area on the outskirts of Perth called Wellard.
55 days later Jane’s body would be found in bushland in between their houses.
As The West’s Emily Moulton - who has been live blogging the court proceedings - explains, one couple remembered a smell coming from just off the road as they regularly drove past. They said they dismissed it as a dead animal.
Day 14 of the Claremont Serial Killings trial also recounted Ciara Glennon’s final night.
She was the last woman to go missing. She had only been home for two weeks from 6 months abroad when she disappeared.
Her parents were on high alert at this stage in March 1997, with two girls missing and one their bodies having been found, as soon as they reported their daughter missing, police swooped.

Join Natalie Bonjolo, Emily Moulton and Tim Clarke as they discuss day 14.

Con Bayens, former head of a WA prostitution taskforce, says he could have met the Claremont killer

Claremont serial killings trial podcast: ‘The Lock of Hair’
Kate RyanThe West Australian
Tuesday, 14 January 2020 12:54PM


https://thewest.com.au/news/claremont-serial-killings/claremont-serial-killings-trial-podcast-the-lock-of-hair-ng-b881433636z

Following Jane Rimmer’s post-mortem, the pathologist who carried it out gave one of the detectives a lock of Jane’s hair.
The detective, Vicky Young then washed, brushed and placed an elastic around it and gave it to the Rimmer family.
During her evidence today, she said it was an ‘act of compassion’. But she also said the hair was covered in fluids and matter when it was given to her.
On the podcast for day 24 of the Claremont Serial Killings trial, Alison Fan, Tim Clarke and Natalie Bonjolo discuss this act of kindness, and whether this could have an impact in the case against Bradley Edwards.
In a massive day of WA’s trial of the century, several police officers were questioned, including the first Macro Taskforce detective, who organised a massive search - which included TRG officers - of the Wellard area following the discovery of Jane Rimmer’s body, for Sarah Spiers.
But they didn’t find anything. Sarah still has never been found.
Also today, for Sergeant Barry Mott revealed he drove to Jane Rimmer’s crime scene in a station wagon, the type of car the prosecution says Bradley Edwards used when the murders happened, and fibres from it which were found in both Jane Rimmer and Ciara Glennon’s bodies.
Join the Claremont in Conversation podcast team as they discuss why this new information may be an obstacle for the prosecution.
Rimmer family given lock of hair in ‘act of compassion’
Fibre evidence in doubt as cop reveals Commodore link
Detectives hoped to find Spiers in Rimmer search
Following Jane Rimmer’s post-mortem, the pathologist who carried it out gave one of the detectives a lock of Jane’s hair.
The detective, Vicky Young then washed, brushed and placed an elastic around it and gave it to the Rimmer family.
During her evidence today, she said it was an ‘act of compassion’. But she also said the hair was covered in fluids and matter when it was given to her.
On the podcast for day 24 of the Claremont Serial Killings trial, Alison Fan, Tim Clarke and Natalie Bonjolo discuss this act of kindness, and whether this could have an impact in the case against Bradley Edwards.
In a massive day of WA’s trial of the century, several police officers were questioned, including the first Macro Taskforce detective, who organised a massive search - which included TRG officers - of the Wellard area following the discovery of Jane Rimmer’s body, for Sarah Spiers.
But they didn’t find anything. Sarah still has never been found.
Also today, for Sergeant Barry Mott revealed he drove to Jane Rimmer’s crime scene in a station wagon, the type of car the prosecution says Bradley Edwards used when the murders happened, and fibres from it which were found in both Jane Rimmer and Ciara Glennon’s bodies.
Join the Claremont in Conversation podcast team as they discuss why this new information may be an obstacle for the prosecution.
Don’t forget to send your questions to
 claremontpodcast@wanews.com.au

Claremont serial killings trial podcast: The third wheel
PerthNow
December 8, 2019 3:36AM

 
https://www.perthnow.com.au/news/claremont-serial-killings/claremont-serial-killings-trial-podcast-the-third-wheel-ng-b881405226z

 The third wheel- Claremont serial killings trial podcast
In this bonus episode we take you through the evidence given by the man now known as the ‘third wheel’ in Bradley Robert Edwards’ marriage to his first wife.
We explore the bizarre living arrangements, affair and pregnancy that the prosecution alleges led to the ‘emotional turmoil’ that caused Mr Edwards to kill Sarah Spiers, Jane Rimmer and Ciara Glennon.
Salacious and intimate details were revealed in court, as the man who came in between the accused Claremont serial killer and his first wife gave his evidence.

Join Natalie Bonjolo, Tim Clarke and Alison Fan as they dissect the significance of the ‘third wheel’.

 Claremont serial killings trial podcast: ‘The Karrakatta Rape’
PerthNow
December 9, 2019 12:57PM


https://www.perthnow.com.au/news/claremont-serial-killings/claremont-serial-killings-trial-podcast-the-karrakatta-rape-ng-b881406673z

 ‘The Karrakatta Rape’- Claremont serial killings trial podcast
The terrifying, graphic and distressing account of a regular night-turned living nightmare of a teenager, who was abducted and raped by

Bradley Edwards, was read to the court on day 11 of his murder trial.
In February 1995, the 17-year-old was walking to a friends’ house from a night out in Claremont, when she was grabbed from behind,

a cloth was shoved in her mouth, her hands were tied and a hood placed over her head.
Completely helpless, she was carried to a car, driven to a cemetery and raped.
Bradley Edwards was charged with her rape, along with the three murders in 2016, but up until this year had always maintained his innocence.

That was until three weeks before his trial, he pleaded guilty to the rape.
Today, the victim’s words - taken from a police statement days after the attack - echoed through the courtroom, and even though it was read

out by the lead prosecutor Carmel Barbagallo, as Tim Clarke explains, he’s sure almost everyone in that room was affected by her harrowing, and graphic account.
We know Bradley Edwards is a rapist, but the prosecution want to argue he's also a murderer, and her statement will help them try to prove that.
In this episode, hear the defence argument that shocked the podcast team.

**WARNING: this episode contains distressing content***

John Quigley_Attorney General for Western Australia 

Claremont serial killings trial podcast: ‘How the killings changed Claremont’
Kate RyanThe West Australian
Sunday, 29 December 2019 5:58AM

https://thewest.com.au/news/claremont-serial-killings/claremont-serial-killings-trial-podcast-how-the-killings-changed-claremont-ng-b881421225z
 
‘How the killings changed Claremont’-Claremont serial killings trial podcast
Claremont was the go-to destination for young people wanting to be seen.
Every weekend the pubs and clubs were packed.
Some of WA’s wealthiest called Claremont home.
And it was safe.
But a rape, followed by three murders, changed that. All of the victims were out in this affluent suburb, on their own.
Within the space of nine months, Claremont would never be the same.
Women stayed in packs and men worried they’d be suspected of these horrible crimes.
While Northbridge, another entertainment district of Perth became popular instead.
Even some 20 years later, before an arrest, “The Claremont Serial Killer” was someone generations of West Australians grew up fearing. The killer could still be out there.
The West Australian: Claremont serial killings trial full coverage
Veteran journalist Alison Fan raised her kids in Claremont, covered this case extensively and even helped search for Sarah Spiers, Jane Rimmer then Ciara Glennon. She grieved with both the Rimmers and Glennons when sadly, their daughters were found murdered.
Alison even interviewed the man police tailed for years as their prime suspect.
Claremont In Conversation host Natalie Bonjolo was in her 20s and going to the same pubs and clubs where the girls disappeared from.
Never letting her friends go home alone, wanting to stay in a pack, she tells of the fear bubble which surrounded Claremont that didn’t exist anywhere else.
In this bonus episode, join Natalie, Alison and Criminal defence lawyer Damien Cripps as they tell their stories of being around Claremont at the time of these crimes, and how it changed a suburb and a State forever.
Tell us your stories from Claremont at claremontpodcast@wanews.com.au, and stay tuned for more bonus episodes.

There can not no doubt that former Assistant Western Australian Police Commissioner David John Caporn has already been exposed by public evidence that former Assistant Western Australian Police Commissioner David John Caporn was a corrupt police officer who abused his position as a police officer …  There is also the matter of former Assistant Western Australian Police Commissioner David John Caporn being accused of being involved in the stopping of the investigations in the allegations of sexual abuse of a young girl …. against well known Perth, footballer, Barry Cable ….

It seems clear that former Assistant Western Australian Police Commissioner David John Caporn has been given the Green Light to be involved in any criminal behaviour without fear of criminal investigation against former Assistant Western Australian Police Commissioner David John Caporn and without fear of being charged with any criminal offense… there is a lot more the NYT CSK Investigation Team can say about the criminal activities of former Assistant Western Australian Police Commissioner David John Caporn which will be brought up in due course ….

“To win Andrew Mallard’s High Court appeal would have to expose serious police corruption and that the police do everything to cover their tracks of corrupt behaviour and that if I helped Andrew Mallard to expose serious police corruption  that these corrupt Western Australian Police would go for my gutz…” ….. John Quigley, the Attorney General For Western Australia …
“ I have just seen a gross case of injustice against Andrew Mallard where three Supreme Court Judges refused Andrew Mallard’s Full Court Appeal which was based on the fact that material evidence has been held back by the police …
The appeal went on for 26 hearing days … which was unheard of… normally appeals will be heard over or two days at the most … so the three appeal judges got to hear everything .. the appeal was very well presented by Malcolm McCusker and his team … and all three judges at the end went on to say no ... "we dismiss the appeal "…

I walked out of that court and thought that I must be the biggest idiot on the planet I have just seen a gross case of injustice against Andrew Mallard where three Supreme Court Judges refused Andrew Mallard’s Full Court Appeal that should have led to a retrial … and all three judges say no …”
 
“.. We had a person who was infirm … not insane by infirm … who had been picked upon by a group of very powerful and very dishonest police officers, who had been thrown in jail for the rest of his (Andrew Mallard’s) life .. and lazy old judges bearly with enough energy to lift their fountain pen to write the sentence “Life Imprisonment” frail of judges who were too lazy to properly scrutinize what the police were about … so I said to Andrew .. I actually help Andrew in my arms in prison because no one else could get in there … and Andrew was very very scared at that time he was 10 years into his 20-25 or 30 years that he had to do in prison … he was very frail at that point … so I held Andrew in my arms at that point and promised that so matter how long it took that I would never leave his side … never.. Andrew asked me if he would ever get out of prison … I replied …well only if we got this case back over to the High Court in Canberra … because although we would first have to appeal to Western Australian judges there would be no Western Australian Court that would overturn his conviction … because the consequences of doing so would be to identify the whole of the Western Australian Police, prosecution and court system as being corrupt … and no Western Australian Judge would have the balls to say that … because Perth is too anal and the tentacles of the system just get tangled around your throat … as you tear one corrupt tentacle off another one slithers around you … and have just got no chance …

"...We are all product of the experience we go through . we grow through our suffering .. for example, we grow through the experience of watching our father die … so what I am trying to say is that through this suffering we often grow into the better person .. and I am sure that through Andrew’s suffering that Andrew grew into something bigger and better … ” … Attorney General for Western Australia, John Quigley…

Andrew Mallard Set up of a false murder charge by the former Assistant Western Australian Police Commissioner David John Caporn and senior Western Australian Director of Public Prosecutions  prosecutor Kenneth Paul Bates and other police officers and the Director of Public Prosecutions for Western Australia

 I was wrongfully imprisoned .. there is a stigma that goes with that ,., and still goes with that … I still get abuse from certain members of the public …. I still get scoffed at etc. …. people don’t know the full story ….. they think I am some sort of psycho … some sort of mentally ill patient … I had done nothing wrong .. I was innocent and I protested my innocence from the word go .. for nearly 12 years I was protesting my innocence constantly and continually because it was the truth …

He would tell me that he never resolved his anger … he
 was always angry about the police and the prosecutors that brought the injustice .. Andrew was probably not for this planet .. the bad luck that Andrew had … he was not a soul that belonged here in some ways…
The Greeks talk about the Goddess Clotho would spin people’s fate .. Clotho was spinning against Andrew from the Get Go …
This whole story is like some Greek Tragedy … the audience thinks it’s all going well … but it all turns to mud …
Perth, 24th May 1994
Pamela Lawrence was violently murdered by someone else other than Andrew Mallard… who was deliberately set up to be wrongfully charged and wrongfully prosecuted by Freemason Police Officers and prosecutors, which included the former Assistant Western Australian Police Commissioner David John Caporn and senior WA DPP prosecutor Kenneth Paul Bates who Andrew Mallard supported by the ruling of the High Court and the Western Australian Corruption Commission … deliberately produced misleading evidence and withheld material evidence at Andrew Mallard’s murder trial which Andrew Mallard has always publicly claimed was … “… a serious criminal conspiracy to pervert the course of justice committed by former Assistant Western Australian Police Commissioner David John Caporn and senior WA DPP prosecutor Kenneth Paul Bates ……. and they should have been arrested and prosecuted for such a serious crime …. why are they allowed to get away with such criminal behaviour which destroyed and my family’s life ?…”


“.. we found that a lot of the information Andrew provided in the video interview with the police  was information fed to him by the undercover officer Gary … and fed to him by the detectives that were interviewing Andrew …”

“.. a report that had said they had done a test on a pigs head .. which showed that a wrench could not have inflicted those injuries of Pamela Lawrence … while all the while the prosecutor had marked and read and deliberately kept this information from the court .. this was something that a lawyer should never ever do ….”  … Attorney General for Western Australia, John Quigley…

“... over the course of my life, I had suffered from a behavioral situation where I would acquiesce … I would try to please people …”.. Andrew Mallard
“... and in fact that in the statement of facts to the prosecution certain police officers state their concerns that they did not think that I was the murdered anyway ….it’s in the statement of facts to the prosecution ”… Andrew Mallard

“... I have 3-4 years of psychotherapy to deal with post-dramatic stress .. for someone that has been found innocent after they have been wrongfully convicted there is no provision in the system for that .. you ate just spat out … you are spat out …. put are just spat out by the Belly of the Beast …. so to speak …. when I was first released … I used to have serious panic attacks … you have to remember I was still the prime suspect and thus people would give me a wide birth anyway … I hope that I am able to change things in the police and justice system .."...I never believed that I was incarcerated for the rest of my life, simply because I was innocent. ...

Guys wearing suits came dashing across the road to me pulled me out of my seat and threw me over the bonnet of the car … handcuffed me and finally shoved me into the back seat of a police car … a detective sat either side of me on the back seat of the police car, then my head was violently pushed between my knees, and the next time I hear is the cocking of a weapon ... which I recognized as a gun from the time I spent in the army and a pistol was shoved into my face … "..... words spoken by Andrew Mallard.

"... I was determined to stay forward ... keep my head forward and keep going forward ... and I did that ,,,, " words spoken by Andrew Mallard.

“ … I hope that I am able to change things in the police and justice system .." .... I don't believe that there is an infallible justice system or an infallible police service because you are dealing with people .... and people make mistakes and people can be bad as I juust said .. lawyers and police not only have a legal duty but also a moral duty to us the public and that is a very very difficult job and position to be in …  so I have great profound respect for the police service and the justice system and lawyers as a whole, bit it is the people factor that always throws a wrench into the system …  , " words spoken by Andrew Mallard.

“...We tend to be brought up that the police and the justice system is just .. we have a justice system that carries out the law .. but I have serious doubts that the justice system is entirely just …”

Andrew Mallard: Wrongfully jailed for 12 years

Andrew Mallard's wrongful murder conviction
"...I never believed that I was incarcerated for the rest of my life, simply because I was innocent. ... the detectives sat either side of me on the back seat of the police car, then my head was violently pushed between my knees, and the next time I hear is the coking of a weapon ... "..... words spoken by Andrew Mallard.
"... I was determined to stay forward ... keep my head forward and keep going forward ... and I did that ,,,, " words spoken by Andrew  Mallard.

" .... I don't believe that there is an infallible justice system or an infallible police service because you are dealing with people .... and people make mistakes ... " words spoken by Andrew Mallard.

"... I never look at the experience that I suffered as a negative thing ...  it made me a better person for it ... 

Andrew Mallard sat for 12 years behind bars and become the subject of documentaries and legal fights until his wrongful conviction was overturned and Andrew Mallard was set free in 2006 .... this documentary the unmaking of a Murdered was released a couple of years later ... 

Andrew Mallard spoke with Anne with his love of art and his desire to have a family ... his family says that it was that desire that brought Andrew Mallard to Los Angeles ... Andrew mallard came to Los Angeles this week to visit his fiance,... but while walking across Sunset Strip Boulevard in Los Angeles, but Andrew Mallard was struck and killed by a car yesterday morning ... not Andrew Mallard's family are on the fight for justice .. the driver of the car didn't stop and LAP Police are still trying to find that person ... Andrew Mallard's sister in Australia has told the media in Australia  that ..." they're heartbroken to have lost Andrew twice ..."

But those who know Andrew Mallars say that his ability to forgive will be his legacy and a lesson for us all ..... 

Right now police are looking for any information as to who killed Andrew Mallard .... again it happened here on Sunset Boulevard early Thursday morning ... they don't have a description of the car or the driver, but they are hoping that so much video footage and businesses here that something will lead the police to Andrew Mallard's killer 

Jane Rimmer was last sighted by 4 University Students at 12.30 am Sunday Morning the 9th June, 1996,

which was around 30 minutes after Jane Rimmer was caught on the Claremont Hotel Security Camera at around 12 PM 8th June, 1996

“Jane Rimmer just said she wasn’t going to go home. She wanted to stay out,” Ms Donovan said. about the conversation she had with her friend Jane Rimmer before they left the Claremont Hotel. Is seems that Jane Rimmer was determined to part on in the City of Perth and was seen trying to hitch a lift down Stirling Highway in the direction of the City of Perth.

Claremont serial killings trial podcast: ‘The Sliding Doors Moments’
PerthNow
December 4, 2019 12:41PM


https://www.perthnow.com.au/news/claremont-serial-killings/claremont-serial-killings-trial-podcast-the-sliding-doors-moments-ng-b881402340z

‘The Sliding Doors Moments’- ‘Claremont serial killings trial podcast
A taxi driver who accepted a job at 2am, a man who saw a lone woman on the side of the road, and the missing minutes of the last time Sarah Spiers was ever seen.
Three minutes was all it took for the 18-year-old to disappear. She called for a taxi at 2.03am on January 27, by the time the taxi arrived at 2.06am, she was gone.
Day eight of WA's trial of the century tried to shed some light on that time, with the taxi driver who was supposed to pick her up taking the stand, as well as a man who could have been the last person to have ever seen Sarah Spiers in a 15-second glance.
The day also heard from more women who say they had encounters with a man in a white Telstra van in the mid-1990s in the Cottesloe and Claremont areas, known as "The Telstra Living Witnesses", and as podcast guest, criminal defence lawyer Damien Cripps explains why it could be a misunderstanding.

Join Damien, along with Natalie Bonjolo and Tim Clarke as they dissect the day's events.

Sarah Anne McMahon

The Contamination Case

[Story image for claremont serial killings trial podcast from PerthNow]
Claremont serial killings trial podcast:

'The Contamination Case'

PerthNow-10 Jan 2020
On day 22 of the Claremont Serial Killings trial, former forensic police officer Robert Hemelaar took the stand for a third day where it was ...


https://www.perthnow.com.au/news/claremont-serial-killings/claremont-serial-killings-trial-podcast-the-contamination-case-ng-b881430525z

6 days ago · 32 min · (29 MB)
https://podcasts.google.com/?feed=aHR0cHM6Ly93d3cub21ueWNvbnRlbnQuY29tL2QvcGxheWxpc3QvMTg4NGYyNTgtMTdhZi00OTJkLWE4OTEtYTczZTAwNzIxMzIyLzVlNWRmMTU1LWZhNzItNDYxYy1hYTE5LWE5ZmIwMDI4NzQzNC9mM2JlYzBkNS0zNmJmLTRkYzMtYmU3My1hOWZiMDAyYWYyODEvcG9kY2FzdC5yc3M&episode=MTE5ODdlOWMtNTJkOS00MjU4LWE2YTEtYWIzZTAwOWQxMTc1&hl=en-IE&ved=2ahUKEwjx1KTkzIbnAhUVUhUIHa1NCmQQjrkEegQIBhAG&ep=6

When police arrived at the scenes where Jane Rimmer and Ciara Glennon’s bodies had been dumped, They didn’t have to wear gloves to prevent cross contamination.
On day 22 of the Claremont Serial Killings trial, former forensic police officer Robert Hemelaar took the stand for a third day where it was revealed there wasn’t a big focus on preserving a crime scene in the mid 1990s.
He said there was no protocol for wearing gloves and covers for their boots, only that gloves should be worn while handling ‘deceased matter’, for their own safety.
During his cross examination by defence lawyer Paul Yovich, Mr Hemelaar admitted he had handled some evidence - a tree branch - with his bare hands.
The court had been told tree branches had been pulled off nearby trees and placed over both Jane Rimmer and Ciara Glennon’s bodies to partially conceal them.
He also said a key piece of evidence, a hair sample from Ciara Glennon which the prosecution says contained fibres matching unique Telstra shorts, the kind issued to Bradley Edwards while he was working at Telstra, had not been videoed while being collected from Ciara’s body. It was revealed that the sample had also not had tamper-proof tape stuck on the container until years after it was collected.
Cross-contamination is the main case the defence has said will provide reasonable doubt about whether Bradley Edwards is the Claremont Serial Killer.
Join Natalie Bonjolo, Tim Clarke and Alison Fan as they take you through Day 22’s evidence, and answer some of your questions.
If you have a question for the podcast team, send it in to 
claremontpodcast@wanews.com.au
You can also find all of the exhibits released by Justice Hall at https://thewest.com.au/news/claremont-serial-killings/claremont-serial-killings-trial-all-the-exhibits-released-to-the-media-in-bradley-edwards-supreme-court-trial-ng-b881415460z

Claremont serial killings trial podcast: ‘Jane’s Last Night’
PerthNow
December 10, 2019 1:40PM


https://www.perthnow.com.au/news/claremont-serial-killings/claremont-serial-killings-trial-podcast-janes-last-night-ng-b881407912z
 
‘Jane’s Last Night’-Claremont serial killings trial podcast
The last pictures of Jane Rimmer alive were shown to a stunned court room on day 12 of WA’s trial of the century.
The images of the smiling and laughing 23-year-old was shown to the people in the court, who watched on in silence for the entire time the videos were played.
Jane was last seen outside Club Bayview in Claremont at 12.04am on June 8, 1996. At the time, the security cameras recorded on a loop, only capturing 13 seconds at a time.
The CCTV shows Jane standing outside the club. The security vision flicks over to other cameras around the club, and 32 seconds later it comes back to that same spot, but Jane is gone.
32 seconds is all it took for Jane Rimmer to vanish.
It wouldn’t be until almost 2 months later that she would be found. Her body found in bushland in Wellard, half an hour south of Claremont. She’d been murdered, her throat cut.
In this episode, Natalie Bonjolo, Alison Fan and Tim Clarke discuss how different this investigation would be if those security cameras flicked over at different times, would we see what happened to Jane on her final night?
The ‘sliding doors’ moments The West’s Tim Clarke has described before have become a theme in this case.

 Claremont serial killings trial podcast: ‘Death Lilies’
Kate RyanThe West Australian
Tuesday, 17 December 2019

https://thewest.com.au/news/claremont-serial-killings/claremont-serial-killings-trial-podcast-death-lilies-ng-b881414485z

 ‘Death Lilies’-Claremont serial killings trial podcast
It was by pure-chance Jane Rimmer's body was found.
A woman driving with her husband and children driving in Wellard stopped on the side of the road after a rooster ran out. Kids being kids, they wanted to chase it.
The mother, Tammy Evans decided to pick some death lilies and out of the corner of her eye, “the biggest death lily” she had ever seen popped into view.
Before grabbing onto it, something brushed her leg. She thought it was a stick, but it was afoot. That was the only feature that assured Tammy that what she had stumbled across was human.
She had found Jane Rimmer's body. While her husband went for help, she said she just couldn't leave Jane and stayed with her until police arrived.

That was August 3, 1996.
The third victim, Ciara Glennon went missing on March 15, 1997. With two women missing and one dead, the state was on high alert.
Then, the day police had been dreading, a second body found.
April 3, 1997, a man looking for wild cannabis leaves came across Ciara Glennon's body off a bush track in Eglington, 40 kms north of Perth.
The headline in the West Australian newspaper the next day said it all: "The State is in Mourning."
He said he thought a kangaroo had died, and being 'nosy' he went to check if a joey was in its pouch, but instead found the body of the 27-year-old.
On the final day of the trial for the year, the court also heard from the men the prosecution called 'The Burger Boys' - one of which yelled to her that she was 'stupid for hitch hiking'
The prosecution reached the end of their 'civilian witnesses', next year will see what has been described as 'the battle of the scientists', the DNA and fibre evidence which is so crucial to this case.
We will be checking emails during the Christmas break, so please send your questions to 
claremontpodcast@wanews.com.au

The knotted cord Bradley Edwards used to tie the rape victim's hands. (Nine / Supplied)

​​​“Jane Rimmer just said she wasn’t going to go home. She wanted to stay out,” Ms Donovan said.

Jane Rimmer upset over ‘weight and looks’ in her final moments- Claremont serial killings trial
PerthNow
December 12, 2019 

https://www.perthnow.com.au/news/wa/claremont-serial-killings-trial-jane-rimmer-upset-over-weight-and-looks-in-her-final-moments-ng-b881409364z

Less than 90 minutes before she was last seen alive, the alleged Claremont serial killer’s second victim was upset, telling a friend she was unattractive.

CCTV footage outside the Continental Hotel just after midnight on June 9, 1996, showed Jane Rimmer leaning against a pillar and looking at her watch.
When the rotating surveillance lens returned 35 seconds later, she was gone.
Lynda Donovan said her workmate was happy early in the evening when they were at the Ocean Beach Hotel with other friends, with the 23-year-old mildly affected by alcohol.
“Not drunk, just happy,” Ms Donovan told Bradley Robert Edwards’ Western Australia Supreme Court trial on Wednesday.
Ms Rimmer “was pretty well on her way” after they kicked on to the Continental Hotel and became upset, so she and Ms Donovan went outside and chatted for about five minutes at 10.40pm.
“She was just really sad and saying that she was ugly and fat and all of those types of things, and I was just trying to comfort her and tell her it wasn’t true,” Ms Donovan said.
The group then walked up to Club Bayview but collectively decided “we’d had enough” and walked back to a taxi rank near the Continental, Ms Donovan said.
But at the last minute, Ms Rimmer changed her mind.
“She just said she wasn’t going to go home. She wanted to stay out,” Ms Donovan said.
Her friends drove past in the taxi as she leaned against the pillar, yelling out “get in ... let’s go” but “she just shook her head and turned away”.
“We said to the driver ’alright, let’s just go then’.”

Under questioning by defence counsel Paul Yovich, Ms Donovan said she could not recall recounting Ms Rimmer having an argument with men at the Ocean Beach Hotel in her police statement.

Ms Rimmer’s older siblings, brother Adam and sister Lee, watched Wednesday’s proceedings from the public gallery.
Edwards is also accused of murdering Sarah Spiers, 18, and Ciara Glennon, 27, in 1996 and 1997.

Edwards has pleaded guilty to raping a teenage girl at Karrakatta Cemetery in 1995. (Supplied: Supreme Court of WA)

Claremont serial killer trial podcast: ‘A Man in Uniform’
PerthNow
December 2, 2019 10:47AM

https://www.perthnow.com.au/news/claremont-serial-killings/claremont-serial-killer-trial-podcast-a-man-in-uniform-ng-b881399799z

As a new week of evidence starts in the Claremont Serial Killings trial, the court took on a different format for the day.
While the court waited to hear from the man who impregnated Bradley Edwards' first wife, two former Telstra employees gave evidence, and they were asked - very specifically - about uniforms.
The West's legal affairs editor Tim Clarke explains why the specific colour of the Telstra uniforms, when they were issued and the process of ordering them is so important to this trial.
Stay tuned to Claremont In Conversation to hear the details of the affair that the prosecution say led Bradley Edwards to kill Sarah Spiers, Jane Rimmer and Ciara Glennon tomorrow.

'She accepted a lift and never seen again': Unsolved murder of teen Kerry Turner
By Heather McNeill
 June 28, 2016

https://www.watoday.com.au/national/western-australia/she-accepted-a-lift-and-never-seen-again-unsolved-

murder-of-teen-kerry-turner-20160628-gptg4f.html


Thursday marks 25 years since 18-year-old Perth teenager Kerry Turner, on her way home from a night out

in the city, accepted a lift from a driver in Victoria Park and was never seen alive again.
On the anniversary of her murder, her father John Turner has made an emotional plea for anyone with information

to come forward, telling Radio 6PR presenter Gary Adshead on Tuesday there wasn't a day that went by that

he didn't think of his beloved daughter.
"With Kerry, she was a bright and bubbly 18-year-old - like they are - beautiful looking girl and she was full

of confidence and had no fear of anything," he said.
"We miss her so much... it's just left a giant hole in our family."
The death of Kerry was the second tragedy for John and his wife Sue, who immigrated to Perth from the UK in 1970 for a better life.
In 1985, their son, Jamie, 18, died after being injected with drugs by a man who was later convicted of his manslaughter.
Six years later, on June 30, 1991, Kerry, their youngest daughter, went missing.
Her body was found four weeks later by a member of the public in bushland near Canning Dam.

Kerry Turner. 
"This particular day, [Kerry] had been in touch with mum and told her she was coming home for dinner," Mr Turner said.
"She rang a bit later on and said there was a change of plans and [Kerry and her friend Kylie] were going out together

into the city, and of course mum said 'be careful', all the usual things that mums say.
"We didn't know that she was hitchhiking, she had a car, we'd bought her a car, but she obviously hitchhiked instead

of driving her car because they were probably going to have a few drinks or something."
When Kerry became separated from her friend, and did not have enough taxi money to get her home,

unknowingly, her fate was sealed.
"The taxi driver dropped her in Victoria Park at a lit up all-night cafe," Mr Turner said.
"She was walking across the street and a car sped up and stopped behind her on Shepparton Road
"The person in the car called out and Kerry turned around and walked back to the car, spoke to the person, and then

got in the car and left and that was the last time she was seen alive that we know of."
Police hunted for the vehicle, described by witnesses as a dark blue car, similar to a Datsun 260C, which had spoked wheels, but came up empty handed.
It was one of the few leads they had into Kerry's disappearance.

"It's just mystifying that she would be so positively walking around the back of the car and getting in [unless she knew the person]," Mr Turner said.
"It's very awful, we think about it every single day, there's never a day that goes by that a thought about Kerry doesn't come into my mind."

Mr Turner has pleaded for anyone with information into what happened to Kerry to come forward.

"Whatever it is, no matter how small it might be... if they've got any information that might be relevant, please bring it forward," he said.
"There is definitely a good chance I think of something coming from the continued and renewed vigour of investigation.
"We remain hopeful and we know that there are people that know something."

Now, back to the Claremont Ghost videos.
It was alleged in the Post that they were uploaded via a server in Lebanon.
IMO the rape and murder of UK diplomat, Rebecca Dykes is unrelated, but you should make up your own mind.

https://twitter.com/alihashem_tv/status/942438935854272512
https://twitter.com/DonKlericuzio/status/942441114212163584
https://twitter.com/DonKlericuzio/status/942443956859756545

Sent from my HTC 2PQ910 using Tapatalkpetedavo.au, Dec 18, 2017


CLAREMONT: The Claremont Serial Killings Podcast
Gary AdsheadThe West Australian
Wednesday, 27 February 2019 4:01PM


https://thewest.com.au/news/claremont-serial-killings/claremont-the-claremont-serial-killings-podcast-ng-b881118296z

The Claremont Serial Killings Podcast-CLAREMONT
Three young women, all missing from the same place, all victims of a killer stalking the quiet streets. The West Australian’s veteran crime and investigative

reporter Gary Adshead takes you inside the biggest criminal investigation in Australian history.
This is the true story of the Claremont Serial Killings.
Subscribe: Apple Podcasts | RSS | Spotify

LATEST EPISODE
Episode 4: The Case Against Bradley Robert Edwards

Claremont: A well-to-do suburb of big homes, imported cars, highly-educated professionals and prestigious private schools. Where residents live in

luxury between the majestic Swan River and the glaring blue Indian Ocean that wrap around the city of Perth on the Western edge of Australia.
High salaries, no crime to speak of, barely a care in the world. Claremont is a lovely place to live. In Perth, it’s one of the places to live.
There is really only one pub to speak of in Claremont. And one nightclub, about 150m away down a street lined with boutique shops.
The nightspots are a magnet for university students and young professionals looking to have fun. Everyone knows everyone, or at least someone who knows them.

In Claremont, there are barely two degrees of separation.
On January 26, 1996, Sarah Spiers headed to Claremont for a night out with friends. Aged 18, she left the nightclub in the early hours and called a taxi from a payphone.

The taxi arrived minutes later. But Sarah wasn’t there.

Her disappearance left her family and friends distraught and an entire city wondering. What happened to that smiling, blonde country girl?

People don’t just vanish from Claremont.

Ten things you need to know about the Claremont Serial Killings
Every story: Full coverage of the Claremont Serial Killings
Breaking news: Keep up to date with news delivered to your inbox

Less than six months later, Jane Rimmer was out, also in Claremont, also with friends, also blonde and smiling.

That smile was evident on CCTV captured inside the hotel that night. Those grainy frames showed the 23-year-old walking through the crowded bar area.

The tape recording cuts away to another camera. When it cut back, Jane was gone.
Two young women missing in similar circumstances from the same location. Police began to worry they were dealing with a serial killer.

When Jane’s body was found in bushland two months later, their worst fears were realised.
Nine months on and Ciara Glennon, a 27-year-old lawyer, was out with work colleagues for a drink. Smart, professional and universally liked, she too vanished.

Three weeks later, her body was found, also dumped in bushland.

CLAREMONT: The Claremont Serial Killings Podcast
Episode 1
A Killer Strikes Twice

https://thewest.com.au/news/claremont-serial-killings/claremont-the-claremont-serial-killings-podcast-ng-b881118296z
It's 1996 and a young, blonde girl stands on the side of the road in Claremont and calls a taxi. By the time it arrives, Sarah Spiers is gone.

A few months later and Jane Rimmer is out with friends in Claremont when she, too, disappears. Her body was found weeks later.

As police desperately hunted a serial killer a third young woman, Ciara Glennon, was snatched and killed. Gary Adshead takes you

inside the Claremont Serial Killings, the biggest criminal investigation in Australian history and a case which haunts an entire city. Published 28 February 2019

Episode 2
Tears, Taskforce and a Suspect

https://thewest.com.au/news/claremont-serial-killings/claremont-the-claremont-serial-killings-podcast-ng-b881118296z
One woman missing, one woman murdered. A city gripped by fear. Then Ciara Glennon vanishes off the streets of Claremont.

As her grieving father takes up the hunt, police launch the biggest murder taskforce in Australian history. But when their focus

narrows on a suspect, the question is asked: have police got the wrong man? Published 8 March 2019

Episode 3
The Wrong Man

https://thewest.com.au/news/claremont-serial-killings/claremont-the-claremont-serial-killings-podcast-ng-b881118296z
As the hunt for a serial killer who has struck three times in Claremont continues, police train a laser focus on one very peculiar man w

ho admits to driving the streets and picking up at least one woman. But the man’s mother says enough is enough.
A TV reporter spends an hour with the suspect in his beachside apartment, quizzing him over the case. She concludes that detectives

are pursuing the wrong man and contacts the father of one victim to share her view.
Now, more than 20 years later, a former police commissioner says that suspect and his family are owed an apology. Published 15 March 2019
Three young women, all missing from the same place, all victims of a killer stalking the quiet streets. The West Australian’s veteran crime

and investigative reporter Gary Adshead takes you inside the biggest criminal investigation in Australian history.
This is the true story of the Claremont Serial Killings.

LATEST EPISODE
Episode 4: The Case Against Bradley Robert Edwards

https://thewest.com.au/news/claremont-serial-killings/claremont-the-claremont-serial-killings-podcast-ng-b881118296z
Claremont: A well-to-do suburb of big homes, imported cars, highly-educated professionals and prestigious private schools.

Where residents live in luxury between the majestic Swan River and the glaring blue Indian Ocean that

wrap around the city of Perth on the Western edge of Australia.
High salaries, no crime to speak of, barely a care in the world. Claremont is a lovely place to live. In Perth, it’s one of the places to live.
There is really only one pub to speak of in Claremont. And one nightclub, about 150m away down a street lined with boutique shops.
The nightspots are a magnet for university students and young professionals looking to have fun. Everyone knows everyone,

or at least someone who knows them. In Claremont, there are barely two degrees of separation.
On January 26, 1996, Sarah Spiers headed to Claremont for a night out with friends. Aged 18, she left the nightclub in the early hours

and called a taxi from a payphone. The taxi arrived minutes later. But Sarah wasn’t there.
Her disappearance left her family and friends distraught and an entire city wondering. What happened to that smiling, blonde country girl?

People don’t just vanish from Claremont.
Ten things you need to know about the Claremont Serial Killings
Every story: Full coverage of the Claremont Serial Killings
Breaking news: Keep up to date with news delivered to your inbox

Less than six months later, Jane Rimmer was out, also in Claremont, also with friends, also blonde and smiling.

That smile was evident on CCTV captured inside the hotel that night. Those grainy frames showed the 23-year-old walking through the crowded bar area.

The tape recording cuts away to another camera. When it cut back, Jane was gone.
Two young women missing in similar circumstances from the same location. Police began to worry they were dealing with a serial killer.

When Jane’s body was found in bushland two months later, their worst fears were realised.
Nine months on and Ciara Glennon, a 27-year-old lawyer, was out with work colleagues for a drink. Smart, professional and universally liked, she too vanished.

Three weeks later, her body was found, also dumped in bushland.
CLAREMONT: The Claremont Serial Killings Podcast
Episode 1
A Killer Strikes Twice

https://thewest.com.au/news/claremont-serial-killings/claremont-the-claremont-serial-killings-podcast-ng-b881118296z
It's 1996 and a young, blonde girl stands on the side of the road in Claremont and calls a taxi. By the time it arrives, Sarah Spiers is gone.

A few months later and Jane Rimmer is out with friends in Claremont when she, too, disappears. Her body was found weeks later.

As police desperately hunted a serial killer a third young woman, Ciara Glennon, was snatched and killed. Gary Adshead takes you inside

the Claremont Serial Killings, the biggest criminal investigation in Australian history and a case which haunts an entire city. Published 28 February 2019
Episode 2
Tears, Taskforce and a Suspect

https://thewest.com.au/news/claremont-serial-killings/claremont-the-claremont-serial-killings-podcast-ng-b881118296z
One woman missing, one woman murdered. A city gripped by fear. Then Ciara Glennon vanishes off the streets of Claremont.

As her grieving father takes up the hunt, police launch the biggest murder taskforce in Australian history.

But when their focus narrows on a suspect, the question is asked: have police got the wrong man? Published 8 March 2019
Episode 3
The Wrong Man

https://thewest.com.au/news/claremont-serial-killings/claremont-the-claremont-serial-killings-podcast-ng-b881118296z
As the hunt for a serial killer who has struck three times in Claremont continues, police train a laser focus on one very peculiar man

who admits to driving the streets and picking up at least one woman. But the man’s mother says enough is enough.
A TV reporter spends an hour with the suspect in his beachside apartment, quizzing him over the case. She concludes that detectives

are pursuing the wrong man and contacts the father of one victim to share her view.
Now, more than 20 years later, a former police commissioner says that suspect and his family are owed an apology. Published 15 March 2019
Episode 4
The Case Against Bradley Robert Edwards

https://thewest.com.au/news/claremont-serial-killings/claremont-the-claremont-serial-killings-podcast-ng-b881118296z
Years pass and with the public losing hope that the horrific mystery will ever be solved, a new suspect emerges.

Telecommunications technician Bradley Robert Edwards is arrested in a dawn raid.
The 50-year-old pleads not guilty and will stand trial for three murders, rape and abduction.
So what is the police case against him? And is it possible that police missed a link that could have led them to the accused man than a decade ago? Published 25 March 2019

Claremont serial killings trial podcast: ‘The Grim Discovery’
Kate RyanThe West Australian
Friday, 13 December 2019 9:34AM

https://thewest.com.au/news/claremont-serial-killings/claremont-serial-killings-trial-podcast-the-grim-discovery-ng-b881411229z

On August 3, 1996 - 55 days after 23-year-old child care worker Jane Rimmer went missing, a woman picking flowers with her family found her body.She immediately told her husband who rushed for help.
Jane’s body was badly decomposed, covered in leaves and small shrubs.
Meanwhile a couple riding horses nearby found a knife on the ground not too far away.
When they reached the woman who found the body, she told them she had stayed with Jane because “she didn’t want to leave her alone.”
We heard a witness break down on the stand today as she recalled that day Jane’s body was found.
We also heard from the woman who could be one of the last people to see Ciara Glennon alive on March 14,1997.
During her testimony, for the first time, we heard about the police investigation and the man who was the prime suspect, subjected to years of being watched by police, pretty obviously as well.
As Alison Fan - the only journalist to interview Lance Williams while he was a suspect - explained, as soon as she finished talking to him, she called the Assistance WA Police Commissioner and told him they had the wrong guy.

Join Natalie Bonjolo, Tim Clarke and Alison Fan as they wrap up week three of the Claremont Serial Killings Trial.