Free Being MeCrusader
I told you I was trouble said: ↑
If there is proof available on this I'd want it exposed far and wide, who wouldn't?
I cannot imagine scientologists (no matter how sucked in to the cult they were) keeping it quiet though ... and certainly not after all these years.
Hubbard was a repulsive creep and I'd not trust him with my dog, but I won't buy this until I see something from more than one reputable, reliable source.
I just cannot imagine that all of his "tek people" would remain quiet and effectively protect him.
I'm with you on that score. Elcon abused and terrorized his kids and the kids of his $cientologists but I've never heard of anything beyond that leading to pedophilia. As much as I absolutely thoroughly enjoy exposing Elcon for the lying vermin he was, I've never seen any dox on this subject.
Free Being Me, Jun 14, 2015
RmackVan Allen Belt Sunbather
I was 'molested' as a child, I guess.
One of my grandmothers waitresses in her Sunland Café in El Paso once grabbed me in the food locker, and said 'You're so cute!' and gave me my first kiss. I was very young, she was, what? thirteen?
I liked it! I tried for the next several weeks to talk her into going back in with me.
Does that make me a bad person?
Rmack, Jun 14, 2015
oneonewasaracecarGold Meritorious Patron
I told you I was trouble said: ↑
If there is proof available on this I'd want it exposed far and wide, who wouldn't?
I cannot imagine scientologists (no matter how sucked in to the cult they were) keeping it quiet though ... and certainly not after all these years.
Hubbard was a repulsive creep and I'd not trust him with my dog, but I won't buy this until I see something from more than one reputable, reliable source.
I just cannot imagine that all of his "tek people" would remain quiet and effectively protect him.
This. So much has leaked about every aspect of his life. Hubbard's lies are laid bare, yet no evidence exists of child sexual abuse.
If there is an affadavit by Andre Tabayoyon, where is it? Why has this not been leaked? It should be available under FOIA.
Also, the ARS story about him molesting his daughter sounds like nonsense to me for two reasons.
1) The dubious idea that the agreement was that this not be discussed while the only living witness is still alive to verify it. Very convenient. Let's only discuss this after any means of verification is possible.
2) The idea that Mary Sue considered their marriage over. She went to prison for him. She was still loyal. This story does not ring true.
oneonewasaracecar, Jun 14, 2015

Free Being MeCrusader
Rmack said: ↑
I was 'molested' as a child, I guess.
One of my grandmothers waitresses in her Sunland Café in El Paso once grabbed me in the food locker, and said 'You're so cute!' and gave me my first kiss. I was very young, she was, what? thirteen?
I liked it! I tried for the next several weeks to talk her into going back in with me.
Does that make me a bad person?
Did she look like this? 
Free Being Me, Jun 14, 201
DeeAnnaPatron Meritorious

I found this: http://www.xenu.net/archive/ronthenut/tabayoyo.htm 
Not sixty pages. Nothing about the rape of a 12 year old Moroccan boy.
DeeAnna, Jun 14, 2015
lotusautonomous rebellous
ree Being Me said: ↑
Did she look like this? 
You gave me a good laugh...
Was a tough job on this thread
Thank you! 
Good hormones for my pain though!
lotus, Jun 14, 2015
RmackVan Allen Belt Sunbather
Just a quick question that will boggle your mind. 'Hopefully'.
Considering all we know about Laffy's misdeeds, did you ever wonder about the ones we don't know about?
I can guarantee you that he was smart enough to hide things from us.
Rmack, Jun 14, 2015
lotusautonomous rebellous
Ingredient to bake a pedophile cake
L Ron Hubbard Affirmations
you are interested only in your own sexual pleasure.
They are unimportant in bed except as they thrill you.Your sexual power is magnificent and they know it. If they are afraid of it, that is their loss.
There is nothing wrong in the sex act. Nothing any woman may say can change your opinion.
you had the whole right to use or help or hurt people

lotus, Jun 14, 2015
lotusautonomous rebellous
I told you I was trouble said: ↑
I cannot imagine scientologists (no matter how sucked in to the cult they were) keeping it quiet though ... and certainly not after all these years.
I just cannot imagine that all of his "tek people" would remain quiet and effectively protect him.
This is why
Swift : Can you list the crimes or immoral acts you've been involved in, or witnessed, as a Sea Org member?
Aaron: 
Some of the crimes involved other Sea Org members. The most notable crimes were the releasing of private information to the public on people we wanted blacklisted. Rapes of underage Sea Org Children were covered up. There were instances where Scientologists, as part of checking their qualifications, revealed true crimes against other civilians, such as theft, child molestation and even murder. At a price, such crimes were never divulged to the police unless the person went against Scientology. I think my most reprehensible act was requesting abortions and punishing young Sea Org members between the ages of 13 and 17 for petty crimes, making them feel very guilty and issuing severe punishments that should not be given to a human being.
Also the late Alexander's rape - son of Karen delac - she told the whole story here.
12 years old, rape by a female scientologists - he had been muzzled and handled into a cover up. 
Karen didn't knew. 
I can't find anything with Google from Andre Tabayoyon or anyone else though to bring about some reliable info on this 

:confused2:
lotus, Jun 14, 2015

http://www.forum.exscn.net/threads/hubbard-as-a-pedophile.39730/page-2

lotusautonomous rebellous
oneonewasaracecar said: ↑
2) The idea that Mary Sue considered their marriage over. She went to prison for him. She was still loyal. This story does not ring true.
What I understood with reading on the subject is that
She was thrown under the bus...she was handled and has no choice - a strategy organized by the pope and executed by Rathbun and Associates,
(reliable testimonies by parties involved with rathbun can be found)
:confused2:
lotus, Jun 14, 2015
lotusautonomous rebellous
Just posted on another thread by Karen and corroborating sexual abuses on the apollo
Incest here
and covered-up
Karen#1 said: ↑
Norman Starkey, Executor of L Ron Hubbard will.
Unstable drunk.
A less liked more obnoxious Sea Org member.
Mike Reppen posted today that Normal Starkey had sexually assaulted his 17 year
old sister on the Apollo. All covered up nicely.
The coerced cover-up and fair game threats, may explain the absence of any testimony, in the event, child molestation by LRH had happened.
lotus, Jun 14, 2015

LelandCrusader
I've mentioned this before. While in LA....around 1986 or so......one day, Steve Miller, the NoN-SO cramming officer ( in the Qual Division) at AOLA.....told me that some guy had molested his daughter. This was something that happened...and was real....and was known about at AOLA...and the grapevine around the ORG...was all about it.
I do not know if the guy was SO or Public.....I think he was Public.
I don't know what happened.....
The next day....things went on as "normal."
Last edited: Jun 14, 2015
Leland, Jun 14 2015

WildKatGold Meritorious Patro
Free Being Me said: ↑
I'm with you on that score. Elcon abused and terrorized his kids and the kids of his $cientologists but I've never heard of anything beyond that leading to pedophilia. As much as I absolutely thoroughly enjoy exposing Elcon for the lying vermin he was, I've never seen any dox on this subject.
IF it happened, the only "DOX" might be session write-ups of auditing sessions of the creep himself or the daughter (Diana?). The only other verification might be from any auditors/CSes that were involved. But as we all know any True Believer would be sure to destroy anything that makes the Hub look bad. Or take the secret to their grave. "Greatest good" and all.
I wouldn't put it past some techie person or CS to make a program for the victim to make sure they located any lifetimes where THEY were the abuser. Cuz everyone knows no one is really a victim unless they have "similar overts" of their own.
I bet a lot of actionable offenses have been swept under the carpet using such "logic".
WildKat, Jun 14, 2015

Free Being Me said: ↑
I'm with you on that score. Elcon abused and terrorized his kids and the kids of his $cientologists but I've never heard of anything beyond that leading to pedophilia. As much as I absolutely thoroughly enjoy exposing Elcon for the lying vermin he was, I've never seen any dox on this subject.

IF it happened, the only "DOX" might be session write-ups of auditing sessions of the creep himself or the daughter (Diana?). The only other verification might be from any auditors/CSes that were involved. But as we all know any True Believer would be sure to destroy anything that makes the Hub look bad. Or take the secret to their grave. "Greatest good" and all.
I wouldn't put it past some techie person or CS to make a program for the victim to make sure they located any lifetimes where THEY were the abuser. Cuz everyone knows no one is really a victim unless they have "similar overts" of their own.
I bet a lot of actionable offenses have been swept under the carpet using such "logic".
WildKat, Jun 14, 2015

SPsince83Gold Meritorious Patron

WildKat said: ↑
IF it happened, the only "DOX" might be session write-ups of auditing sessions of the creep himself or the daughter (Diana?). The only other verification might be from any auditors/CSes that were involved. But as we all know any True Believer would be sure to destroy anything that makes the Hub look bad. Or take the secret to their grave. "Greatest good" and all.
I wouldn't put it past some techie person or CS to make a program for the victim to make sure they located any lifetimes where THEY were the abuser. Cuz everyone knows no one is really a victim unless they have "similar overts" of their own.
I bet a lot of actionable offenses have been swept under the carpet using such "logic".
That "you pulled it in" shit covered tracks for a lot of assholes.
Last edited: Jun 14, 2015

SPsince83, Jun 14, 2015

Free Being MeCrusader
WildKat said: ↑
IF it happened, the only "DOX" might be session write-ups of auditing sessions of the creep himself or the daughter (Diana?). The only other verification might be from any auditors/CSes that were involved. But as we all know any True Believer would be sure to destroy anything that makes the Hub look bad. Or take the secret to their grave. "Greatest good" and all.
I wouldn't put it past some techie person or CS to make a program for the victim to make sure they located any lifetimes where THEY were the abuser. Cuz everyone knows no one is really a victim unless they have "similar overts" of their own.
I bet a lot of actionable offenses have been swept under the carpet using such "logic".
That's entirely possible given how $cientologists think.
Free Being Me, Jun 14, 2015

Panda TermintCabal Of One
WildKat said: ↑
IF it happened, the only "DOX" might be session write-ups of auditing sessions of the creep himself or the daughter (Diana?). The only other verification might be from any auditors/CSes that were involved. But as we all know any True Believer would be sure to destroy anything that makes the Hub look bad....
Right but I doubt that this would have remained a secret for long. Scientologists, in the main, abhor this particular crime (just as any right-thinking person does). If there was anything to it, I'm pretty sure we would have heard/read about it by now. 
Pedophilia is seldom a one-off occurrence, we've seen/read plenty of first hand witnesses to the real Hubbard speaking out. This would have been all over the net by now if it had any substance. 
Just my opinion, I could be wrong.
Panda Termint, Jun 14, 2015
anonomogGold Meritorious Patron

Panda Termint said: ↑
Right but I doubt that this would have remained a secret for long. Scientologists, in the main, abhor this particular crime (just as any right-thinking person does). If there was anything to it, I'm pretty sure we would have heard/read about it by now. 
Pedophilia is seldom a one-off occurrence, we've seen/read plenty of first hand witnesses to the real Hubbard speaking out. This would have been all over the net by now if it had any substance. 
Just my opinion, I could be wrong.
I agree with you. A paedophile would rarely strike once.But a man who simply loved the power of psychologically torturing and manipulating people would. 
I don't think that Hubbard was a paedophile in the strict sense of the word. Enough time has gone by that the net would be full of first and second hand statements. Repeated sexual abuse would not stay hidden.

I do think he wouldn't let any opportunity, for him, go by, whatever that opportunity was. It is not a long-shot to think that he did have sex with underage children, or at the very least tried. Not because he couldn't help himself but because he could do it and get away with it.

What a damning testament to the man.
anonomog, Jun 14, 2015

EnthetanMaster of Disaster

Rmack said: ↑
Just a quick question that will boggle your mind. 'Hopefully'.
Considering all we know about Laffy's misdeeds, did you ever wonder about the ones we don't know about?
I can guarantee you that he was smart enough to hide things from us.
One thing about Hubbard: he lived the latter part of his life in hiding and in fear of being arrested. It makes me wonder just how many things he was afraid would come out if he was in a position where he could no longer do bad things to people who displeased him.

Enthetan, Jun 14, 2015
LelandCrusader
Leland said: ↑
=I've mentioned this before. While in LA....around 1986 or so......one day, Steve Miller, the NoN-SO cramming officer ( in the Qual Division) at AOLA.....told me that some guy had molested his daughter. This was something that happened...and was real....and was known about at AOLA...and the grapevine around the ORG...was all about it.
I do not know if the guy was SO or Public.....I think he was Public.
I don't know what happened.....
The next day....things went on as "normal."
I'm posting this again....as an example of an ENTIRE org of SO Staff.....closing ranks...and sweeping a child molestation incident under the carpet..…
Leland, Jun 14, 2015

West GrinstedPatron
DeeAnna said: ↑
At the 20:39 marker as mentioned in the OP, it is being said that an affidavit by "Andre Trevoygan"???? alleged that Hubbard raped a 12 year old boy in Morocco. And then goes on to say there were rumors LRH was having sex with one of his own children. 
Anybody here know the correct name for the person making the Morocco allegation?
Maybe you are talking of Andre Tabayoyon, who served in Viet Nam and made a very well known affidavit. There could be stories of sexual abuse while old Hub was doing black magic with Parsons in Pasadena? or in the early days of Dianetics ?
Tabayoyon, Andre. 1994. 'Declaration of Andre Tabayoyon.' In Church of Scientology International v. Steven Fishman and Uwe Geertz. United States District Court, Central District of California. Case No. CV 91 6426 HLH (Tx), (4 April): 64 pp. 
I never heard anything on abusing children sexually. There are a few Commodore Messengers still around who were young girls at the time like the Ghilam sisters, Sharon Stainforth, they reported the abusive use of "ethics" on the Apollo but nothing on the sexual side. 
West Grinsted, Jun 15, 2015

OgsonofgrooCrusader
Rmack said: ↑
The only thing I've ever come across is LRH Jr. (Ron DeWolf) claiming he would take anything to bed; little boys, old ladies.
I know some people don't believe anything 'Nibs' said, but I wouldn't be surprised.
Thanks Rmack, yup, stories I've read over the years on Hubbard's proclivities have run a pretty grim spectrum. From old accounts of stranglings, coat-hanger abortions, getting his rocks off by beating women into submission, problems with his balls hanging too low from masturbating, trying to cure himself from the dose, hey, he was a very kinky, drug-addled, sadistic fuck. Yes, I know its not a popular subject for many, well buried by cult, ignored by some, but holy-fucking-hell, he was a mess, unfortunately a mess with the gift-of-gab and the brain of a master criminal.
That the sorry old fart-bag was a first rate conniver/liar, hardly stands up to the over-all scam he came up with, the unbelievable amount of human wreckage his scam has left behind is far more relevant than any sort of 'of good' thing he gave the world. He gave the world nothing really, and damaged so, so many.

Gah, snipping rant nao 
My semi-educated opinion and sticking to it.
Ogs
Ogsonofgroo, Jun 15, 2015
VictoriaPatron Meritorious
As horrid as pedophillia is, I hold Hubbards long term abuse in every other area of people's lives to warrant just as much despise.
IF he never sexually molested a child, it was simply because he had no desire to do so.
Not out of any sense of right or wrong.
Victoria, Jun 15, 2015
RmackVan Allen Belt Sunbather
TheOriginalBigBlueGold Meritorious Patron

FreeThePeople44 said: ↑

I have een searching around for more information on what I heard in a YouTube video with Jon Atack and Steve Hassan. Jon talks about Hubbard raping children but I can find nothing on the net about this. Can anyone point me in the right direction?
Here is the video below. Jon talks about Hubbards pedophilia at 20:39. Truly disturbing.


https://youtu.be/VM_kWQAR0iY?t=20m39s

Jon makes a profound observation at 49:00 to the effect that society contributes to making people vulnerable to Scientology indoctrination because of the authoritarian educational system and other manipulations like workplace team building and language usage
TheOriginalBigBlue, Jun 15, 2015

FreeThePeople44Patron
I have listened to the jeff augustine podcasts and heard about the other disgusting kid rape stories from the sea org. It seems that perverts just can't help but hide behind religion to gain access to innocents youngsters. 
Psychopaths like LRH and captain dave get off on hurting people. I know miscavige takes much pleasure in abusing staff. Makes met wonder what kind of sick shit he is doing in the bedroom. I picture him as a shorter version of King Geoffrey from Game of Thrones
FreeThePeople44, Jun 17, 2015
Northern ShewolfPatron Meritorious

prosecco said: ↑
It depends on your definition of paedophile. Yes, he had young children as his servants denying them education, a family life, slave labour, mental and emotional abuse.
But, don't think there is any evidence that he sexually assaulted or sexually abused any children personally.
I personaly think that shoving a small boy (5 years old, wasn't it?) in a dank locked space in the ship's hold is total abuse and demonstrates a level of perversity that makes it easy to believe Hubby-tubby indulged all of his cravings....After all he espoused a fierce anti-homosexuality stance, and it is not difficult to belive he had his own child, the presumptive heir to the whole shebang murdered....Speculationon my part, but as John Atack has stated that Hubshit violated one of his sons without naming whom it was, he was showing the victims basic respect and discretion.
Power corrupts and the longer it is held, the more absolute its demands.
EnthetanMaster of Disaster

Rmack said: ↑
There was apparently some incidents at Big Blue when I was there around '80 of reverse child molesting going on.
My wife told me that some S.O. guy was confronted in an elevator or something with a teenage girl who was eyeing his crotch and being suggestive somehow.
This guy flipped, and had her investigated, and supposedly uncovered a ring of these girls that were giving blow-jobs and what not in parking structure stairwells and such to Sea Org members. They were S.O. members kids with way too much time on their hands, apparently.
Damn, I missed out on all the good shit!
Around the mid 80's, I was standing around and overhearing one girl (seemed about 13) telling her friend about getting $5 for having a guy "see her cup-cakes". I think she meant for me to overhear, looking for buyers.
Considering the poverty that SO and staff kids endured, it's not surprising to me that some would figure out ways to get extra cash.
Adding: one time when I was at Flag on service in the early 90's, sitting by myself in a waiting room, a SO girl approached me and just said "I'm 18". Just that, and waited for my response. I was at a loss for a reply, so she turned and left. The impression I got was that she was looking for an upstat guy to take her home and get her out of there.
Enthetan, Jun 17, 2015
SPsince83Gold Meritorious Patron

Enthetan said: ↑
Around the mid 80's, I was standing around and overhearing one girl (seemed about 13) telling her friend about getting $5 for having a guy "see her cup-cakes". I think she meant for me to overhear, looking for buyers.
Considering the poverty that SO and staff kids endured, it's not surprising to me that some would figure out ways to get extra cash.
A young daughter of a Delphi staff member left when her father went to AOLA and was gone for 2 or 3 years. Nice kid, pretty face, a bit pudgy. They came back to visit and OMG what a BABE she had grown into. She started telling me about life in LA and how she had had several offers to do porn. She considered it flattering. The girl was only 14 or 15.
SPsince83, Jun 17, 2015

GizmoRabble Rouser
gsonofgroo said: ↑
Thanks Rmack, yup, stories I've read over the years on Hubbard's proclivities have run a pretty grim spectrum. From old accounts of stranglings, coat-hanger abortions, getting his rocks off by beating women into submission, problems with his balls hanging too low from masturbating, trying to cure himself from the dose, hey, he was a very kinky, drug-addled, sadistic fuck. Yes, I know its not a popular subject for many, well buried by cult, ignored by some, but holy-fucking-hell, he was a mess, unfortunately a mess with the gift-of-gab and the brain of a master criminal.
That the sorry old fart-bag was a first rate conniver/liar, hardly stands up to the over-all scam he came up with, the unbelievable amount of human wreckage his scam has left behind is far more relevant than any sort of 'of good' thing he gave the world. He gave the world nothing really, and damaged so, so many.

Gah, snipping rant nao 
My semi-educated opinion and sticking to it.

Ogs
Yet, even as the cute nubile little girls paraded around him in boots, hot pants & halter tops serving his every whim we still have those are saying " Well, he never DID anything ".
Take any other older man, put those children around him & watch how fast his old ass gets in trouble with the law.
Gizmo, Jun 17, 2015

http://www.forum.exscn.net/threads/hubbard-as-a-pedophile.39730/page-3

http://www.forum.exscn.net/threads/hubbard-as-a-pedophile.39730/page-4

http://www.forum.exscn.net/threads/hubbard-as-a-pedophile.39730/page-5


OgsonofgrooCrusader

Thanks for the bump thar Gizmo. 
Hubbard and his proclivities is kind of interesting, I think he'd have fucked just about anything if he thought it would gain him any sort of power, and I've no doubt that 'power' played into his scheme of things all the time. The power over people, in his case, his sexual deviant nature and attitudes, is confetti when one tries to put all the pieces together, and I think takes a bit of reading-between-the-lines, and some extrapolation/conjecture. One of the many 'Hells-on-Earth' people have suffered through over the ages imho.
On the subject of his possible pedophilia, my thought is this~ if the twisted fucker could have gotten away with it I've little doubt he would have taken every advantage. The consideration I'd like to bring up is this, (and please excuse me if I don't phrase my thoughts coherently), and it is multi-fold, is that he had a sadistic streak, and by the few old accounts, he was, by some accounts, a strangler, a sadist and abuser, a power freak who needed to be the dominator. 
Given that during his hay-days before he went into hiding he was pretty high profile, it would not have been good form to lay his sick abuses on children of his followers, no matter how 'starry-eyed' his flock was, it was not the sort of publicity/rep he would want exposed.
The whole bullshite 'theory' of children being 'Big Thetans in little bodies', is the kind of demented justification that many pedos drool over, and I think that some of the 'basic' premises LCon forwarded may explain the totally dysfunctional nature of the cult when it comes to sexuality issues. The abuse has gone on for years, has affected and destroyed so many.... Not all the apples have been rotten, but there is no doubt in my mind, that the barrel certainly was/is.
Just. Plain. Fucked up.

GAH!   
Bottom line is, L. Ron Hubbard was a mentally ill, sick, and twisted con-artist, a natural liar and sleeze-bag of the highest order. That so many have been, and are, sucked into his messy confabulation, is testament to the often trusting nature of humans trying to gain insight into this wondrous universe, and ultimately the depths of depravity that can be reached when a person gains power over others for their own gain. Everyone becomes a 'victim' on some level.
*sigh* I feel like I could rant for a while, and have done so before, but this just bums me out and I don't need it at this time. I go now.
 to those who have survived this incredibly convoluted mess and escaped with their souls and sanity.
Ogs

I haz ta stop this rant now, just so frikken maddening to me

1982 CW Scientology Hearings - Edward Walter 1/2 - Day 1
https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=AzjRgj5CnAE

Mark Bunker
Published on May 3, 2012
As the first witness, Walters covers a lot of ground, giving an overview of the corruption that the city council will hear about for several days. Playlist of Full Hearings: http://www.youtube.com/playlist?list=...

1982 CW Scientology Hearings - Casey Kelly - Day 2
https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=epIbQJPE8m4

Mark Bunker
Published on May 3, 2012
During the years Kelly spent in Scientology, he handled their finances and recruitment. This is the first part of his testimony. He returned to finish the following morning. Playlist of Full Hearings: http://www.youtube.com/playlist?list=...

1982 CW Scientology Hearings - Ernest and Adelle Hartwell - Day 3
https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=52A0kSTe0Kw

1982 CW Scientology Hearings - Lavenda Van Schaick - Day 4
https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=Ug3MJoE-kkQ

Mark Bunker
Published on May 3, 2012
Lavenda Van Schaick testifies about the living conditions of children and contends that hepatitis swept through the Clearwater base in 1977. Playlist of Full Hearings: http://www.youtube.com/playlist?list=...

1982 CW Scientology Hearings - Scientology's Response - Day 5
https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=ELiShbV8k4A

Mark Bunker
Published on May 3, 2012
Attorney Paul Johnson appears for the church. One week earlier, he had demanded to be allowed to speak. Once he had his chance, he refused to respond to any of the charges leveled in the hearings. Playlist of Full Hearings: http://www.youtube.com/playlist?list=...

Paulette Cooper, the author in 1967. Little did she realize the turn her life was about to take.

Ron Hubbard's grandfather was supposed to have owned a quarter of the state of Montana. Here he is seen as he really was, a struggling veterinarian, pictured with his wife and their first child (Ron's mother) at Tilden, Nebraska, around the late 1880s. and Abram Waterbury, L. Ron Hubbard's great-grandfather, playing the fiddle carved with a negro's head that became part of the family legend, and The hospital in Tilden, Nebraska, where L. Ron Hubbard was born in 1911. His aunt Toilie, who worked in the hospital, is second from the right.

"I was named a likely suspect and the next thing I knew I was called to appear before a federal grand jury in New York.". Paulette Cooper,, the author of The Scandal of Scientology (1971) - A chilling examination of the nature, beliefs and practices of the “now religion”

Masters of Sleep, one of Hubbard's last works of pulp fiction, on the cover of the October 1950 issue of Fantastic Adventures

L. Ron_Hubbard_was_An_MI6_Agent 
Spencer Fayette Eddy
​​Scientology Roots Chapter Nine – L. Ron Hubbard’s Lifelong Intelligence Career
http://www.awn.bz/Ron_Hubbard_GroomedByMI6.html​

The British nobility has been working on a Grand Plan to make themselves the ruthless ruler of the entire world.
The rest of humanity does not agree to their idea that the British nobility should rule the world. They do not want to be obedient subjects, servants and slaves who live under the boot and say-so of the British aristocracy. Most men want to live as free men who live under their own will and say-so.
Thus the British slavemasters conducted mental and spiritual research. Their real interest in studying the human mind and spirit was to learn how to control men, so they could modify his behavior into what they want all men to be – willing subjects under rule by the British nobility.
​The Cecil family is one of the top British slavemaster families. Their family has been the head of British intelligence for over 400 years. Robert Cecil was the leader of an influential family called the Cecil Bloc. He was the head of British intelligence and he was a British Prime Minister.                                                             
Robert Arthur Talbot Gascoyne-Cecil (Lord Salisbury)
One of his sisters had a son named Arthur Balfour. He was in the Cecil family and he was also a head of British intelligence and a Prime Minister of Britain.  
Arthur J. Balfou
Where Is Shelly Miscavige? New Details About Scientology Leader David Miscavige's Wife Who Hasn't Been Seen Publicly In Years
https://www.yourtango.com/2019321597/where-shelly-miscavige-new-details-missing-scientology-leader-wife
Entertainment And News February 12, 2019, Contributor Sarah Gangraw
Leah Remini EXPOSES Scientology  https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=R6oYaMtJln0   2,229,021 views Ken Ammi Published on Nov 1, 2015
Read More on this page 

L. RON HUBBARD ESSAY
SOCIETY-  JUSTICE
https://www.freedommag.org/magazine/201702-the-data-demon/l-ron-hubbard-essay/justice.html
In the mid- to late-twentieth century, Scientology Founder L. Ron Hubbard authored an extraordinary series of essays

on tyranny of government, injustice, oppressive economics and psychiatric abuse. He wrote the bulk of these works for Freedommagazine

. The following essay is among the many originally published in 1969.
The major breakdown of Western democracy is its habit of carelessly basing legal actions on false reports.
Anyone can say anything about anybody, and police powers and courts are liable to act on reports so false that a child could see through the lie.
This was the most odious thing about the nazis. And this characterizes Communist “justice.”
In February 1969, I isolated the false accusation, false report and failing to confront the accused with his accusers as the basic breakdown of justice.

These undermine personal security and involve the whole judiciary in endless, needless traffic.
Innocent people are subjected to press attacks, court procedures, endless expense and ruined lives by these factors alone.
Corrupt pressure groups, such as the psychiatrists, can disrupt any possible rival or tear the social structure of a nation to pieces

as long as false reports are published, accepted and acted upon.

So flagrant is this abuse that it destroys, for one and all, the value of the cause of democracy.
When justice becomes slow, when it becomes expensive and when false reports on people and groups are allowed to

go unchallenged and unpunished, any ideology becomes a tyranny.
So great are these factors in the disruption of loyalty and creation of revolutionaries that no government that permits them is safe.
This is, in fact, a new philosophic breakthrough in the field of jurisprudence. The great importance of the false report in breaking down a nation’s social structure and its cause has not been understood.

Most of the internal conflict in a country is caused by individuals and groups defending themselves against false reports.
In a period where governments “seek to capture the minds of men,” a great deal of reform will have to be done.

Human rights have as one of their threats the false report. Yet there is no adequate practical recourse. Suits for libel? Forget them. They cost more than anyone can afford, take forever to try and leave the public with the false reports even when they are won.

As false reports tear down the security of the individual and small group, these then have to assert themselves. They do so, in their turn, by attacking.

A nation which permits these to be acted upon will eventually find itself deserted by its populace and supporting groups, attacked by its decent people and eventually will be overthrown.

To save itself, a nation must permit direct legal action which is fast and inexpensive so that an individual or group can legally protect itself from false reports.

Only if the “free” world reforms its human rights will it have a cause worth fighting for, worth supporting. Otherwise its public and social groups will desert it to any other cause without even much examining it.

The virtues of patriotism, loyalty and devotion to the government are not dead by some strange social decay. They are dead because people feel their government no longer protects them, even attacks them, opens the door on them to easy psychiatric seizure, fantastic taxation and personal insecurity.

For instance, the black man in the US has long been saying he will not fight for the government.

That isn’t because he’s a Communist. It’s because anyone can lay a charge on them, no matter how false, get a black man jailed, beaten up, lynched.

And authorities shrugged with “It’s just a coon.” He had no equal respect under law. Any false report, untested, could get him arrested, beaten or killed.

So he became very insecure. And now he continually riots, loots, burns, is even closing universities. All because any false report was accepted.

And he could be beaten or hung waiting on slow, expensive justice.

It isn’t limited to US blacks. This was true of all US minority groups and is true of religious and racial minority groups in far too many countries.

So they form a core of resistance and unrest. They are nervous and defensive.

Then, as the situation worsens, many social groups begin to react to false reports against them, again unable to obtain justice fast enough

to prevent name damage.
About that time the officials better look to their foreign bank accounts and decamp. For that government, even while still functioning,

is no longer the government of its people. It is their enemy. Any revolutionary movement will be joined.

These are the mechanics of revolution.
People will stand for an awful lot. Then one day patriotism is dead. Because the government no longer has a cause the majority believe

in or will fight for.
The principles of not accepting false reports and confronting one with his accusers and their accusations before punishing actions of any kind are so strong that if the West accepted them and scrupulously practiced them, it would have a cause great enough to survive.

It could then “out-cause” the Communist.
As it stands, Western governments have to buy and bribe their defense at a cost so fantastic it will break them.
Our position is this: We are standing up and befriending Western powers, trying to get them to pull up their honor and justice before the mob gets to them and tears them to bits.
https://www.freedommag.org/magazine/201702-the-data-demon/l-ron-hubbard-essay/justice.html

Meet Mat Pesch Scientology Sea Org Veteran ~ Part One
https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=Wt-gxC-ISto

SurvivingScientology, Published on Jul 21, 2014
Mat Pesch was a Sea Org member for almost thirty years. After routing out ijn 2005, Mat and his wife Amy Scobee went "under the radar" and wrote the now famous "Little Dickie Bedtime Stories." Link: http://www.forum.exscn.net/showthread... These stories helped to expose David Miscavige and the greed and violence inside the Church of Scientology. Mat Pesch was the Treasury Secretary of the Flag Service Organization (FSO) in Clearwater, Florida. In this interview with Jeffrey Augustine, Mat recounts his experiences as Treasury Secretary in the 1990's. Mat corroborates the fact that Alexander Jentzsch was sexually molested at twelve years of age at Flag Land Base by Marie Warren, a 40 year old Sea Org member. After the sexual molestation was discovered by Church officials, the police were not called. Instead, Mat was ordered to find money for the airline tickets needed to fly Alexander and the Sea Org rapist out of the jurisdiction of local and state law enforcement. Mat offers his opinion that the Ideal Orgs were an "unusual solution" to Flag's enormous Advanced Payments liability. Radio Podcasts http://www.survivingscientologyradio.... Follow me on Facebook - https://www.facebook.com/karendelac Follow me on Twitter - https://www.twitter.com/KarendlaCariere

Mat Pesch ex Scientologist states knew knows of children and adult females being raped, at the Scientology bases, and are never reported to the police. All that would happen is that the people involved would be flown out of the area by Scientology … Mat Pesch was the secretary who had to organize the funds to pay for  airfares to the people involved in the rape of children and adults out of the area …
The make girls to get abortions and deliberately drive the pregnant girls to different area to obtain their abortions…
$1.7 million per week from the main Flag Organization All up $2.2 to $2.5 million income of tax free money… What happens to the money
Some expenses have to be paid And the rest of the money goes upline.. ... Church of Scientology International ….
All the money goes into an executive for Church of Scientology International …. Who decide what will be given back to the local Org base.
The amount of money given back to the local organization at the finance meetings does not increase each month, even if the local base brings in more income …
$100,000 of free auditing for Tom Cruise and his family ..
Mat Pesch  reported Tom and his Family for getting free ordering … to David McTavich…
So he ends of getting sent to work in the mill to make furniture……. from a senior executive..
In the late 1980’s was about 800 850 staff at Flag and it is still the same number to day
Now 1,200 to 1,300 people 
They are paid very little money in wages…
They can not afford their room and board so they work extra hours to pay for their room and board…. like cleaning hotel rooms, washing dishes etc 
There is $1.5 billion plus dollars in assets …

L Ron Hubbard-In The USA in 1969- Freedom Magazine writing his Essay on Justice 

Cooper says her life is back on track, and that she is enjoying some well-earned time away from the pandora's box she opened nearly forty years ago.

L. Ron Hubbard Interview: Introduction To Scientology [1966]
https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=tXI4CBvtS2E

L33T GUY, Published on Jul 22, 2017
What is Scientology? I'm not a proponent of L. Ron Hubbard or the CoS, but there is no denying he was an interesting character and had studied the occult and esoteric ideas. This is one of the only interviews he gave and was distributed by the Church of Scientology in the late 60s. He ponders the nature of man and an introduction to his new religion, Scientology. SOURCE: - Video is copyright the Church of Scientology. #Scientology #Hubbard ----- - SUBSCRIBE: https://www.youtube.com/c/L33TGUY WEB: https://anons.ca TWITTER: https://www.twitter.com/l33tguy 

"I just spent about $180,000 to get to the state of Clear, and it makes this pastry at the Fort Harrison Hotel so worth it.." .. Sonia who is now Clear

L Ron Hubbard with children _ claims. questions and allegations have been made by ex-scientology members of the strange and unusual way

L Ron Hubbard and other members of Scientology have treated children that are have been effectively forced to be made members of

Scientology at a young age ., some of them now tell most dramatic stories of the difficulties of escaping from Scientology in later life .... 

Hubbard conducting a Dianetics seminar in Los Angeles, 1950

MISS LOVELY
Scientology’s First ‘Victim’
L. Ron Hubbard called her a bitch, the FBI found files on her in its raids: The story of Scientology’s most famous critic.

M.L. Nestel
 07.12.17 

https://www.thedailybeast.com/scientologys-first-victim

Those were the choice words belted out by Scientology founder L. Ron Hubbard back in 1974 as he pounded on his desk while playing Commodore aboard his yacht, the Apollo.
Cooper, one of the earliest writers to look into the Church of Scientology’s inner workings, has long maintained that Hubbard (or LRH, as he’s often referred to) had it out for her. Just tally up the 19 lawsuits slapped against Cooper by the Church, the 40 lawyers she retained, and the 50 days of depositions—including one reportedly involving a Scientology lawyer who pressed Cooper for a stool sample. (Cooper quipped back: “If you want one, you’ll get it—on your head.”)
This story of Hubbard’s maritime rage is an incredible nugget in the middle of Tony Ortega’s new book, The Unbreakable Miss Lovely, which lands on bookstands this week. Ortega managed to unearth the anecdote after poring over a deposition of Tonja Burden, who was only 15 at the time. Burden was one of Hubbard’s "Messengers,” young females tasked with lighting his cigarettes, prepping his showers, and laundering his shirts “13 times to get any smell out of them.” LRH apparently had a nasty aversion to flowery scents, especially “rose perfume,” the book reveals.
The book’s title plays off Cooper’s supposed code name within Scientology, “Miss Lovely,” which she gained “because she was so beautiful,” Ortega told me. Other citizens have reported being harassed and bullied by Scientology, but nothing to the extent of Paulette Cooper’s story. She’s the first one many people think of when it comes to Scientology’s alleged victims.
The book is a wallop of a read and Cooper is presented as sympathetic, tragic, and, for a brief bit, unreliable, as she allegedly plots against the Church in her own way. But Ortega also makes some incredible claims that seem to rely upon deep reportage, tracking down people Ortega identifies as long-lost Scientologists and weaving their testimonials into a gripping narrative.
A Church of Scientology spokeswoman, in a statement, emphatically denounced the book and called Ortega “a parasite” for using “bigotry and false allegations about the Church of Scientology to create a cottage industry of hate.”
The statement went on to suggest that out of the many claims in the book, none of them dignify a thorough response.
“Despite Tony Ortega’s desperate need for publicity, we see no reason to revisit the subject or respond to debunked falsehoods concerning events three to four decades old involving individuals who have long since been expelled,” the statement read.
The Church added that it settled all claims with Cooper in 1985.
“It is a matter of public record that the current Church management disbanded the rogue unit with which she was having trouble long before then. The Church has neither heard from nor been involved in anything related to Ms. Cooper for 30 years,” according to a Church spokeswoman.
Out of all the writers who have gone head to head with Scientology, Cooper’s story is perhaps the most incredible. She was dashing and easily made hearts skip a few beats during her early years in Manhattan, where she lived and plied her craft as an independent journalist.
Cooper says she remembers how Scientology came knocking at her front door on June 6, 1968. It was the day after Robert F. Kennedy had been assassinated and Cooper was a twenty-something advertising copywriter trying to cut her teeth as a magazine stringer in New York City.
The Brandeis psych grad, who spent some time at Harvard studying mental health patients, says she received a former boss at her Manhattan apartment.

Cooper recounts in herown book how the man began singing Scientology’s praises and how he’d been doling out wads of charity cash to random homeless people. Then, Cooper says, he told her he was God, the lord and savior, and that "God has decided to rape you.”

Cooper managed to fend him off.
But her journalist instincts kicked in and she enrolled in classes at the Scientology Org in Midtown Manhattan under a pseudonym. She says she only lasted a few days before higher-ups in the organization's Ethics department were onto her. But Cooper says she remembers engaging in staring contests where she hallucinated—and says she was subjected to “bullbaiting,” wherein Scientologists allegedly chastised her for no reason and made propositions like, “You know what I’m going to do to you," supposedly to see if she would break.
Cooper ultimately began cobbling together her intel on this new religion and turned it into a feature story for the magazine Queen.
Before long, Cooper was living every day in fear, as she claims she was fielding death threats. She was convinced she was being followed and that her phone line was tapped.
In 1977, when the FBI raided the Los Angeles and D.C. offices of the Church, they found scores of documents that they used to send several high-ranking Scientologists to the slammer.
These same documents, Ortega's book says, also indicated that the Church had been monitoring Cooper’s movements since 1971 and ordered some members to lift pages from her diary, according to Ortega’s book. The group seemed particularly interested in the pages that catalogued teenage angst aimed toward her parents, the book says, or the ones that included sexually-charged thoughts.
Ortega’s book says that, in an attempt to frame Cooper, Church members typed up two anonymous bomb threats and sent them to the Church of Scientology headquarters in New York with Cooper’s fingerprints on them. Cooper maintains the Church got her fingerprints by getting a stranger to goad her into signing a petition to help the activist Cesar Chavez.
Soon, Cooper was hauled in front of a grand jury in Manhattan to answer for the terroristic threats and almost faced a trial until her attorneys used Cooper’s passing of a Q&A test, while on sodium pentothal, to get the charges chucked.
In the course of his research, Ortega says he managed to track down FBI Special Agent Christine Hansen. She was one of the few women at the bureau in the 1970s. This is apparently the first time anybody has managed to interview the former special agent. Because of her tenacity and eagle eye, on June 11, 1976, Hansen says she caught a Scientology member named Gerald Bennett Wolfe in the act of cribbing files from the IRS, the Department of Justice, and a dozen other government offices. He ended up serving five years in prison. His colleague Michael Meisner ultimately flipped for the Feds.
The reported effort to steal the files from government agencies and law firms was known as the “Snow White Program,” Hansen told Ortega.
Ortega also dives into “Operation Freakout,” the Church’s apparent attempt to target Cooper and frame her as insane, to get her committed.
Ortega’s book claims that a Scientology spy approached Cooper at a popular NYC watering hole and asked her to read a bad joke off of a piece of paper. Her fingerprints on the joke stationary were used, Ortega says, in threatening letters sent to then-Secretary of State Henry Kissinger. The Church allegedly enlisted a woman who sounded like Cooper and would be tasked with calling Kissinger’s office to make phone threats, as well as another woman cast to dress like Cooper and to play her doppleganger.
According to Ortega’s account of the documents seized in the FBI raid, Scientologists had instructed, “Several different outfits should have been obtained by [Paulette’s double] so that when the caper goes down, she can immediately change into the color or type of outfit that Paulette has on.” Then, the book says, calls would be made to Arab embassies with the Cooper lookalike claiming: “I’m going to bomb you bastards!”
After the raids, Ortega says, "Operation Freakout" was never fully completed.
Still, even after Cooper appeared on 60 Minutes to talk about Scientology, Ortega’s book suggests that several plots continued to target “Miss Lovely.” In one of them, a supposed friend called Jerry Levin, who had come into Cooper’s life suddenly and mysteriously, allegedly told Cooper to jump from a 33-story ledge above a rooftop swimming pool.
“Why on earth would Jerry want me to climb that ledge,” Cooper told The Daily Beast. “He was up there, it would have taken the slightest push and that would have been in it.”
According to Cooper, Levin was a secret Scientologist who had befriended her and lived with her during some of the lowest months of her life.
Not long after Levin moved out, and as Cooper was awaiting trial for making bomb threats (which she says were actually made by her Scientology impersonators), she says the only thing that saved her from a suicide-by-Valium attempt was a friend’s phone call wishing her a happy birthday.

By 1980, Cooper had decided to fight back against the Church. That was the year, the book says, that she met a private investigator named Richard Bast. (He passed away in 2001.) Cooper says Bast told her he was working for a rich Swissman who had lost his daughter to suicide. The girl had been a Scientologist and after her death, Bast said, the man had hired him to build a case against the Church.
The book says the two began to cook up ways to undermine the Church. Cooper would find every news clipping related to Scientology and bring them to Bast. But soon, the book says, Cooper started to hatch some of her own schemes to fool the Scientologists.
Ortega lays out how Bast suggested Cooper sleep with people in order to get intel and even allegedly suggested that a friend should plant drugs in the Church’s D.C. office, so that Cooper could then tip off the cops. “The point I want to make is, if we have any kind of police raid, this gay friend of mine.... probably [could] get us some. A couple of things you might want to consider—leaving them there that might make much bigger headlines. Like cocaine,” she told Bast, unaware that he was taping her statements, according to court transcripts that Ortega included in the book.
But Bast wasn’t working for a Swiss tycoon at all—he was doing the Church’s bidding, the book says. And he had caught Scientology’s Public Enemy No. 1 with dirty hands. Before they went through with some of the alleged schemes to attack Scientology, Cooper had discovered the damage she’d caused herself. Her reputation now seemed undone again.
Cooper’s lawyer Mike Flynn believed the tapes could actually benefit her case. “Whatever is on them, the fact that they hired someone to befriend you, given your vulnerabilities, will only backfire on them. Whatever you said would pale in comparison to what they put you through,” he said at the time, according to Ortega’s book.
Cooper’s lawyers expected that they’d have to spin Bast’s tapes in her favor in the many lawsuits she was facing. Yet not much was made of the taped chats with Bast until years later, when Cooper says she was confronted by researchers from a Scientology hub website, who asked her several questions about them.
The Daily Beast provided a Church spokeswoman with a list of some of the book’s claims, including Ortega’s contention that he found the man who called himself Jerry Levin (Ortega says he was known in Scientologist circles as Don Alverzo); that a Vanity Fair writer (who was friendly with Cooper) had been on Scientology’s payroll for years; and that Charles Manson was a Scientologist. Ortega says he worked off of many sources, including The New York Times and Cooper’s own book, in which she wrote that “one famous, in fact infamous person interested in Scientology that they do not boast about, talk about, or probably even want is Charles Manson, the convicted murderer of Sharon Tate and her friends.”
The Church stressed that it’s erroneous to say the convicted serial killer was a Scientologist. In the statement, a spokeswoman wrote that “the Church debunked the Manson myth four decades ago… Manson never had ties to Scientology.” While the Vanity Fair writer wasn’t named, Ortega says he did track down Alverzo, who allegedly played dumb on the phone. “I’m sorry, I don’t even understand what language you’re talking. I guess you have the wrong person,” Ortega says Alverzo told him.
Cooper says that she still has to look over her shoulder to make sure she is not being followed or watched by Scientology operatives. Since her run-in with Scientology, she’s gone on to pen almost two dozen books, though she’s steered clear of writing about the Church again.
Her newest book—Was Elvis Jewish? Plus Hundreds of Fascinating Facts: & Amazing Anecdotes no Rabbi Ever Told You—takes on the King of Rock & Roll and sets out to prove that his great-grandmother on his maternal side was Jewish. “He loved matzo-ball soup, his mother wanted him to be a doctor, and he had a nose job,” she told The Daily Beast. “Convinced?”
Meanwhile, “I’m hoping not to have too many problems when [Tony Ortega’s] book comes out,” she told The Daily Beast in a recent interview. “But the reality is that if you ever write a book against Scientology you have to be prepared to have them keep tabs on you for the rest of your life and I did a tremendous amount of damage to them over many many years so I have to accept the consequences.”

New Documents Show Scientologists Plotted To Have Writer Jailed
https://www.nytimes.com/1979/11/24/archives/new-documents-show-scientologists-plotted-to-have-writer-jailed.html

NOV. 24, 1979
About the Archive

This is a digitized version of an article from The Times’s print archive, before the start of online publication in 1996. To preserve these articles as they originally appeared, The Times does not alter, edit or update them.
Occasionally the digitization process introduces transcription errors or other problems.

Please send reports of such problems to archive_feedback@nytimes.com.

WASHINGTON, Nov. 23 (AP) — The Church of Scientology plotted to get a New York freelance writer who criticized the church sent either to jail or to a men- tal institution, according to court docu- ments made public today.
A church file dated April 1, 1976, described a plot called “Operation Freakout” that was directed at Paulette Cooper, whu in 1971 wrote a book entitled “The Scandal of Scientology.”
Church documents said the purpose of was to “get P.C. incarcerated in a mental institution or jail, or at least to hit her so hard that she drops her attacks.” Some documents mentioned specific plots in which the church planned to make bomb threats in Miss Cooper's name.
One bomb threat the church sent on her stationery resulted in her indictment on Federal charges. After two years of legal struggle, the charges were dropped.
The documents were among thousands the F.B.I. seized from the church's Los Angeles offices in 1977. Some were used to prepare a case against nine church officials who were convicted Oct. 26 of plotting to steal Government records on the church. Federal District Judge Charles R. Richey then ordered most of the church documents made public.
Miss Cooper said in an interview that the Scientologists had filed 14 libel suits against her book, made death threats and obscene phone calls and sent people phony letters about her sexual behavior. Miss Cooper is suing the church for $55 million, charging harassment.
Dennis McKenna, a church spokesman responding to the release of documents about Miss Cooper, said that the writer was “covertly working with the F.B.I. and other Federal agencies” to harm the church.

November 24, 1979, Page 12

Buy ReprintsThe New York Times ArchivesWikipedia as at 4th June, 2019 on the Early Life of Lafayette Ronald Hubbard

Lafayette Ronald Hubbard was born in 1911, in Tilden, Nebraska.[18] He was the only child of Ledora May (née Waterbury), who had trained as a teacher, and Harry Ross Hubbard, a former United States Navy officer.[19][20]After moving to Kalispell, Montana, they settled in Helena in 1913.[20] Hubbard's father rejoined the Navy in April 1917, during World War I, while his mother worked as a clerk for the state government.[21]

During the 1920s the Hubbards repeatedly relocated around the United States and overseas. After Hubbard's father Harry rejoined the Navy, his posting aboard the USS Oklahoma in 1921 required the family to relocate to the ship's home ports, first San Diego, then Seattle.[22] Hubbard was active in the Boy Scouts in Washington, D.C. and earned the rank of Eagle Scout in 1924, two weeks after his 13th birthday.

The following year, Harry Ross Hubbard was posted to Puget Sound Naval Shipyard at Bremerton, Washington.[23] His son was enrolled at Union High School, Bremerton,[23] and later studied at Queen Anne High School in Seattle.[24] In 1927 Hubbard's father was sent to the U.S. Naval Station on Guam. Hubbard's mother accompanied her husband, while their child was placed in his grandparents' care in Helena, Montana to complete his schooling.[24]

In 1927, Hubbard and his mother traveled to Guam. The trip consisted of a brief stop-over in a couple of Chinese ports before traveling on to Guam, where he stayed for six weeks before returning home. He recorded his impressions of the places he visited and disdained the poverty of the inhabitants of Japan and China, whom he described as "gooks" and "lazy [and] ignorant".[25][26][27]

After his return to the United States in September 1927, Hubbard enrolled at Helena High School, where he contributed to the school paper,[28] but earned only poor grades.[29] He abandoned school the following May and went back west to stay with his aunt and uncle in Seattle. He joined his parents in Guam in June 1928. His mother took over his education in the hope of putting him forward for the entrance examination to the United States Naval Academy at Annapolis, Maryland.

Between October and December 1928 a number of naval families, including Hubbard's, traveled from Guam to China aboard the cargo ship USS Gold Star. The ship stopped at Manila in the Philippines before traveling on to Qingdao (Tsingtao) in China. Hubbard and his parents made a side trip to Beijing before sailing on to Shanghai and Hong Kong, from where they returned to Guam.[30] Back on Guam, Hubbard spent much of his time writing dozens of short stories and essays[31] and failed the Naval Academy entrance examination.[32]

In September 1929, Hubbard was enrolled at the Swavely Preparatory School in Manassas, Virginia, to prepare him for a second attempt at the examination.[33] However, he was ruled out of consideration due to his near-sightedness.[34] He was instead sent to Woodward School for Boys in Washington, D.C. to qualify for admission to George Washington University. He successfully graduated from the school in June 1930 and entered the university the following September.[35]

Wikipedia as at 4th June, 2019  Lafayette Ronald Hubbard’s

University education and Caribbean trip

On September 24, 1930, Hubbard went to the School of Engineering at George Washington University, with a stated major of civil engineering at the behest of his father.[36][37] Academically, Hubbard did poorly: his transcripts show he failed many courses including atomic physics, though later in life he would claim to have been a nuclear physicist. In September 1931 he was placed on probation due to grades, and again on April 23, 1932 he was issued a warning due to his grades.[38]

During his first year, Hubbard helped organize the university Glider Club and was elected its president.[37]

During what would become Hubbard's final semester at GWU, he organized an ill-fated expedition to the Caribbean aboard the schooner Doris Hamlin commencing in June 1932. The aims of the "Caribbean Motion Picture Expedition" were stated as being to explore and film the pirate "strongholds and bivouacs of the Spanish Main" and to "collect whatever one collects for exhibits in museums".[39] It ran into trouble even before it left Baltimore: ten participants quit, and storms blew the ship far off course to Bermuda. Eleven more members of the expedition quit there and more still left when the ship arrived at Martinique.[40] With the expedition running critically short of money, the ship's owners ordered it to return to Baltimore.[41] Some of its participants made legal claims against him for refunds, and Hubbard failed to return to University the following year.[42]

After his father volunteered him for a Red Cross relief effort following 1932 San Ciprian hurricane, on October 23, 1932 Hubbard traveled aboard the USS Kittery to Puerto Rico.[43] Miller writes: "Somewhere between Norfolk, Virginia, and Port au Prince it seems that Ron decided to abandon the Red Cross". Instead, Hubbard appears to have done some work for a firm called West Indies Minerals Incorporated, accompanying a surveyor in an investigation of a small property near the town of Luquillo, Puerto Rico.[42]

Wikipedia as at 4th June, 2019  Lafayette Ronald Hubbard’s First marriage and early literary career

Hubbard returned from Puerto Rico to D.C. in February 1933. He struck up with a relationship with a fellow glider pilot named Margaret "Polly" Grubb.[45] Years later, Hubbard told his associates that his guardian angel, described as a "smiling woman," protected him when he was flying gliders.[46] The two were married on April 13.[45] She was already pregnant when they married, but had a miscarriage shortly afterwards; a few months later, she became pregnant again.[47] On May 7, 1934, she gave birth prematurely to a son who was named Lafayette Ronald Hubbard, Jr., whose nickname was "Nibs".[48] Their second child, Katherine May, was born on January 15, 1936.[49] The Hubbards lived for a while in Laytonsville, Maryland, but were chronically short of money.[50]

Hubbard became a well-known and prolific writer for pulp fiction magazines during the 1930s. His literary career began with contributions to the George Washington University student newspaper, The University Hatchet, as a reporter for a few months in 1931.[35] Six of his pieces were published commercially during 1932 to 1933.[51] The going rate for freelance writers at the time was only a cent a word, so Hubbard's total earnings from these articles would have been less than $100 (equivalent to $1,935 in 2018).[52] The pulp magazine Thrilling Adventure became the first to publish one of his short stories, in February 1934.[53] Over the next six years, pulp magazines published many of his short stories under a variety of pen names, including Winchester Remington Colt, Kurt von Rachen, René Lafayette, Joe Blitz and Legionnaire 148.[54]

Although he was best known for his fantasy and science fiction stories, Hubbard wrote in a wide variety of genres, including adventure fiction, aviation, travel, mysteries, westerns and even romance.[55] Hubbard knew and associated with writers such as Isaac Asimov, Robert A. Heinlein, L. Sprague de Camp and A. E. van Vogt.[56]

In the spring of 1936 they moved to Bremerton, Washington. They lived there for a time with Hubbard's aunts and grandmother before finding a place of their own at nearby South Colby. According to one of his friends at the time, Robert MacDonald Ford, the Hubbards were "in fairly dire straits for money" but sustained themselves on the income from Hubbard's writing.[57]

His first full-length novel, Buckskin Brigades, was published in 1937.[58] He became a "highly idiosyncratic" writer of science fiction after being taken under the wing of editor John W. Campbell,[59] who published many of Hubbard's short stories and also serialized a number of well-received novelettes that Hubbard wrote for Campbell's magazines Unknown and Astounding Science Fiction. These included Fear, Final Blackout and Typewriter in the Sky.[60]Science fiction newsletter Xignals reported that Hubbard wrote "over 100,000 words a month" during his peak. Martin Gardner asserted that his writing "[wa]s done at lightning speed."[61]

He wrote the script for The Secret of Treasure Island, a 1938 Columbia Pictures movie serial.[62]

Hubbard spent an increasing amount of time in New York City,[63] working out of a hotel room where his wife suspected him of carrying on affairs with other women.[64][65]

Near-death experience and Excalibur

Main article: Excalibur (L. Ron Hubbard)

Hubbard's authorship in mid-1938 of a still-unpublished manuscript called Excalibur is highlighted by the Church of Scientology as a key step in developing the principles of Scientology and Dianetics. The manuscript is said by Scientologists to have outlined "the basic principles of human existence"[66] and to have been the culmination of twenty years of research into "twenty-one races and cultures including Pacific Northwest Indian tribes, Philippine Tagalogs and, as he was wont to joke, the people of the Bronx".[67]

According to Arthur J. Cox, a contributor to John W. Campbell's Astounding Science Fiction magazine, Hubbard told a 1948 convention of science fiction fans that Excalibur's inspiration came during an operation in which he "died" for eight minutes.[68] Gerry Armstrong, Hubbard's archivist, explains this as a dental extraction performed under nitrous oxide, a chemical known for its hallucinogenic effects[69]:

Hubbard realized that, while he was dead, he had received a tremendous inspiration, a great Message which he must impart to others. He sat at his typewriter for six days and nights and nothing came out. Then, Excalibur emerged.[70]

Arthur J. Burks, the President of the American Fiction Guild, wrote that an excited Hubbard called him and said: "I want to see you right away. I have written THE book." Hubbard believed that Excalibur would "revolutionize everything" and that "it was somewhat more important, and would have a greater impact upon people, than the Bible."[71] It proposed that all human behavior could be explained in terms of survival and that to understand survival was to understand life.[72] As Hubbard biographer Jon Atack notes, "the notion that everything that exists is trying to survive became the basis of Dianetics and Scientology."[69]

According to Burks, Hubbard "was so sure he had something 'away out and beyond' anything else that he had sent telegrams to several book publishers, telling them that he had written 'THE book' and that they were to meet him at Penn Station, and he would discuss it with them and go with whomever gave him the best offer." However, nobody bought the manuscript.[71] Forrest J Ackerman, later Hubbard's literary agent, recalled that Hubbard told him "whoever read it either went insane or committed suicide. And he said that the last time he had shown it to a publisher in New York, he walked into the office to find out what the reaction was, the publisher called for the reader, the reader came in with the manuscript, threw it on the table and threw himself out of the skyscraper window."[73] Hubbard's failure to sell Excalibur depressed him; he told his wife in an October 1938 letter: "Writing action pulp doesn't have much agreement with what I want to do because it retards my progress by demanding incessant attention and, further, actually weakens my name. So you see I've got to do something about it and at the same time strengthen the old financial position."[74] He went on:

Sooner or later Excalibur will be published and I may have a chance to get some name recognition out of it so as to pave the way to articles and comments which are my ideas of writing heaven ... Foolishly perhaps, but determined none the less, I have high hopes of smashing my name into history so violently that it will take a legendary form even if all books are destroyed. That goal is the real goal as far as I am concerned.[74]

The manuscript later became part of Scientology mythology.[69] An early 1950s Scientology publication offered signed "gold-bound and locked" copies for the sum of $1,500 apiece (equivalent to $15,620 in 2018). It warned that "four of the first fifteen people who read it went insane" and that it would be "[r]eleased only on sworn statement not to permit other readers to read it. Contains data not to be released during Mr. Hubbard's stay on earth."[75]

Wikipedia as at 4th June, 2019  Lafayette Ronald Hubbard’s Alaska expedition
 
Ketchikan, Alaska, where Hubbard and his wife were stranded during the "Alaskan Radio-Experimental Expedition”

Hubbard joined The Explorers Club in February 1940 on the strength of his claimed explorations in the Caribbean and survey flights in the United States.[76] He persuaded the club to let him carry its flag on an "Alaskan Radio-Experimental Expedition" to update the U.S. Coast Pilot guide to the coastlines of Alaska and British Columbia and investigate new methods of radio position-finding.[77] The expedition consisted of Hubbard and his wife—the children were left at South Colby—aboard his ketch Magician.[78]

Hubbard told The Seattle Star in a November 1940 letter that the expedition was plagued by problems and did not get any further than Ketchikan near the southern end of the Alaska Panhandle, far from the Aleutian Islands.[79]Magician's engine broke down only two days after setting off in July 1940. The Hubbards reached Ketchikan on August 30, 1940, after many delays following repeated engine breakdowns. The Ketchikan Chronicle reported—making no mention of the expedition—that Hubbard's purpose in coming to Alaska "was two-fold, one to win a bet and another to gather material for a novel of Alaskan salmon fishing".[78] Having underestimated the cost of the trip, he did not have enough money to repair the broken engine. He raised money by writing stories and contributing to the local radio station[80] and eventually earned enough to fix the engine,[76] making it back to Puget Sound on December 27, 1940.[80]

Wikipedia as at 4th June, 2019  Lafayette Ronald Hubbard’s Military Career

After returning from Alaska, Hubbard applied to join the United States Navy. His friend Robert MacDonald Ford, by now a State Representative for Washington, sent a letter of recommendation describing Hubbard as "one of the most brilliant men I have ever known". Ford later said that Hubbard had written the letter himself: "I don't know why Ron wanted a letter. I just gave him a letter-head and said, 'Hell, you're the writer, you write it!'"[81]
Hubbard was commissioned as a Lieutenant (junior grade) in the U.S. Naval Reserve on July 19, 1941. By November, he was posted to New York for training as an Intelligence Officer.
On December 18, he was posted to the Philippines and set out for the posting via Australia. While in Melbourne awaiting transport to Manilla, Hubbard was sent back to the United States. The US Naval Attaché reported, "This officer is not satisfactory for independent duty assignment. He is garrulous and tries to give impressions of his importance. He also seems to think he has unusual ability in most lines. These characteristics indicate that he will require close supervision for satisfactory performance of any intelligence duty."[82]
After a brief stint censoring cables, Hubbard's request for sea duty was approved and he reported to a Neponset, Massachusetts shipyard which was converting a trawler into a gunboat to be classified as USS YP-422. On September 25, 1942, the Commandant of Boston Navy Yard informed Washington that, in his view, Hubbard was "not temperamentally fitted for independent command." Days later, on October 1, Hubbard was summarily relieved of his command.[82]
Hubbard was sent to Submarine Chaser Training, and in 1943 was posted to Portland, Oregon to take command of a submarine chaser, the USS PC-815, which was under construction.[83] On May 18, USS PC-815 sailed on her shakedown cruise, bound for San Diego. Only five hours into the voyage, Hubbard believed he had detected an enemy submarine. Hubbard spent the next 68 hours engaged in combat, until finally receiving orders to return to Astoria. Admiral Fletcher, commander of the Northwest Sea Frontier, concluded: "An analysis of all reports convinces me that there was no submarine in the area." Fletcher suggested Hubbard had mistaken a "known magnetic deposit" for an enemy sub.[82]
The following month, Hubbard unwittingly sailed the PC-815 into Mexican territorial waters and conducted gunnery practice off the Coronado Islands, in the belief that they were uninhabited and belonged to the United States. The Mexican government complained and Hubbard was relieved of command. A report written after the incident rated Hubbard as unsuitable for independent duties and "lacking in the essential qualities of judgment, leadership and cooperation". The report recommended he be assigned "duty on a large vessel where he can be properly supervised".[84]

Wikipedia as at 4th June, 2019  Lafayette Ronald Hubbard’s Hospitalizations

After being relieved of command of the PC-815, Hubbard was assigned to temporary duty in San Diego. There he began reporting sick, citing a variety of ailments, including malaria, ulcers, and back pains. Hubbard was admitted to the naval hospital for observation—he would remain there nearly three months.[82] Years later, Hubbard would privately write to himself: "Your stomach trouble you used as an excuse to keep the Navy from punishing you. You are free of the Navy."[85]

In 1944, Hubbard was posted to Portland where the USS Algol was under construction. The ship was commissioned in July and Hubbard served as the Navigation and Training Officer. Hubbard requested, and was granted, a transfer to the School of Military Government in Princeton. The night before his departure, the ship's log reports that "The Navigating Officer [Hubbard] reported to the OOD [Officer On Duty] that an attempt at sabatage [sic] had been made sometime between 1530-1600. A coke bottle filled with gasoline with a cloth wick inserted had been concealed among cargo which was to be hoisted aboard and stored in No 1 hold. It was discovered before being taken on board. ONI, FBI and NSD authorities reported on the scene and investigations were started."[86][82]

Hubbard attended school in Princeton until January 1945, when he was assigned to Monterey, California. In April, he again reported sick and was re-admitted to Oak Knoll Naval Hospital, Oakland.[82] His complaints included "headaches, rheumatism, conjunctivitis, pains in his side, stomach aches, pains in his shoulder, arthritis, haemorrhoids".[87]

An October 1945 Naval Board found that Hubbard was "considered physically qualified to perform duty ashore, preferably within the continental United States".[88] He was discharged from hospital on December 4, 1945, and transferred to inactive duty on February 17, 1946.

Hubbard would ultimately resign his commission after the publication of Dianetics, with effect from October 30, 1950.[89]

Wikipedia as at 4th June, 2019  Lafayette Ronald Hubbard’s occult involvement in Pasadena

Hubbard's life underwent a turbulent period immediately after the war. According to his own account, he "was abandoned by family and friends as a supposedly hopeless cripple and a probable burden upon them for the rest of my days".[90] His daughter Katherine presented a rather different version: his wife had refused to uproot their children from their home in Bremerton, Washington, to join him in California. Their marriage was by now in terminal difficulties and he chose to stay in California.[91]

In August 1945 Hubbard moved into the Pasadena mansion of John "Jack" Whiteside Parsons. A leading rocket propulsion researcher at the California Institute of Technology and a founder of the Jet Propulsion Laboratory, Parsons led a double life as an avid occultist and Thelemite, follower of the English ceremonial magician Aleister Crowley and leader of a lodge of Crowley's magical order, Ordo Templi Orientis (OTO).[17][92] He let rooms in the house only to tenants who he specified should be "atheists and those of a Bohemian disposition".[93]

Hubbard befriended Parsons and soon became sexually involved with Parsons's 21-year-old girlfriend, Sara "Betty" Northrup.[94] Despite this Parsons was very impressed with Hubbard and reported to Crowley:

[Hubbard] is a gentleman; he has red hair, green eyes, is honest and intelligent, and we have become great friends. He moved in with me about two months ago, and although Betty and I are still friendly, she has transferred her sexual affection to Ron. Although he has no formal training in Magick, he has an extraordinary amount of experience and understanding in the field. From some of his experiences I deduced that he is in direct touch with some higher intelligence, possibly his Guardian Angel. He describes his Angel as a beautiful winged woman with red hair whom he calls the Empress and who has guided him through his life and saved him many times. He is the most Thelemic person I have ever met and is in complete accord with our own principles.[95]

Hubbard, whom Parsons referred to in writing as "Frater H",[96] became an enthusiastic collaborator in the Pasadena OTO. The two men collaborated on the "Babalon Working", a sex magic ritual intended to summon an incarnation of Babalon, the supreme Thelemite Goddess. It was undertaken over several nights in February and March 1946 in order to summon an "elemental" who would participate in further sex magic.[97] As Richard Metzger describes it,

Parsons used his "magical wand" to whip up a vortex of energy so the elemental would be summoned. Translated into plain English, Parsons jerked off in the name of spiritual advancement whilst Hubbard (referred to as "The Scribe" in the diary of the event) scanned the astral plane for signs and visions.[98]

The "elemental" arrived a few days later in the form of Marjorie Cameron, who agreed to participate in Parsons' rites.[97] Soon afterwards, Parsons, Hubbard and Sara agreed to set up a business partnership, "Allied Enterprises", in which they invested nearly their entire savings—the vast majority contributed by Parsons. The plan was for Hubbard and Sara to buy yachts in Miami and sail them to the West Coast to sell for a profit. Hubbard had a different idea; he wrote to the U.S. Navy requesting permission to leave the country "to visit Central & South America & China" for the purposes of "collecting writing material"—in other words, undertaking a world cruise.[99] Aleister Crowley strongly criticized Parsons's actions, writing: "Suspect Ron playing confidence trick—Jack Parsons weak fool—obvious victim prowling swindlers." Parsons attempted to recover his money by obtaining an injunction to prevent Hubbard and Sara leaving the country or disposing of the remnants of his assets.[100] They attempted to sail anyway but were forced back to port by a storm. A week later, Allied Enterprises was dissolved. Parsons received only a $2,900 promissory note from Hubbard and returned home "shattered". He had to sell his mansion to developers soon afterwards to recoup his losses.[101]

Hubbard's fellow writers were well aware of what had happened between him and Parsons. L. Sprague de Camp wrote to Isaac Asimov on August 27, 1946, to tell him:

The more complete story of Hubbard is that he is now in Fla. living on his yacht with a man-eating tigress named Betty-alias-Sarah, another of the same kind ... He will probably soon thereafter arrive in these parts with Betty-Sarah, broke, working the poor-wounded-veteran racket for all its worth, and looking for another easy mark. Don't say you haven't been warned. Bob [Robert Heinlein] thinks Ron went to pieces morally as a result of the war. I think that's fertilizer, that he always was that way, but when he wanted to conciliate or get something from somebody he could put on a good charm act. What the war did was to wear him down to where he no longer bothers with the act.[102]

On August 10, 1946, Hubbard bigamously married Sara, while still married to Polly. It was not until 1947 that his first wife learned that he had remarried. Hubbard agreed to divorce Polly in June that year and the marriage was dissolved shortly afterwards, with Polly given custody of the children.[103]

During this period, Hubbard authored a document called The "Affirmations" (also referred to as the "Admissions"). They consist of a series of statements by and addressed to Hubbard, relating to various physical, sexual, psychological and social issues that he was encountering in his life. The Affirmations appear to have been intended to be used as a form of self-hypnosis with the intention of resolving the author's psychological problems and instilling a positive mental attitude. In her book, Reitman called the Affirmations "the most revealing psychological self-assessment, complete with exhortations to himself, that [Hubbard] had ever made."[104] Among the Affirmations:

"Your eyes are getting progressively better. They became bad when you used them as an excuse to escape the naval academy. You have no reason to keep them bad."
"Your stomach trouble you used as an excuse to keep the Navy from punishing you. You are free of the Navy."
"Your hip is a pose. You have a sound hip. It never hurts. Your shoulder never hurts."
"Your foot was an alibi. The injury is no longer needed."[85]
"You can tell all the romantic tales you wish. ... But you know which ones were lies ... You have enough real experience to make anecdotes forever. Stick to your true adventures."
"Masturbation does not injure or make insane. Your parents were in error. Everyone masturbates."[105]

Wikipedia as at 4th June, 2019  Lafayette Ronald Hubbard’s request for psychiatric treatment

After Hubbard's wedding to Sara, the couple settled at Laguna Beach, California, where Hubbard took a short-term job looking after a friend's yacht [106] before resuming his fiction writing to supplement the small disability allowance that he was receiving as a war veteran.[107] Working from a trailer in a run-down area of North Hollywood,[103] Hubbard sold a number of science fiction stories that included his Ole Doc Methuselah series and the serialized novels The End Is Not Yet and To the Stars.[59] However, he remained short of money and his son, L. Ron Hubbard Jr, testified later that Hubbard was dependent on his own father and Margaret's parents for money and his writings, which he was paid at a penny per word, never garnered him any more than $10,000 prior to the founding of Scientology.[108] He repeatedly wrote to the Veterans Administration (VA) asking for an increase in his war pension.

In October 1947 he wrote to request psychiatric treatment:

After trying and failing for two years to regain my equilibrium in civil life, I am utterly unable to approach anything like my own competence. My last physician informed me that it might be very helpful if I were to be examined and perhaps treated psychiatrically or even by a psychoanalyst. Toward the end of my service I avoided out of pride any mental examinations, hoping that time would balance a mind which I had every reason to suppose was seriously affected. I cannot account for nor rise above long periods of moroseness and suicidal inclinations, and have newly come to realize that I must first triumph above this before I can hope to rehabilitate myself at all. ... I cannot, myself, afford such treatment. 
Would you please help me?[109]

The VA eventually did increase his pension,[110] but his money problems continued. On August 31, 1948, he was arrested in San Luis Obispo, California, and subsequently pleaded guilty to a charge of petty theft, for which he was ordered to pay a $25 fine (equivalent to $261 in 2018).[111]

Wikipedia as at 4th June, 2019  Lafayette Ronald Hubbard’s involvement in the Origin of Dianetics

In 1948, Hubbard and his second wife Sara moved from California to Savannah, Georgia, where he would later claim to have "worked" as a "volunteer" in the psychiatric clinic. Hubbard later wrote of having observed a "Dr. Center" in Savannah.[112][113][114] In Savannah, Hubbard began to make the first public mentions of what was to become Dianetics.

He wrote in January 1949 that he was working on a "book of psychology" about "the cause and cure of nervous tension", which he was going to call The Dark Sword, Excalibur or Science of the Mind.[115] On March 8, 1949, Hubbard wrote to friend and fellow science-fiction author Robert Heinlein from Savannah, Georgia. Hubbard referenced Heinlein's earlier work Coventry, in which a utopian government has the ability to psychologically "cure" criminals of violent personality traits. Wrote Hubbard:
Well, you didn't specify in your book what actual reformation took place in the society to make supermen. Got to thinking about it other day. The system is Excalibur. It makes nul A's.
His first published articles in Dianetics were "Terra Incognita: The Mind" in the Explorer Club Journal and another one that impacted people more heavily in Astounding Science Fiction.[116]
In April 1949, Hubbard wrote to several professional organizations to offer his research.[117] None were interested, so he turned to his editor John W. Campbell, who was more receptive due to a long-standing fascination with fringe psychologies and psychic powers ("psionics") that "permeated both his fiction and non-fiction".[118]
Campbell invited Hubbard and Sara to move into a cottage at Bay Head, New Jersey, not far from his own home at Plainfield. In July 1949, Campbell recruited an acquaintance, Dr. Joseph Winter, to help develop Hubbard's new therapy of "Dianetics". Campbell told Winter:

With cooperation from some institutions, some psychiatrists, [Hubbard] has worked on all types of cases. Institutionalized schizophrenics, apathies, manics, depressives, perverts, stuttering, neuroses—in all, nearly 1000 cases. But just a brief sampling of each type; he doesn't have proper statistics in the usual sense. But he has one statistic. He has cured every patient he worked with. He has cured ulcers, arthritis, asthma.[119]
Hubbard collaborated with Campbell and Winter to refine his techniques,[120] testing them on science fiction fans recruited by Campbell.[121] The basic principle of Dianetics was that the brain recorded every experience and event in a person's life, even when unconscious. Bad or painful experiences were stored as what he called "engrams" in a "reactive mind". These could be triggered later in life, causing emotional and physical problems. By carrying out a process he called "auditing", a person could be regressed through his engrams to re-experiencing past experiences. This enabled engrams to be "cleared". The subject, who would now be in a state of "Clear", would have a perfectly functioning mind with an improved IQ and photographic memory.[122] The "Clear" would be cured of physical ailments ranging from poor eyesight to the common cold,[123] which Hubbard asserted were purely psychosomatic.[124]
Winter submitted a paper on Dianetics to the Journal of the American Medical Association and the American Journal of Psychiatry but both journals rejected it.[125] Hubbard and his collaborators decided to announce Dianetics in Campbell's Astounding Science Fictioninstead. In an editorial, Campbell said: "Its power is almost unbelievable; it proves the mind not only can but does rule the body completely; following the sharply defined basic laws set forth, physical ills such as ulcers, asthma and arthritis can be cured, as can all other psychosomatic ills."[126] The birth of Hubbard's second daughter Alexis Valerie, delivered by Winter on March 8, 1950, came in the middle of the preparations to launch Dianetics.[127] A "Hubbard Dianetic Research Foundation" was established in April 1950 in Elizabeth, New Jersey, with Hubbard, Sara, Winter and Campbell on the board of directors.
Hubbard described Dianetics as "the hidden source of all psychosomatic ills and human aberration" when he introduced Dianetics to the world in the 1950s. He further claimed that "skills have been developed for their invariable cure."[128] Dianetics was duly launched in Astounding's May 1950 issue and on May 9, Hubbard's companion book Dianetics: The Modern Science of Mental Health was published[129] by Hermitage House. Hubbard abandoned freelance writing in order to promote Dianetics, writing several books about it in the next decade, delivering an estimated 4,000 lectures while founding Dianetics research organizations.[130]

Wikipedia as at 4th June, 2019  Lafayette Ronald Hubbard’s involvement in the initial success of Dianetics

Dianetics was an immediate commercial success and sparked what Martin Gardner calls "a nationwide cult of incredible proportions".[131] By August 1950, Hubbard's book had sold 55,000 copies, was selling at the rate of 4,000 a week and was being translated into French, German and Japanese. Five hundred Dianetic auditing groups had been set up across the United States.[132]
Dianetics was poorly received by the press and the scientific and medical professions.[132] The American Psychological Association criticized Hubbard's claims as "not supported by empirical evidence".[133] Scientific American said that Hubbard's book contained "more promises and less evidence per page than any publication since the invention of printing",[134] while The New Republic called it a "bold and immodest mixture of complete nonsense and perfectly reasonable common sense, taken from long acknowledged findings and disguised and distorted by a crazy, newly invented terminology".[135] Some of Hubbard's fellow science fiction writers also criticized it; Isaac Asimovconsidered it "gibberish"[56] while Jack Williamson called it "a lunatic revision of Freudian psychology".[136]
Several famous individuals became involved with Dianetics. Aldous Huxley received auditing from Hubbard;[137] the poet Jean Toomer[138] and the science fiction writers Theodore Sturgeon[139] and A. E. van Vogt became trained Dianetics auditors. Van Vogt temporarily abandoned writing and became the head of the newly established Los Angeles branch of the Hubbard Dianetic Research Foundation. Other branches were established in New York, Washington, D.C., Chicago, and Honolulu.[140][141]
Although Dianetics was not cheap, a great many people were nonetheless willing to pay; van Vogt later recalled "doing little but tear open envelopes and pull out $500 checks from people who wanted to take an auditor's course".[140] Financial controls were lax. Hubbard himself took large sums with no explanation of what he was doing with it. On one occasion, van Vogt saw Hubbard taking a lump sum of $56,000 (equivalent to $0.5 million at 2010 prices) out of the Los Angeles Foundation's proceeds.[140] One of Hubbard's employees, Helen O'Brien, commented that at the Elizabeth, N.J. branch of the Foundation, the books showed that "a month's income of $90,000 is listed, with only $20,000 accounted for".[142]
Hubbard played a very active role in the Dianetics boom, writing, lecturing and training auditors. Many of those who knew him spoke of being impressed by his personal charisma. Jack Horner, who became a Dianetics auditor in 1950, later said, "He was very impressive, dedicated and amusing. The man had tremendous charisma; you just wanted to hear every word he had to say and listen for any pearl of wisdom."[143] Isaac Asimov recalled in his autobiography how, at a dinner party, he, Robert Heinlein, L. Sprague de Camp and their wives "all sat as quietly as pussycats and listened to Hubbard. He told tales with perfect aplomb and in complete paragraphs."[56] As Atack comments, he was "a charismatic figure who compelled the devotion of those around him".[144] Christopher Evans described the personal qualities that Hubbard brought to Dianetics and Scientology:
He undoubtedly has charisma, a magnetic lure of an indefinable kind which makes him the centre of attraction in any kind of gathering. He is also a compulsive talker and pontificator ... His restless energy keeps him on the go throughout a long day—he is a poor sleeper and rises very early—and provides part of the drive which has allowed him to found and propagate a major international organization.[145]

Wikipedia as at 4th June, 2019  Lafayette Ronald Hubbard’s involvement in the Collapse of the Dianetics Foundation and subsequent kidnappings

Hubbard's supporters soon began to have doubts about Dianetics. Winter became disillusioned and wrote that he had never seen a single convincing Clear: "I have seen some individuals who are supposed to have been 'clear,' but their behavior does not conform to the definition of the state. Moreover, an individual supposed to have been 'clear' has undergone a relapse into conduct which suggests an incipient psychosis."[146] He also deplored the Foundation's omission of any serious scientific research.[147]
Dianetics lost public credibility in August 1950 when a presentation by Hubbard before an audience of 6,000 at the Shrine Auditorium in Los Angeles failed disastrously.[148] He introduced a Clear named Sonya Bianca and told the audience that as a result of undergoing Dianetic therapy she now possessed perfect recall. However, Gardner writes, "in the demonstration that followed, she failed to remember a single formula in physics (the subject in which she was majoring) or the color of Hubbard's tie when his back was turned. At this point, a large part of the audience got up and left."[149]
Hubbard also faced other practitioners moving into leadership positions within the Dianetics community. It was structured as an open, public practice in which others were free to pursue their own lines of research and claim that their approaches to auditing produced better results than Hubbard's.[150] The community rapidly splintered and its members mingled Hubbard's ideas with a wide variety of esoteric and occult practices.
By late 1950, the Elizabeth, N.J. Foundation was in financial crisis and the Los Angeles Foundation was more than $200,000 in debt (equivalent to $1,718,950 in 2018).[152] Winter and Art Ceppos, the publisher of Hubbard's book, resigned under acrimonious circumstances.[137] Campbell also resigned, criticizing Hubbard for being impossible to work with, and blamed him for the disorganization and financial ruin of the Foundations. By the summer of 1951, the Elizabeth, N.J. Foundation and all of its branches had closed.[142]
The collapse of Hubbard's marriage to Sara created yet more problems. He had begun an affair with his 20-year-old public relations assistant in late 1950, while Sara started a relationship with Dianetics auditor Miles Hollister.[154] Hubbard secretly denounced the couple to the FBI in March 1951, portraying them in a letter as communist infiltrators. According to Hubbard, Sara was "currently intimate with [communists] but evidently under coercion. Drug addiction set in fall 1950. Nothing of this known to me until a few weeks ago." Hollister was described as having a "sharp chin, broad forehead, rather Slavic". He was said to be the "center of most turbulence in our organization" and "active and dangerous".[155] The FBI did not take Hubbard seriously: an agent annotated his correspondence with the comment, "Appears mental."[156]

Three weeks later, Hubbard and two Foundation staff seized Sara and his year-old daughter Alexis and forcibly took them to San Bernardino, California, where he attempted unsuccessfully to find a doctor to examine Sara and declare her insane.[157] He let Sara go but took Alexis to Havana, Cuba. Sara filed a divorce suit on April 23, 1951, that accused him of marrying her bigamously and subjecting her to sleep deprivation, beatings, strangulation, kidnapping and exhortations to commit suicide.[158] The case led to newspaper headlines such as "Ron Hubbard Insane, Says His Wife."[159] Sara finally secured the return of her daughter in June 1951 by agreeing to a settlement with her husband in which she signed a statement, written by him, declaring:
The things I have said about L. Ron Hubbard in courts and the public prints have been grossly exaggerated or entirely false. I have not at any time believed otherwise than that L. Ron Hubbard is a fine and brilliant man.[160]
Dianetics appeared to be on the edge of total collapse. However, it was saved by Don Purcell, a millionaire businessman and Dianeticist who agreed to support a new Foundation in Wichita, Kansas. Their collaboration ended after less than a year when they fell out over the future direction of Dianetics.[161] The Wichita Foundation became financially nonviable after a court ruled that it was liable for the unpaid debts of its defunct predecessor in Elizabeth, N.J. The ruling prompted Purcell and the other directors of the Wichita Foundation to file for voluntary bankruptcy in February 1952.[154] Hubbard resigned immediately and accused Purcell of having been bribed by the American Medical Association to destroy Dianetics.[161] Hubbard established a "Hubbard College" on the other side of town where he continued to promote Dianetics while fighting Purcell in the courts over the Foundation's intellectual property.[162]
Only six weeks after setting up the Hubbard College and marrying a staff member, 18-year-old Mary Sue Whipp, Hubbard closed it down and moved with his new bride to Phoenix, Arizona. He established a Hubbard Association of Scientologists International to promote his new "Science of Certainty"—Scientology.[163] Scientology and Dianetics have been differentiated as follows: Dianetics is all about releasing the mind from the "distorting influence of engrams", and Scientology "is the study and handling of the spirit in relation to itself, universes and other life".[164]

Wikipedia as at 4th June, 2019  Lafayette Ronald Hubbard’s involvement in the rise of Scientology
The Church of Scientology attributes its genesis to Hubbard's discovery of "a new line of research"—"that man is most fundamentally a spiritual being (a thetan)".[165] Non-Scientologist writers have suggested alternative motives: that he aimed "to reassert control over his creation",[151] that he believed "he was about to lose control of Dianetics",[161] or that he wanted to ensure "he would be able to stay in business even if the courts eventually awarded control of Dianetics and its valuable copyrights to ... the hated Don Purcell."[166] Harlan Ellison has told a story of seeing Hubbard at a gathering of the Hydra Club in 1953 or 1954. Hubbard was complaining of not being able to make a living on what he was being paid as a science fiction writer. Ellison says that Lester del Rey told Hubbard that what he needed to do to get rich was start a religion.[167]
Hubbard expanded upon the basics of Dianetics to construct a spiritually oriented (though at this stage not religious) doctrine based on the concept that the true self of a person was a thetan — an immortal, omniscient and potentially omnipotent entity.[168] Hubbard taught that thetans, having created the material universe, had forgotten their god-like powers and become trapped in physical bodies.[169] Scientology aimed to "rehabilitate" each person's self (the thetan) to restore its original capacities and become once again an "Operating Thetan".[166][168] Hubbard insisted humanity was imperiled by the forces of "aberration", which were the result of engrams carried by immortal thetans for billions of years.[161]
In 2012, Ohio State University professor Hugh Urban[170] asserted that Hubbard had adopted many of his theories from the early to mid 20th century astral projection pioneer Sylvan Muldoon stating that Hubbard's description of exteriorizing the thetan is extremely similar if not identical to the descriptions of astral projection in occult literature popularized by Muldoon's widely read Phenomena of Astral Projection (1951) (co-written with Hereward Carrington)[171] and that Muldoon's description of the astral body as being connected to the physical body by a long thin, elastic cord is virtually identical to the one described in Hubbard's "Excalibur" vision.[172]
Hubbard introduced a device called an E-meter that he presented as having, as Miller puts it, "an almost mystical power to reveal an individual's innermost thoughts".[173] He promulgated Scientology through a series of lectures, bulletins and books such as A History of Man ("a cold-blooded and factual account of your last sixty trillion years")[173] and Scientology: 8-8008 ("With this book, the ability to make one's body old or young at will, the ability to heal the ill without physical contact, the ability to cure the insane and the incapacitated, is set forth for the physician, the layman, the mathematician and the physicist.")[174]
Scientology was organized in a very different way from the decentralized Dianetics movement. The Hubbard Association of Scientologists (HAS) was the only official Scientology organization. Training procedures and doctrines were standardized and promoted through HAS publications, and administrators and auditors were not permitted to deviate from Hubbard's approach.[151] Branches or "orgs" were organized as franchises, rather like a fast food restaurantchain. Each franchise holder was required to pay ten percent of income to Hubbard's central organization. They were expected to find new recruits, known as "raw meat", but were restricted to providing only basic services. Costlier higher-level auditing was only provided by Hubbard's central organization.[175]

Although this model would eventually be extremely successful, Scientology was a very small-scale movement at first. Hubbard started off with only a few dozen followers, generally dedicated Dianeticists; a seventy-hour series of lectures in Philadelphia in December 1952 was attended by just 38 people.[176] Hubbard was joined in Phoenix by his 18-year-old son Nibs, who had been unable to settle down in high school.[177] Nibs had decided to become a Scientologist, moved into his father's home and went on to become a Scientology staff member and "professor".[178] Hubbard also traveled to the United Kingdom to establish his control over a Dianetics group in London. It was very much a shoestring operation; as Helen O'Brien later recalled, "there was an atmosphere of extreme poverty and undertones of a grim conspiracy over all. At 163 Holland Park Avenue was an ill-lit lecture room and a bare-boarded and poky office some eight by ten feet—mainly infested by long haired men and short haired and tatty women."[179]On September 24, 1952, only a few weeks after arriving in London, Hubbard's wife Mary Sue gave birth to her first child, a daughter whom they named Diana Meredith de Wolfe Hubbard.[180]
In February 1953, Hubbard acquired a doctorate from the unaccredited degree mill called Sequoia University.[181][182][181]
As membership declined and finances grew tighter, Hubbard had reversed the hostility to religion he voiced in Dianetics.[183][183] A few weeks after becoming "Dr." Hubbard, he authored a letter outlining plans for transforming Scientology into a religion. In that letter, Hubbard proposed setting up a chain of "Spiritual Guidance Centers" charging customers $500 for twenty-four hours of auditing proposing that Scientology should be transformed into a religion:[184]
We don't want a clinic. We want one in operation but not in name. Perhaps we could call it a Spiritual Guidance Center. Think up its name, will you. And we could put in nice desks and our boys in neat blue with diplomas on the walls and 1. knock psychotherapy into history and 2. make enough money to shine up my operating scope and 3. keep the HAS solvent. It is a problem of practical business.
I await your reaction on the religion angle. In my opinion, we couldn't get worse public opinion than we have had or have less customers with what we've got to sell.[185]
The letter's recipient, Helen O'Brien, resigned the following September.[186] She criticized Hubbard for creating "a temperate zone voodoo, in its inelasticity, unexplainable procedures, and mindless group euphoria".[187]
The idea may not have been new; Hubbard has been quoted as telling a science fiction convention in 1948: "Writing for a penny a word is ridiculous. If a man really wants to make a million dollars, the best way would be to start his own religion."[156][188][189] Scholar J. Gordon Melton notes, "There is no record of Hubbard having ever made this statement, though several of his science fiction colleagues have noted the broaching of the subject on one of their informal conversations."[190]
Despite objections, on December 18, 1953, Hubbard incorporated the Church of Scientology, Church of American Science and Church of Spiritual Engineering in Camden, New Jersey.[191] Hubbard, his wife Mary Sue and his secretary John Galusha became the trustees of all three corporations.[192][193] The reason for Scientology's religious transformation was explained by officials of the HAS:
[T]here is little doubt but what [sic] this stroke will remove Scientology from the target area of overt and covert attacks by the medical profession, who see their pills, scalpels, and appendix-studded incomes threatened ... [Scientologists] can avoid the recent fiasco in which a Pasadena practitioner is reported to have spent 10 days in that city's torture chamber for "practicing medicine without a license."[194]
Scientology franchises became Churches of Scientology and some auditors began dressing as clergymen, complete with clerical collars. If they were arrested in the course of their activities, Hubbard advised, they should sue for massive damages for molesting "a Man of God going about his business".[191] A few years later he told Scientologists: "If attacked on some vulnerable point by anyone or anything or any organization, always find or manufacture enough threat against them to cause them to sue for peace ... Don't ever defend, always attack."[195] Any individual breaking away from Scientology and setting up his own group was to be shut down:
The purpose of the suit is to harass and discourage rather than to win. The law can be used very easily to harass, and enough harassment on somebody who is simply on the thin edge anyway, well knowing that he is not authorized, will generally be sufficient to cause his professional decease. If possible, of course, ruin him utterly.[196]
The 1950s saw Scientology growing steadily. Hubbard finally achieved victory over Don Purcell in 1954 when the latter, worn out by constant litigation, handed the copyrights of Dianetics back to Hubbard.[197] Most of the formerly independent Scientology and Dianetics groups were either driven out of business or were absorbed into Hubbard's organizations.[198] Hubbard marketed Scientology through medical claims, such as attracting polio sufferers by presenting the Church of Scientology as a scientific research foundation investigating polio cases.[199] One advertisement during this period stated:
Plagued by illness? We'll make you able to have good health. Get processed by the finest capable auditors in the world today ... Personally coached and monitored by L. Ron Hubbard.[200]
Scientology became a highly profitable enterprise for Hubbard.[201] He implemented a scheme under which he was paid a percentage of the Church of Scientology's gross income and by 1957 he was being paid about $250,000 (equivalent to US$2,230,154 in 2018).[202]His family grew, too, with Mary Sue giving birth to three more children—Geoffrey Quentin McCaully on January 6, 1954;[186] Mary Suzette Rochelle on February 13, 1955;[203] and Arthur Ronald Conway on June 6, 1958.[204] In the spring of 1959, he used his new-found wealth to purchase Saint Hill Manor, an 18th-century country house in Sussex, formerly owned by Sawai Man Singh II, the Maharaja of Jaipur. The house became Hubbard's permanent residence and an international training center for Scientologists.[199]

Wikipedia as at 4th June, 2019  Lafayette Ronald Hubbard’s involvement in the Contoversies of Scientology

By the start of the 1960s, Hubbard was the leader of a worldwide movement with thousands of followers. A decade later, however, he had left Saint Hill Manor and moved aboard his own private fleet of ships as the Church of Scientology faced worldwide controversy.

The Church of Scientology says that the problems of this period were due to "vicious, covert international attacks" by the United States government, "all of which were proven false and baseless, which were to last 27 years and finally culminated in the Government being sued for 750 million dollars for conspiracy."[205] Behind the attacks, stated Hubbard, lay a vast conspiracy of "psychiatric front groups" secretly controlling governments: "Every single lie, false charge and attack on Scientology has been traced directly to this group's members. They have sought at great expense for nineteen years to crush and eradicate any new development in the field of the mind. They are actively preventing any effectiveness in this field."[206]
Hubbard believed that Scientology was being infiltrated by saboteurs and spies and introduced "security checking"[195] to identify those he termed "potential trouble sources" and "suppressive persons". Members of the Church of Scientology were interrogated with the aid of E-meters and were asked questions such as "Have you ever practiced homosexuality?" and "Have you ever had unkind thoughts about L. Ron Hubbard?"[207] For a time, Scientologists were even interrogated about crimes committed in past lives: "Have you ever destroyed a culture?" "Did you come to Earth for evil purposes?" "Have you ever zapped anyone?"[208]
He also sought to exert political influence, advising Scientologists to vote against Richard Nixon in the 1960 presidential election and establishing a Department of Government Affairs "to bring government and hostile philosophies or societies into a state of complete compliance with the goals of Scientology". This, he said, "is done by high-level ability to control and in its absence by a low-level ability to overwhelm. Introvert such agencies. Control such agencies."[209]
The U.S. Government was already well aware of Hubbard's activities. The FBI had a lengthy file on him, including a 1951 interview with an agent who considered him a "mental case".[153] Police forces in a number of jurisdictions began exchanging information about Scientology through the auspices of Interpol, which eventually led to prosecutions.[210] In 1958, the U.S. Internal Revenue Service withdrew the Washington, D.C. Church of Scientology's tax exemption after it found that Hubbard and his family were profiting unreasonably from Scientology's ostensibly non-profit income.[201] The Food and Drug Administration took action against Scientology's medical claims, seizing thousands of pills being marketed as "radiation cures"[211] as well as publications and E-meters. The Church of Scientology was required to label them as being "ineffective in the diagnosis or treatment of disease".[212]
Following the FDA's actions, Scientology attracted increasingly unfavorable publicity across the English-speaking world.[213] It faced particularly hostile scrutiny in Victoria, Australia, where it was accused of brainwashing, blackmail, extortion and damaging the mental health of its members.[214] The Victorian state government established a Board of Inquiry into Scientology in November 1963.[215] Its report, published in October 1965, condemned every aspect of Scientology and Hubbard himself. He was described as being of doubtful sanity, having a persecution complex and displaying strong indications of paranoid schizophrenia with delusions of grandeur. His writings were characterized as nonsensical, abounding in "self-glorification and grandiosity, replete with histrionics and hysterical, incontinent outbursts".[216] Sociologist Roy Wallis comments that the report drastically changed public perceptions of Scientology:
The former conception of the movement as a relatively harmless, if cranky, health and self-improvement cult, was transformed into one which portrayed it as evil, dangerous, a form of hypnosis (with all the overtones of Svengali in the layman's mind), and brainwashing.[214]
The report led to Scientology being banned in Victoria,[217] Western Australia and South Australia,[218] and led to more negative publicity around the world. Newspapers and politicians in the UK pressed the British government for action against Scientology. In April 1966, hoping to form a remote "safe haven" for Scientology, Hubbard traveled to the southern African country Rhodesia (today Zimbabwe) and looked into setting up a base there at a hotel on Lake Kariba. Despite his attempts to curry favour with the local government—he personally delivered champagne to Prime Minister Ian Smith's house, but Smith refused to see him—Rhodesia promptly refused to renew Hubbard's visa, compelling him to leave the country.[219] In July 1968, the British Minister of Health, Kenneth Robinson, announced that foreign Scientologists would no longer be permitted to enter the UK and Hubbard himself was excluded from the country as an "undesirable alien".[220] Further inquiries were launched in Canada, New Zealand and South Africa.[218]
Hubbard took three major new initiatives in the face of these challenges. "Ethics Technology" was introduced to tighten internal discipline within Scientology. It required Scientologists to "disconnect" from any organization or individual—including family members—deemed to be disruptive or "suppressive".[221] According to church-operated websites, "A person who disconnects is simply exercising his right to communicate or not to communicate with a particular person." Hubbard stated: "Communication, however, is a two-way flow. If one has the right to communicate, then one must also have the right to not receive communication from another. It is this latter corollary of the right to communicate that gives us our right to privacy."[222] Scientologists were also required to write "Knowledge Reports" on each other, reporting transgressions or misapplications of Scientology methods. Hubbard promulgated a long list of punishable "Misdemeanors", "Crimes", and "High Crimes".[223] The "Fair Game" policy was introduced, which was applicable to anyone deemed an "enemy" of Scientology: "May be deprived of property or injured by any means by any Scientologist without any discipline of the Scientologist. May be tricked, sued or lied to or destroyed."[224][225]
At the start of March 1966, Hubbard created the Guardian's Office (GO), a new agency within the Church of Scientology that was headed by his wife Mary Sue.[226] It dealt with Scientology's external affairs, including public relations, legal actions and the gathering of intelligence on perceived threats.[227] As Scientology faced increasingly negative media attention, the GO retaliated with hundreds of writs for libel and slander; it issued more than forty on a single day.[228] Hubbard ordered his staff to find "lurid, blood sex crime actual evidence [sic] on [Scientology's] attackers".[229]
Finally, at the end of 1966, Hubbard acquired his own fleet of ships.[17] He established the "Hubbard Explorational Company Ltd" which purchased three ships—the Enchanter, a forty-ton schooner,[230] the Avon River, an old trawler,[231] and the Royal Scotman [sic], a former Irish Sea cattle ferry that he made his home and flagship.[232] The ships were crewed by the Sea Organization or Sea Org, a group of Scientologist volunteers, with the support of a couple of professional seamen.[17][233]
 
Commodore of the Sea Org
After Hubbard created the Sea Org "fleet" in early 1967 it began an eight-year voyage, sailing from port to port in the Mediterranean Sea and eastern North Atlantic. The fleet traveled as far as Corfu in the eastern Mediterranean and Dakar and the Azores in the Atlantic, but rarely stayed anywhere for longer than six weeks. Ken Urquhart, Hubbard's personal assistant at the time, later recalled:
[Hubbard] said we had to keep moving because there were so many people after him. If they caught up with him they would cause him so much trouble that he would be unable to continue his work, Scientology would not get into the world and there would be social and economic chaos, if not a nuclear holocaust.[234]
When Hubbard established the Sea Org he publicly declared that he had relinquished his management responsibilities. According to Miller, this was not true. He received daily telex messages from Scientology organizations around the world reporting their statistics and income. The Church of Scientology sent him $15,000 (equivalent to $112,710 in 2018) a week and millions of dollars were transferred to his bank accounts in Switzerland and Liechtenstein.[235]Couriers arrived regularly, conveying luxury food for Hubbard and his family[236] or cash that had been smuggled from England to avoid currency export restrictions.[237]

Along the way, Hubbard sought to establish a safe haven in "a friendly little country where Scientology would be allowed to prosper", as Miller puts it.[238] The fleet stayed at Corfu for several months in 1968–1969. Hubbard renamed the ships after Greek gods—the Royal Scotman was rechristened Apollo—and he praised the recently established military dictatorship.[237] The Sea Org was represented as "Professor Hubbard's Philosophy School" in a telegram to the Greek government.[239] In March 1969, however, Hubbard and his ships were ordered to leave.[240] In mid-1972, Hubbard tried again in Morocco, establishing contacts with the country's secret police and training senior policemen and intelligence agents in techniques for detecting subversives.[241] The program ended in failure when it became caught up in internal Moroccan politics, and Hubbard left the country hastily in December 1972.[242]
At the same time, Hubbard was still developing Scientology's doctrines. A Scientology biography states that "free of organizational duties and aided by the first Sea Org members, L. Ron Hubbard now had the time and facilities to confirm in the physical universe some of the events and places he had encountered in his journeys down the track of time."[243] In 1965, he designated several existing Scientology courses as confidential, repackaging them as the first of the esoteric "OT levels".[244] Two years later he announced the release of OT3, the "Wall of Fire", revealing the secrets of an immense disaster that had occurred "on this planet, and on the other seventy-five planets which form this Confederacy, seventy-five million years ago".[245] Scientologists were required to undertake the first two OT levels before learning how Xenu, the leader of the Galactic Confederacy, had shipped billions of people to Earth and blown them up with hydrogen bombs, following which their traumatized spirits were stuck together at "implant stations", brainwashed with false memories and eventually became contained within human beings.[246] The discovery of OT3 was said to have taken a major physical toll on Hubbard, who announced that he had broken a knee, an arm, and his back during the course of his research.[247] A year later, in 1968, he unveiled OT levels 4 to 6 and began delivering OT training courses to Scientologists aboard the Royal Scotman.[248]
Scientologists around the world were presented with a glamorous picture of life in the Sea Org and many applied to join Hubbard aboard the fleet.[248] What they found was rather different from the image. Most of those joining had no nautical experience at all.[248]Mechanical difficulties and blunders by the crews led to a series of embarrassing incidents and near-disasters. Following one incident in which the rudder of the Royal Scotman was damaged during a storm, Hubbard ordered the ship's entire crew to be reduced to a "condition of liability" and wear gray rags tied to their arms.[249] The ship itself was treated the same way, with dirty tarpaulins tied around its funnel to symbolize its lower status. According to those aboard, conditions were appalling; the crew was worked to the point of exhaustion, given meagre rations and forbidden to wash or change their clothes for several weeks.[250] Hubbard maintained a harsh disciplinary regime aboard the fleet, punishing mistakes by confining people in the Royal Scotman's bilge tanks without toilet facilities and with food provided in buckets.[251] At other times erring crew members were thrown overboard with Hubbard looking on and, occasionally, filming.[252] David Mayo, a Sea Org member at the time, later recalled:
We tried not to think too hard about his behavior. It was not rational much of the time, but to even consider such a thing was a discreditable thought and you couldn't allow yourself to have a discreditable thought. One of the questions in a sec[urity] check was, "Have you ever had any unkind thoughts about LRH?" and you could get into very serious trouble if you had. So you tried hard not to.[253]
From about 1970, Hubbard was attended aboard ship by the children of Sea Org members, organized as the Commodore's Messenger Organization (CMO). They were mainly young girls dressed in hot pants and halter tops, who were responsible for running errands for Hubbard such as lighting his cigarettes, dressing him or relaying his verbal commands to other members of the crew.[254][255] In addition to his wife Mary Sue, he was accompanied by all four of his children by her, though not his first son Nibs, who had defected from Scientology in late 1959.[256] The younger Hubbards were all members of the Sea Org and shared its rigors, though Quentin Hubbard reportedly found it difficult to adjust and attempted suicide in mid-1974.[257]

 Life in Hiding
During the 1970s, Hubbard faced an increasing number of legal threats. French prosecutors charged him and the French Church of Scientology with fraud and customs violations in 1972. He was advised that he was at risk of being extradited to France.[258] Hubbard left the Sea Org fleet temporarily at the end of 1972, living incognito in Queens, New York,[259] until he returned to his flagship in September 1973 when the threat of extradition had abated.[260]Scientology sources say that he carried out "a sociological study in and around New York City".[261]
Hubbard's health deteriorated significantly during this period. A chain-smoker, he also suffered from bursitis and excessive weight, and had a prominent growth on his forehead.[262] He suffered serious injuries in a motorcycle accident in 1973 and had a heart attack in 1975 that required him to take anticoagulant drugs for the next year.[263] In September 1978, Hubbard had a pulmonary embolism, falling into a coma, but recovered.[264]
He remained active in managing and developing Scientology, establishing the controversial Rehabilitation Project Force in 1974[265] and issuing policy and doctrinal bulletins.[266] However, the Sea Org's voyages were coming to an end. The Apollo was banned from several Spanish ports[266] and was expelled from Curaçao in October 1975.[267] The Sea Org came to be suspected of being a CIA operation, leading to a riot in Funchal, Madeira, when the Apollodocked there. At the time, The Apollo Stars, a musical group founded by Hubbard and made up entirely of ship-bound members of the Sea Org, was offering free on-pier concerts in an attempt to promote Scientology, and the riot occurred at one of these events. Hubbard decided to relocate back to the United States to establish a "land base" for the Sea Org in Florida.[268] The Church of Scientology attributes this decision to the activities on the Apollohaving "outgrow[n] the ship's capacity".[261]
In October 1975, Hubbard moved into a hotel suite in Daytona Beach. The Fort Harrison Hotel in Clearwater, Florida, was secretly acquired as the location for the "land base".[268] On December 5, 1975, Hubbard and his wife Mary Sue moved into a condominium complex in nearby Dunedin.[269] Their presence was meant to be a closely guarded secret but was accidentally compromised the following month.[270] Hubbard immediately left Dunedin and moved to Georgetown, Washington, D.C., accompanied by a handful of aides and messengers, but not his wife.[271] Six months later, following another security alert in July 1976, Hubbard moved to another safe house in Culver City, California. He lived there for only about three months, relocating in October to the more private confines of the Olive Tree Ranch near La Quinta.[272] His second son Quentin committed suicide a few weeks later in Las Vegas.[273][274]
Throughout this period, Hubbard was heavily involved in directing the activities of the Guardian's Office (GO), the legal bureau/intelligence agency that he had established in 1966. He believed that Scientology was being attacked by an international Nazi conspiracy, which he termed the "Tenyaka Memorial", through a network of drug companies, banks and psychiatrists in a bid to take over the world.[275] In 1973, he instigated the "Snow White Program" and directed the GO to remove negative reports about Scientology from government files and track down their sources.[276] The GO was ordered to "get all false and secret files on Scientology, LRH  ... that cannot be obtained legally, by all possible lines of approach ... i.e., job penetration, janitor penetration, suitable guises utilizing covers." His involvement in the GO's operations was concealed through the use of codenames. The GO carried out covert campaigns on his behalf such as Operation Bulldozer Leak, intended "to effectively spread the rumor that will lead Government, media, and individual [Suppressive Persons] to conclude that LRH has no control of the C of S and no legal liability for Church activity". He was kept informed of GO operations, such as the theft of medical records from a hospital, harassment of psychiatrists and infiltrations of organizations that had been critical of Scientology at various times, such as the Better Business Bureau, the American Medical Association, and American Psychiatric Association.[277]
Members of the GO infiltrated and burglarized numerous government organizations, including the U.S. Department of Justice and the Internal Revenue Service.[278] After two GO agents were caught in the Washington, D.C. headquarters of the IRS, the FBI carried out simultaneous raids on GO offices in Los Angeles and Washington, D.C. on July 7, 1977. They retrieved wiretap equipment, burglary tools and some 90,000 pages of incriminating documents. Hubbard was not prosecuted, though he was labeled an "unindicted co-conspirator" by government prosecutors. His wife Mary Sue was indicted and subsequently convicted of conspiracy. She was sent to a federal prison along with ten other Scientologists.[279]

Hubbard's troubles increased in February 1978 when a French court convicted him in absentia for obtaining money under false pretenses. He was sentenced to four years in prison and a 35,000FF ($7,000) fine, equivalent to $26,889 in 2018.[280] He went into hiding in April 1979, moving to an apartment in Hemet, California, where his only contact with the outside world was via ten trusted essengers. He cut contact with everyone else, even his wife, whom he saw for the last time in August 1979.[281] Hubbard faced a possible indictment for his role in Operation Freakout, the GO's campaign against New York journalist Paulette Cooper, and in February 1980 he disappeared into deep cover in the company of two trusted messengers, Pat and Anne Broeker.[282][283]

For the first few years of the 1980s, Hubbard and the Broekers lived on the move, touring the Pacific Northwest in a recreational vehicle and living for a while in apartments in Newport Beach and Los Angeles.[284] Hubbard used his time in hiding to write his first new works of science fiction for nearly thirty years—Battlefield Earth (1982) and Mission Earth, a ten-volume series published between 1985 and 1987.[285] They received mixed responses; as writer Jeff Walker puts it, they were "treated derisively by most critics but greatly admired by followers".[286] Hubbard also wrote and composed music for three of his albums, which were produced by the Church of Scientology. The book soundtrack Space Jazz was released in 1982.[287] Mission Earth and The Road to Freedom were released posthumously in 1986.[288]

In Hubbard's absence, members of the Sea Org staged a takeover of the Church of Scientology and purged many veteran Scientologists. A young messenger, David Miscavige, became Scientology's de facto leader. Mary Sue Hubbard was forced to resign her position and her daughter Suzette became Miscavige's personal maid.[289]

 Death and Legacy of l Ron Hubbard
For the last two years of his life, Hubbard lived in a luxury Blue Bird motorhome on Whispering Winds, a 160-acre ranch near Creston, California. He remained in deep hiding while controversy raged in the outside world about whether he was still alive and if so, where. He spent his time "writing and researching", according to a spokesperson, and pursued photography and music, overseeing construction work and checking on his animals.[290] He repeatedly redesigned the property, spending millions of dollars remodeling the ranch house—which went virtually uninhabited—and building a quarter-mile horse-racing track with an observation tower, which reportedly was never used.[284]
He was still closely involved in managing the Church of Scientology via secretly delivered orders[284] and continued to receive large amounts of money, of which Forbes magazine estimated "at least $200 million [was] gathered in Hubbard's name through 1982." In September 1985, the IRS notified the Church that it was considering indicting Hubbard for tax fraud.[291]
Hubbard suffered further ill-health, including chronic pancreatitis, during his residence at Whispering Winds. He suffered a stroke on January 17, 1986, and died a week later.[279][292] His body was cremated and the ashes were scattered at sea.[293] Scientology leaders announced that his body had become an impediment to his work and that he had decided to "drop his body" to continue his research on another planet,[294] having "learned how to do it without a body".[295]
Hubbard was survived by his wife Mary Sue and all of his children except his second son Quentin. His will provided a trust fund to support Mary Sue; her children Arthur, Diana and Suzette; and Katherine, the daughter of his first wife Polly.[296] He disinherited two of his other children.[297] L. Ron Hubbard, Jr. had become estranged, changed his name to "Ronald DeWolf" and, in 1982, sued unsuccessfully for control of his father's estate.[298] Alexis Valerie, Hubbard's daughter by his second wife Sara, had attempted to contact her father in 1971. She was rebuffed with the implied claim that her real father was Jack Parsons rather than Hubbard, and that her mother had been a Nazi spy during the war.[299] Both later accepted settlements when litigation was threatened.[297] In 2001, Diana and Suzette were reported to still be Church members, while Arthur had left and become an artist. Hubbard's great-grandson, Jamie DeWolf, is a noted slam poet.[300]
The copyrights of his works and much of his estate and wealth were willed to the Church of Scientology.[301]

 In a bulletin dated May 5, 1980, Hubbard told his followers to preserve his teachings until an eventual reincarnation when he would return "not as a religious leader but as a political one".[15]

 The Church of Spiritual Technology (CST), a sister organization of the Church of Scientology, has engraved Hubbard's entire corpus of Scientology and Dianetics texts on steel tablets stored in titanium containers. They are buried at the Trementina Base in a vault under a mountain near Trementina, New Mexico, on top of which the CST's logo has been bulldozed on such a gigantic scale that it is visible from space.[302][303]
Hubbard is the Guinness World Record holder for the most published author, with 1,084 works,[304] most translated book (70 languages for The Way to Happiness)[305] and most audiobooks (185 as of April 2009).[306] According to Galaxy Press, Hubbard's Battlefield Earth has sold over 6 million copies and Mission Earth a further 7 million, with each of its ten volumes becoming New York Times bestsellers on their release;[307] however, the Los Angeles Times reported in 1990 that Hubbard's followers had been buying large numbers of the books and re-issuing them to stores, so as to boost sales figures.[308] Opinions are divided about his literary legacy. Scientologists have written of their desire to "make Ron the most acclaimed and widely known author of all time".[308] The sociologist William Sims Bainbridge writes that even at his peak in the late 1930s Hubbard was regarded by readers of Astounding Science Fiction as merely "a passable, familiar author but not one of the best", while by the late 1970s "the [science fiction] subculture wishes it could forget him" and fans gave him a worse rating than any other of the "Golden Age" writers.[309]
Posthumously, the Los Angeles City Council named a part of the street close to the headquarters of Scientology in 1996, as recognition of Hubbard.[310] In 2011, the West Valley City Council declared March 13 as L. Ron Hubbard Centennial Day.[311] In April 2016, the New Jersey State Board of Education approved Hubbard's birthday as one of its religious holidays.[312][313]
In 2004, eighteen years after Hubbard's death, the Church claimed eight million followers worldwide. According to religious scholar J. Gordon Melton, this is an overestimate, counting as Scientologists people who had merely bought a book.[314] The City University of New York's American Religious Identification Survey found that by 2009 only 25,000 Americans identified as Scientologists.[315] Hubbard's presence still pervades Scientology. Every Church of Scientology maintains an office reserved for Hubbard, with a desk, chair and writing equipment, ready to be used.[301] Lonnie D. Kliever notes that Hubbard was "the only source of the religion, and he has no successor". Hubbard is referred to simply as "Source" within Scientology and the theological acceptability of any Scientology-related activity is determined by how closely it adheres to Hubbard's doctrines.[316] Hubbard's name and signature are official trademarks of the Religious Technology Center, established in 1982 to control and oversee the use of Hubbard's works and Scientology's trademarks and copyrights. The RTC is the central organization within Scientology's complex corporate hierarchy and has put much effort into re-checking the accuracy of all Scientology publications to "ensur[e] the availability of the pure unadulterated writings of Mr. Hubbard to the coming generations".[316]

The Danish historian of religions Mikael Rothstein describes Scientology as "a movement focused on the figure of Hubbard". He comments: "The fact that [Hubbard's] life is mythologized is as obvious as in the cases of Jesus, Muhammad or Siddartha Gotama. This is how religion works. Scientology, however, rejects this analysis altogether, and goes to great lengths to defend every detail of Hubbard's amazing and fantastic life as plain historical fact." Hubbard is presented as "the master of a multitude of disciplines" who performed extraordinary feats as a photographer, composer, scientist, therapist, explorer, navigator, philosopher, poet, artist, humanitarian, adventurer, soldier, scout, musician and many other fields of endeavor.[16] The Church of Scientology portrays Hubbard's life and work as having proceeded seamlessly, "as if they were a continuous set of predetermined events and discoveries that unfolded through his lifelong research" even up to and beyond his death.[317]
According to Rothstein's assessment of Hubbard's legacy, Scientology consciously aims to transfer the charismatic authority of Hubbard to institutionalize his authority over the organization, even after his death. Hubbard is presented as a virtually superhuman religious ideal just as Scientology itself is presented as the most important development in human history.[318] As Rothstein puts it, "reverence for Scientology's scripture is reverence for Hubbard, the man who in the Scientological perspective single-handedly brought salvation to all human beings."[16] David G. Bromley of the University of Virginia comments that the real Hubbard has been transformed into a "prophetic persona", "LRH", which acts as the basis for his prophetic authority within Scientology and transcends his biographical history.[317]According to Dorthe Refslund Christensen, Hubbard's hagiography directly compares him with Buddha. Hubbard is viewed as having made Eastern traditions more accessible by approaching them with a scientific attitude. "Hubbard is seen as the ultimate-cross-cultural savior; he is thought to be able to release man from his miserable condition because he had the necessary background, and especially the right attitude."[319]
Hubbard, although increasingly deified after his death, is the model Operating Thetan to Scientologists and their founder, and not God. Hubbard then is the "Source", "inviting others to follow his path in ways comparable to a Bodhisattva figure" according to religious scholar Donald A. Westbrook. Scientologists refer to L. Ron Hubbard as "Ron", referring to him as a personal friend.[320]

 Biographies of l Ron Hubbard
In the late 1970s two men began to assemble a picture of Hubbard's life. Michael Linn Shannon, a resident of Portland, Oregon, became interested in Hubbard's life story after an encounter with a Scientology recruiter. Over the next four years he collected previously undisclosed records and documents. He intended to write an exposé of Hubbard and sent a copy of his findings and key records to a number of contacts but was unable to find a publisher.[321]
Shannon's findings were acquired by Gerry Armstrong, a Scientologist who had been appointed Hubbard's official archivist.[321] He had been given the job of assembling documents relating to Hubbard's life for the purpose of helping Omar V. Garrison, a non-Scientologist who had written two books sympathetic to Scientology, to write an official biography. However, the documents that he uncovered convinced both Armstrong and Garrison that Hubbard had systematically misrepresented his life. Garrison refused to write a "puff piece" and declared that he would not "repeat all the falsehoods they [the Church of Scientology] had perpetuated over the years". He wrote a "warts and all" biography while Armstrong quit Scientology, taking five boxes of papers with him. The Church of Scientology and Mary Sue Hubbard sued for the return of the documents while settling out of court with Garrison, requiring him to turn over the nearly completed manuscript of the biography.[322] In October 1984 Judge Paul G. Breckenridge ruled in Armstrong's favor, saying:
The evidence portrays a man who has been virtually a pathological liar when it comes to his history, background and achievements. The writings and documents in evidence additionally reflect his egoism, greed, avarice, lust for power, and vindictiveness and aggressiveness against persons perceived by him to be disloyal or hostile. At the same time it appears that he is charismatic and highly capable of motivating, organizing, controlling, manipulating and inspiring his adherents. He has been referred to during the trial as a "genius," a "revered person," a man who was "viewed by his followers in awe." Obviously, he is and has been a very complex person and that complexity is further reflected in his alter ego, the Church of Scientology.[323]
In November 1987, the British journalist and writer Russell Miller published Bare-faced Messiah, the first full-length biography of L. Ron Hubbard. He drew on Armstrong's papers, official records and interviews with those who had known Hubbard including ex-Scientologists and family members. The book was well-received by reviewers but the Church of Scientology sought unsuccessfully to prohibit its publication on the grounds of copyright infringement.[324]Other critical biographical accounts are found in Bent Corydon's L. Ron Hubbard, Messiah or Madman? (1987) and Jon Atack's A Piece of Blue Sky (1990).

Scientific Biographies of l Ron Hubbard

Hagiographical accounts published by the Church of Scientology describe Hubbard as "a child prodigy of sorts" who rode a horse before he could walk and was able to read and write by the age of four.[325] A Scientology profile says that he was brought up on his grandfather's "large cattle ranch in Montana"[326] where he spent his days "riding, breaking broncos, hunting coyote and taking his first steps as an explorer".[83] His grandfather is described as a "wealthy Western cattleman" from whom Hubbard "inherited his fortune and family interests in America, Southern Africa, etc."[327] Scientology claims that Hubbard became a "blood brother" of the Native American Blackfeet tribe at the age of six through his friendship with a Blackfeet medicine man.[20][328]

However, contemporary records show that his grandfather, Lafayette Waterbury, was a veterinarian, not a rancher, and was not wealthy. Hubbard was actually raised in a townhouse in the center of Helena.[329] According to his aunt, his family did not own a ranch but did own one cow and four or five horses on a few acres of land outside the city.[83] Hubbard lived over a hundred miles from the Blackfeet reservation. While some sources support Scientology's claim of Hubbard's blood brotherhood, other sources say that the tribe did not practice blood brotherhood and no evidence has been found that he had ever been a Blackfeet blood brother.[330][331][332][333]

According to Scientology biographies, during a journey to Washington, D.C. in 1923 Hubbard learned of Freudian psychology from Commander Joseph "Snake" Thompson, a U.S. Navy psychoanalyst and medic.[22][334] Scientology biographies describe this encounter as giving Hubbard training in a particular scientific approach to the mind, which he found unsatisfying.[335] In his diary, Hubbard claimed he was the youngest Eagle Scout in the U.S.[336]

Scientology texts present Hubbard's travels in Asia as a time when he was intensely curious for answers to human suffering and explored ancient Eastern philosophies for answers, but found them lacking.[337] He is described as traveling to China "at a time when few Westerners could enter"[307] and according to Scientology, spent his time questioning Buddhist lamas and meeting old Chinese magicians.[337] According to church materials, his travels were funded by his "wealthy grandfather".[338]

Scientology accounts say that Hubbard "made his way deep into Manchuria's Western Hills and beyond — to break bread with Mongolian bandits, share campfires with Siberian shamans and befriend the last in the line of magicians from the court of Kublai Khan".[339] However, Hubbard did not record these events in his diary.[340] He remained unimpressed with China and the Chinese, writing: "A Chinaman can not live up to a thing, he always drags it down." He characterized the sights of Beijing as "rubberneck stations" for tourists and described the palaces of the Forbidden City as "very trashy-looking" and "not worth mentioning". He was impressed by the Great Wall of China near Beijing,[341] but concluded of the Chinese: "They smell of all the baths they didn't take. The trouble with China is, there are too many chinks here."[342]
Despite not graduating from George Washington, Hubbard claimed "to be not only a graduate engineer, but 'a member of the first United States course in formal education in what is called today nuclear physics.'"[343] However, a Church of Scientology biography describes him as "never noted for being in class" and says that he "thoroughly detest[ed] his subjects".[66] He earned poor grades, was placed on probation in September 1931 and dropped out altogether in the fall of 1932.[343][344]
Scientology accounts say that he "studied nuclear physics at George Washington University in Washington, D.C., before he started his studies about the mind, spirit and life"[345] and Hubbard himself stated that he "set out to find out from nuclear physics a knowledge of the physical universe, something entirely lacking in Asian philosophy".[66] His university records indicate that his exposure to "nuclear physics" consisted of one class in "atomic and molecular phenomena" for which he earned an "F" grade.[346]
Scientologists claim he was more interested in extracurricular activities, particularly writing and flying. According to church materials, "he earned his wings as a pioneering barnstormer at the dawn of American aviation"[328] and was "recognized as one of the country's most outstanding pilots. With virtually no training time, he takes up powered flight and barnstorms throughout the Midwest."[347] His airman certificate, however, records that he qualified to fly only gliders rather than powered aircraft and gave up his certificate when he could not afford the renewal fee.[51]
 Bibliography
Main article: L. Ron Hubbard bibliography
See also: Bibliography of Scientology and Written works of L. Ron Hubbard
According to the Church of Scientology, Hubbard produced some 65 million words on Dianetics and Scientology, contained in about 500,000 pages of written material, 3,000 recorded lectures and 100 films. His works of fiction included some 500 novels and short stories.[302]

See Also
Norton S. Karno, an attorney for the Church of Scientology and for L. Ron Hubbard
Notes
 Church of Scientology International. L. Ron Hubbard: A Profile. Retrieved November 26, 2012.
^ "new religious movement (NRM)". Retrieved July 25, 2016.
^ Editors, History com. "L. Ron Hubbard publishes Dianetics". HISTORY.
^ Frail, T.A. "Meet the 100 Most Significant Americans of All Time". Retrieved November 23, 2015.
^ Sappel, Joel; Welkos, Robert W. (June 24, 1990). "The Mind Behind the Religion, Chapter 2: Creating the Mystique: Hubbard's Image Was Crafted of Truth, Distorted by Myth". Los Angeles Times. Archived from the original on June 12, 2008. Retrieved July 14, 2009.
^ "The Mind Behind the Religon(sic) - Los Angeles Times". June 12, 2008. Archived from the original on June 12, 2008. Retrieved July 25, 2016.
^ Miller, chapter 6
^ Stark and Bainbridge 1996, p. 213.

Dawson 2006, p. 38: "Members of the paramilitary Sea Org sign billion-year contracts of absolute loyalty and service to the highest leadership of the Church of Scientology."
Former member Aaron Judge in Squires, 29 November 2009: "The Sea Org is like a military organization. You live in cramped quarters, are served food in the cafeteria area and you basically work from 8:30 in the morning through to 11:15 at night."
Former Scientology auditor Bruce Hines in Cooper, 2 December 2005: "It's very much a military organization. You wear a uniform, there's saluting, marching, standing at attention."

^ Russell Miller (November 15, 1987). "Farce and fear in Scientology's private navy [extract from "Bare-Faced Messiah: The True Story of L. Ron Hubbard"]"(PDF). The Sunday Times. Retrieved July 8, 2013.
^ Urban 2011, pp. 124–127.
^ Miller, Russell. "Bare-faced Messiah". Michael Joseph. Archived from the original on July 3, 2012. Retrieved April 25, 2016.
^ Reitman, Janet; American Society of Magazine Editors (2007). "Inside Scientology". The Best American Magazine Writing 2007. Columbia University Press. p. 323. ISBN 9780231143912.
^ Reitman, Janet (2007). "Inside Scientology". The Best American Magazine Writing 2007. Columbia University Press. ISBN 9780231143912.
^ Christensen, p. 228
^ Jump up to:a b Urban, Hugh B. "Fair Game: Secrecy, Security, and the Church of Scientology in Cold War America." Journal of the American Academy of Religion 74:2 (2006)
^ Jump up to:a b c Rothstein, p. 21.
^ Jump up to:a b c d e f g Wright, Lawrence (February 14, 2011)."The Apostate: Paul Haggis vs. the Church of Scientology." The New Yorker, retrieved February 8, 2011.
^ Hall, Timothy L. American religious leaders, p. 175. New York: Infobase Publishing, 2003. ISBN 978-0-8160-4534-1
^ Miller, Russell. Bare-faced Messiah: the true story of L. Ron Hubbard, p. 11. London: Joseph, 1987. ISBN 0-7181-2764-1, OCLC 17481843
^ Jump up to:a b c Christensen, pp. 236–237
^ Miller, p. 19
^ Jump up to:a b Miller, p. 23
^ Jump up to:a b Miller, p. 27
^ Jump up to:a b Miller, p. 28
^ Atack, p. 54
^ Miller, p. 31
^ Lewis, James R. (2009). Scientology. USA: Oxford University Press.
^ Clarke, Peter, Ed. (2004). Encyclopedia of New Religious Movements. Routledge. p. 281. ISBN 9781134499700.
^ Miller, p. 34
^ Miller, p. 41
^ Miller, p. 44
^ "Understanding Scientology / Chapter 2: L. Ron Hubbard -- Messiah? Or Madman?". Retrieved July 25, 2016.
^ Miller, p. 45
^ Miller, p. 46
^ Jump up to:a b Miller, p. 47
^ Atack, p. 59
^ Jump up to:a b "Bare-Faced Messiah: Chapter 3". www.cs.cmu.edu.
^ "New government release contains a surprise: L. Ron Hubbard flunked out of high school, too! - Scientology News - The Underground Bunker". tonyortega.org.
^ Miller, p. 52
^ Miller, p. 54
^ Miller, p. 55
^ Jump up to:a b Atack, p. 63
^ Jump up to:a b Miller, p. 56
^ Nicholls, Peter. Encyclopedia of Science Fiction, 1978, p.108, ISBN 0-586-05380-8
^ Jump up to:a b "Bare-Faced Messiah: Chapter 4". www.cs.cmu.edu.
^ "A Piece Of Blue Sky - Part 2, Chapter 6: His Magickal Career". www.instinct.org.
^ Miller, p. 61
^ Miller, p. 64
^ Miller, p. 70
^ Miller, p. 62
^ Jump up to:a b Atack, p. 64
^ Miller, p. 63
^ "About L. Ron Hubbard — Master Storyteller." Galaxy Press, 2010, retrieved February 8, 2011.
^ Miller, p. 72
^ Frenschkowski, Marco (July 1999). "L. Ron Hubbard and Scientology: An annotated bibliographical survey of primary and selected secondary literature" (PDF). Marburg Journal of Religion:. 4 (1): 15. Retrieved May 13,2015.
^ Jump up to:a b c Asimov, Isaac. In Memory Yet Green: The Autobiography of Isaac Asimov, 1920–1954, p. 413. New York: Doubleday, 1979. ISBN 978-0-385-13679-2
^ Miller, p. 74
^ Staff (July 30, 1937). "Books Published Today". The New York Times. The New York Times Company. p. 17.
^ Jump up to:a b Stableford, Brian. Historical dictionary of science fiction literature, p. 164. Lanham, MD: Scarecrow Press, 2004. ISBN 978-0-8108-4938-9
^ Miller, p. 86
^ "L. Ron Hubbard Facts, information, pictures - Encyclopedia.com articles about L. Ron Hubbard". Retrieved July 25, 2016.
^ Harmon, Jim; Donald F. Glut. The Great Movie Serials: Their Sound and Fury, p. 329. London: Routledge, 1973. ISBN 978-0-7130-0097-9
^ Miller, p. 71
^ Miller, p. 75
^ Miller, p. 84
^ Jump up to:a b c d "A Brief Biography of L. Ron Hubbard," Ability, Church of Scientology Washington, D.C. Issue 111, January 1959.
^ "L. Ron Hubbard Biographical Profile — Founder." Church of Scientology International, 2010, retrieved February 17, 2011.
^ Gardner, p. 272
^ Jump up to:a b c Atack, p. 66
^ Malko, p. 40
^ Jump up to:a b Burks, Arthur J (December 1961). "Excalibur." The Aberree.
^ Miller, p. 80
^ Ackerman, Forrest J (November 19, 1997) Secret Lives: L. Ron Hubbard, Channel 4 Television.
^ Jump up to:a b Letter from L. Ron Hubbard, October 1938, quoted in Miller, p. 81
^ Quoted in Malko, p. 39
^ Jump up to:a b Miller, p. 85
^ Miller, p. 88
^ Jump up to:a b Miller, p. 89
^ Atack, p. 68
^ Jump up to:a b Miller, p. 91
^ Miller, p. 93
^ Jump up to:a b c d e f "Bare-Faced Messiah: Chapter 6". www.cs.cmu.edu.
^ Jump up to:a b c d e f g Sappell, Joel; Welkos, Robert (June 24, 1990). "The Making of L. Ron Hubbard: Creating the Mystique." Los Angeles Times, p. A38:1
^ Miller, p. 107
^ Jump up to:a b Wright, p. 53
^ Atack, p. 81; Streeter, p. 208
^ "Bare-Faced Messiah: Chapter 7". www.cs.cmu.edu.
^ Atack, p. 84
^ Jump up to:a b Stafford, Charles L.; Orsini, Bette (January 9, 1980). "Church moves to defend itself against 'attackers". St. Petersburg Times.
^ Hubbard, L. Ron. "My Philosophy," Church of Scientology International, 1965, retrieved February 17, 2011.
^ Miller, p. 125
^ Miller, p. 113
^ Miller, p. 114
^ Miller, p. 117
^ Quoted in Symonds, John. The Great Beast: the life and magick of Aleister Crowley, p. 392. London: Macdonald and Co., 1971. ISBN 0-356-03631-6
^ Stoddard Martin (1989). Orthodox Heresy: The Rise of 'magic' As Religion and Its Relation to Literature. Macmillan Press. p. 195. ISBN 978-0-333-43540-3.
^ Jump up to:a b Urban, Hugh B. Magia sexualis: sex, magic, and liberation in modern Western esotericism, p. 137. Berkeley, CA: University of California Press, 2006. ISBN 978-0-520-24776-5
^ Metzger, Richard. Book of Lies: The Disinformation Guide to Magick and the Occult, p. 200. New York: The Disinformation Company, 2008. ISBN 978-0-9713942-7-8
^ Pendle, p. 268
^ Pendle, p. 269
^ Pendle, p. 270
^ De Camp, L. Sprague, letter of August 26, 1946. Quoted by Pendle, p. 271
^ Jump up to:a b Miller, p. 134
^ Reitman, p. 20
^ Wright, p. 53-4
^ Miller, p. 132
^ Streeter, p. 210
^ Video on YouTube
^ Hubbard, L. Ron, letter to Veterans Administration, October 15, 1947; quoted in Miller, p. 137
^ Miller, p. 139
^ Miller, p. 142
^ "Bare-Faced Messiah: Chapter 8". www.cs.cmu.edu.
^ "Article: Today's Terrorism – Decoding Scientology Propaganda". carolineletkeman.org.
^ Miller, p. 143
^ Miller, p. 144
^ Melton, J. Gordon (2000). The Church of Scientology. Signature Books.
^ One such letter can be found on the Church of Scientology's official L. Ron Hubbard website. See "Letters from the Birth of Dianetics," Church of Scientology International, 2004, retrieved February 8, 2011.
^ Luckhurst, Roger. Science Fiction, p. 74. Malden, MA: Polity, 2005. ISBN 978-0-7456-2893-6
^ Miller, p. 149
^ Atack, p. 106
^ Miller, p. 150
^ Streeter, pp. 210–211
^ Atack, p. 108
^ Miller, Timothy (1995). America's Alternative Religions. Albany: State University of New York Press. pp. 385–386. ISBN 978-0-7914-2398-1. OCLC 30476551.
^ Winter, p. 18
^ Quoted in Miller, p. 145
^ Miller, p. 152
^ "The TIME Vault: December 22, 1952". Retrieved July 25, 2016.
^ Atack, p. 107
^ "L. Ron Hubbard". Retrieved December 18, 2015.
^ Gardner, p. 265
^ Jump up to:a b Staff (August 21, 1950). "Dianetics book review; Best Seller." Newsweek
^ Maisel, Albert (December 5, 1950). "Dianetics — Science or Hoax?" Lookmagazine, p. 79
^ Rabi, Isaac Isador. "Book Review." Scientific American, January 1951
^ Gumpert, Martin. (August 14, 1950) "Dianetics: book review by Martin Gumpert." The New Republic
^ Miller, p. 153
^ Jump up to:a b Atack, p. 113
^ Kerman, Cynthia Earl; Eldridge, Richard. The lives of Jean Toomer: a hunger for wholeness, pp. 317–318. Baton Rouge: Louisiana State University Press, 1989. ISBN 978-0-8071-1548-0
^ Sturgeon, Theodore; Williams, Paul. Baby is three, p. 414. Berkeley, CA: North Atlantic Books, 1999. ISBN 978-1-55643-319-1
^ Jump up to:a b c Miller, p. 166
^ Melton, p. 190
^ Jump up to:a b O'Brien, p. 27
^ Miller, pp. 159–160
^ Atack, p. 377
^ Evans, p. 26
^ Winter, p. 34
^ Miller, p. 169
^ Whitehead, p. 67
^ Gardner, p. 270
^ Stark, Rodney; Bainbridge, William Sims. The future of religion: secularization, revival, and cult formation, pp. 268–269. Berkeley: University of California Press, 1986. ISBN 978-0-520-05731-9
^ Jump up to:a b c Marshall, Gordon. In praise of sociology, p. 186. London: Routledge, 1990. ISBN 978-0-04-445688-9
^ Miller, p. 173
^ Jump up to:a b Miller, p. 181
^ Jump up to:a b Miller, p. 170
^ Miller, p. 180
^ Jump up to:a b Methvin, Eugene H. (May 1990). "Scientology: Anatomy of a Frightening Cult." Reader's Digest. pp. 16.
^ Atack, p. 117
^ Martin, Walter Ralston; Zacharias, Ravi K. (ed.). The Kingdom of the Cults, p. 338. Minneapolis: Bethany House, 2003. ISBN 978-0-7642-2821-6
^ Staff (April 24, 1951). "Ron Hubbard Insane, Says His Wife." San Francisco Chronicle
^ Quoted in Miller, p. 192
^ Jump up to:a b c d Streissguth, p. 71
^ Miller, p. 200
^ Atack, p. 129
^ Mccall, W. Vaughn (2007). "Psychiatry and Psychology in the Writings of L. Ron Hubbard". Journal of Religion and Health. 46 (3): 437–47. doi:10.1007/s10943-006-9079-9.
^ "L. Ron Hubbard: A Chronicle, 1950–1959. Church of Scientology International, 2007, retrieved February 8, 2011.
^ Jump up to:a b Miller, p. 203
^ Underdown, James (2018). "'I Was There...': Harlan Ellison Witnesses the Birth of Scientology". Skeptical Inquirer. 42 (6): 10.
^ Jump up to:a b DeChant, Dell; Danny L. Jorgensen. "The Church of Scientology: A Very New American Religion" in Neusner, Jacob. World Religions in America: An Introduction, p. 226. Westminster John Knox Press, 2003. ISBN 0-664-22475-X
^ Bromley, p. 91
^ Ortega, Tony (September 15, 2011). "Hugh Urban: An Interview With the Professor Who Took on Scientology". The Village Voice. villagevoice.com. Retrieved April 19, 2016.
^ Muldoon, Sylvan (1951). The Phenomena of Astral Projection. Amazon: Rider. ASIN B0000CHX60.
^ Urban, Hugh (2012). Scientology A History of a New Religion. Google Books: Princeton University Press. p. 77. ISBN 9781400839438.
^ Jump up to:a b Miller, p. 204
^ Miller, p. 206
^ Tucker, p. 304
^ Miller, p. 210
^ Miller, p. 207
^ Miller, p. 232
^ O'Brien, p. 49
^ Miller, p. 208
^ Jump up to:a b Smith, Graham (August 7, 2009). "Scientology founder L. Ron Hubbard exposed as a 'fraud' by British diplomats 30 years ago." Daily Mail, retrieved February 8, 2011.
^ Miller, p. 212
^ Jump up to:a b Kent, Stephen A. "The Creation of 'Religious' Scientology." Religious Studies and Theology 18:2, pp. 97–126. 1999. ISSN 1747-5414
^ Streeter, p. 215; Miller, p. 213
^ "Letter: Hubbard to Helen O'Brien – Decoding Scientology Propaganda". carolineletkeman.org.
^ Jump up to:a b Miller, p. 214
^ O'Brien, p. vii
^ Lawrence, Sara. (April 18, 2006) "The Secrets of Scientology" The Independent. Retrieved February 17, 2011.
^ Staff. (April 5, 1976). "Religion: A Sci-Fi Faith." Time. Retrieved February 17, 2011.
^ Melton, J. Gordon (2000). Studies in Contemporary Religion: The Church of Scientology (1 ed.). Torino, Italy: Elle Di Ci, Leumann. pp. 55, 74. ISBN 978-1-56085-139-4. The actual quote seems to have come from a cynical remark in a letter written by Orwell published in The Collected Essays, Journalism, and Letters of George Orwell.
^ Jump up to:a b Williams, Ian. The Alms Trade: Charities, Past, Present and Future, p. 127. New York: Cosimo, 2007. ISBN 978-1-60206-753-0
^ Voltz, Tom. Scientology und (k)ein Ende, p. 75. Solothurn: Walter, 1995. ISBN 978-3-530-89980-1
^ Atack, p. 137
^ Staff (April 1954). "Three Churches Are Given Charters in New Jersey." The Aberree, volume 1, issue 1, p. 4
^ Jump up to:a b Miller, p. 239
^ Hubbard, L. Ron. "The Scientologist: A Manual on the Dissemination of Material," 1955. Quoted in Atack, p. 139
^ Atack, p. 138
^ Atack, p. 139
^ Jump up to:a b Streissguth, p. 74
^ Staff (Hubbard?) (November 1957). Ability, Issue 58, p. 5.
^ Jump up to:a b Atack, p. 142
^ Miller, p. 227
^ Miller, p. 221
^ Miller, p. 230
^ Jump up to:a b c Flag Information Letter 67, "L.R.H. Biography." Sea Organization, October 31, 1977.
^ Hubbard, L. Ron. "Constitutional Destruction." June 9, 1969, retrieved February 8, 2011.
^ Atack, p. 150
^ Hubbard, L. Ron. "Sec Check Whole Track," HCO Bulletin of June 19, 1961; quoted in Atack, p. 152
^ Hubbard, L. Ron. "Department of Government Affairs," HCO Policy Letter of August 15, 1960; quoted in Miller, p. 241
^ Fooner, Michael. Interpol: issues in world crime and international criminal justice, p. 13. New York: Plenum Press, 1989. ISBN 978-0-306-43135-7
^ Miller, p. 228
^ Atack, p. 154
^ Wallis, p. 192
^ Jump up to:a b Wallis, p. 215
^ Miller, p. 250
^ Miller, pp. 252–253
^ Wallis, p. 193
^ Jump up to:a b Wallis, p. 196
^ Reitman (2011), pp. 80–81
^ Atack, p. 183
^ Atack, p. 155
^ "What is disconnection?". Retrieved December 17, 2015.
^ Atack, p. 156
^ Hubbard, L. Ron. "Penalties for Lower Conditions." HCO Policy Letter of October 18, 1967, Issue IV. Quoted in Atack, pp. 175–176
^ Wallis, pp. 144–145
^ Atack, p. 161
^ Atack, p. 165
^ Atack, p. 189
^ Atack, p. 160
^ Miller, p. 264
^ Miller, p. 265
^ Miller, p. 269
^ Miller, p. 272
^ Quoted in Miller, p. 297
^ Miller, p. 299
^ Miller, p. 300
^ Jump up to:a b Miller, p. 290
^ Miller, p. 310
^ Miller, p. 295
^ Miller, p. 296
^ Miller, p. 311
^ Miller, p. 312
^ Jump up to:a b Hubbard, L. Ron. Mission into Time, p. 7. Copenhagen: AOSH DK Publications Department A/S, 1973. ISBN 87-87347-56-3
^ Atack, p. 159
^ Hubbard, L. Ron. "Ron's Journal '67," quoted in Atack, p. 173.
^ Atack, p. 32
^ Atack, p. 173
^ Jump up to:a b c Atack, p. 177
^ Miller, p. 285
^ Miller, p. 286
^ Atack, p. 180
^ Atack, p. 186
^ Miller, p. 289
^ Miller, p. 301
^ Sappell, Joel; Welkos, Robert (June 24, 1990). "The Mind Behind the Religion : Life With L. Ron Hubbard." Los Angeles Times, retrieved February 20, 2011.
^ Miller, p. 236
^ Miller, p. 325
^ Corydon, Bent. L. Ron Hubbard: Messiah or Madman?, p. 94. Fort Lee, N.J.: Barricade Books, 1992. ISBN 978-0-942637-57-1
^ Miller, p. 314
^ Miller, p. 318
^ Jump up to:a b "L. Ron Hubbard: A Chronicle, 1970–1979." Church of Scientology International, 2007, retrieved February 8, 2011.
^ Miller, p. 316
^ Atack, p. 255
^ Atack, p. 256
^ Atack, p. 206
^ Jump up to:a b Atack, p. 204
^ Atack, p. 209
^ Jump up to:a b Miller, p. 334
^ Miller, p. 336
^ Miller, p. 338
^ Miller, p. 340
^ Miller, p. 343
^ Miller, p. 344
^ Sappell, Joel; Robert W. Welkos (June 24, 1990). "The Mind Behind the Religion : Life With L. Ron Hubbard : Aides indulged his eccentricities and egotism". Los Angeles Times. Retrieved February 19, 2011.
^ Beresford, David (February 7, 1980). "Snow White's dirty tricks." London: The Guardian
^ Miller, pp. 317–318
^ Marshall, John (January 24, 1980). "The Scientology Papers: Hubbard still gave orders, records show." Toronto: Globe and Mail
^ Streissguth, p. 75
^ Jump up to:a b Reitman (2007), p. 323
^ Marshall, John (January 26, 1980). "The Scientology Papers: The hidden Hubbard." Toronto: Globe and Mail
^ Atack, p. 258
^ Atack, p. 259
^ Miller, p. 364
^ Jump up to:a b c Sappell, Joel; Welkos, Robert W. (June 24, 1990). The Mind Behind the Religion : Chapter Four : The Final Days : Deep in hiding, Hubbard kept tight grip on the church." Los Angeles Times, retrieved February 8, 2011.
^ Queen, Edward L.; Prothero, Stephen R.; Shattuck, Gardiner H. Encyclopedia of American religious history, Volume 1, p. 493. New York: Infobase Publishing, 2009. ISBN 978-0-8160-6660-5
^ Walker, Jeff. The Ayn Rand Cult, p. 275. Chicago: Open Court, 1999. ISBN 978-0-8126-9390-4
^ Garchik, Leah (March 17, 2006). "Leah Garchik (Daily Datebook)". San Francisco Chronicle. The Chronicle Publishing Co. p. E16.
^ Goldstein, Patrick (September 21, 1986). "Hubbard Hymns". Los Angeles Times. p. 40.
^ Miller, p. 366
^ Brown, Mark (January 30, 1986). "Creston provided quiet retreat for controversial church leader." The County Telegram-Tribune, San Luis Obispo, pp. 1A/5A.
^ Behar, Richard (October 27, 1986). "The prophet and profits of Scientology." Forbes 400 (Forbes)
^ Church of Scientology. L. Ron Hubbard's death. Image of Death Certificate. Retrieved on: June 15, 2012.
^ Miller, p. 375
^ Petrowsky, Marc. Sects, cults, and spiritual communities: a sociological analysis, p. 144. Westport, Conn.: Praeger, 1998. ISBN 978-0-275-95860-2
^ Atack, p. 354
^ [Staff] (February 7, 1986). "Hubbard Left Most of Estate to Scientology Church; Executor Appointed." The Associated Press
^ Jump up to:a b Atack, p. 356
^ Lamont, p. 154
^ Miller, p. 306
^ Lattin, Don (February 12, 2001). "Scientology Founder's Family Life Far From What He Preached." San Francisco Chronicle, retrieved February 12, 2011.
^ Jump up to:a b Reitman (2007), p. 324
^ Jump up to:a b Gallagher, Eugene V.; Ashcraft, Michael. African Diaspora Traditions and Other American Innovations, p. 172; vol 5 of Introduction to New and Alternative Religions in America. Westport, Conn.: Greenwood Publishing Group, 2006. ISBN 978-0-275-98717-6
^ "Google Map".
^ "Most published works by one author". GuinnessWorldRecords.com. Guinness World Records. Archived from the original on July 11, 2011. Retrieved February 12, 2011.
^ "Most translated author, same book". GuinnessWorldRecords.com. Guinness World Records. Archived from the original on July 11, 2011. Retrieved February 22, 2011.
^ "Most audio books published for one author". GuinnessWorldRecords.com. Guinness World Records. Archived from the original on July 11, 2011. Retrieved February 22, 2011.
^ Jump up to:a b "About the Author," in Hubbard, L. Ron: Battlefield Earth. (No page number given.) Los Angeles: Galaxy Press, 2005. ISBN 978-1-59212-007-9
^ Jump up to:a b Sappell, Joel; Welkos, Robert W. (June 28, 1990). "Costly Strategy Continues to Turn Out BestsellersArchived February 6, 2008, at the Wayback Machine." Los Angeles Times, retrieved February 15, 2011.
^ Bainbridge, William Sims. "Science and Religion: The Case of Scientology," in Bromley, David G.; Hammond, Phillip E. (eds). The Future of new religious movements, p. 63. Macon, GA: Mercer University Press, 1987. ISBN 978-0-86554-238-9
^ Times, Los Angeles. "How Scientology got L.A. to name street after L. Ron Hubbard". Retrieved July 25, 2016.
^ Tribune, Pamela Manson The Salt Lake. "West Valley City recognizes L. Ron Hubbard Day". Retrieved July 25,2016.
^ "N.J. approves more than 100 school religious holidays". Retrieved July 25,2016.
^ "N.J. Now Has More Than 100 School Religious Holidays You May Not Know About". Retrieved July 25, 2016.
^ Jarvik, Elaine (September 20, 2004). "Scientology: Church now claims more than 8 million members". Deseret Morning News. Archived from the original on June 16, 2008. Retrieved February 13, 2011.
^ Associated Press. "Defections, court fights test Scientology." MSNBC.com, November 1, 2009, retrieved February 14, 2011
^ Jump up to:a b Rothstein, p. 24
^ Jump up to:a b Bromley, p. 89

References

Atack, Jon. A Piece of Blue Sky: Scientology, Dianetics, and L. Ron Hubbard exposed. Carol Publishing Group, 1990. ISBN 978-0-8184-0499-3, OCLC 20934706
Behar, Richard Pushing Beyond the U.S.: Scientology makes its presence felt in Europe and Canada
Bromley, David G. "Making Sense of Scientology: Prophetic, Contractual Religion," in Lewis, James R. (ed.), Scientology. Oxford: Oxford University Press, 2009. ISBN 978-0-19-533149-3 OCLC 232786014
Christensen, Dorthe Refslund. "Inventing L. Ron Hubbard: On the Construction and Maintenance of the Hagiographic Mythology of Scientology's Founder," pp. 227–258 in Lewis, James R.; Petersen, Jesper Aagaard: Controversial new religions. Oxford: Oxford University Press, 2005. ISBN 978-0-19-515683-6, OCLC 53398162, available through Oxford Scholarship Online, doi:10.1093/019515682X.003.0011
Evans, Christopher. Cults of Unreason. New York: Farrar, Straus and Giroux, 1974. ISBN 0-374-13324-7, OCLC 863421
Gardner, Martin. Fads and fallacies in the name of science. New York: Courier Dover Publications, 1957. ISBN 978-0-486-20394-2, OCLC 18598918
Jacobsen, Jeff Day, Robert RJ. What the Church of Scientology Doesn't Want You To Know
Lamont, Stewart. Religion Inc.: The Church of Scientology. London: Harrap, 1986. ISBN 978-0-245-54334-0, OCLC 23079677
Malko, George. Scientology: The Now Religion. New York: Delacorte Press, 1970. OCLC 115065
Melton, J. Gordon. Encyclopedic handbook of cults in America. Taylor & Francis; 1992. ISBN 978-0-8153-1140-9
Miller, Russell. Bare-faced Messiah: the true story of L. Ron Hubbard. London: Joseph, 1987. ISBN 0-7181-2764-1, OCLC 17481843
O'Brien, Helen. Dianetics in Limbo: A Documentary About Immortality. Philadelphia: Whitmore Publishing, 1966. OCLC 4797460
Pendle, George. Strange Angel: The Otherworldly Life of Rocket Scientist John Whiteside Parsons. Orlando, FL: Houghton Mifflin Harcourt, 2006. ISBN 978-0-15-603179-0, OCLC 55149255
Reitman, Janet. "Inside Scientology," pp. 305–348 of American Society of Magazine Editors (Ed.) The Best American Magazine Writing 2007. New York: Columbia University Press, 2007. ISBN 978-0-231-14391-2, OCLC 154711228
Reitman, Janet. Inside Scientology: The Story of America's Most Secretive Religion. Boston, MA: Houghton Mifflin Harcourt, 2011. ISBN 978-0-618-88302-8, OCLC 651912263
Rolph, Cecil Hewitt Believe What You Like: what happened between the Scientologists and the National Association for Mental Health. London: Deutsch, 1973. ISBN 978-0-233-96375-4, OCLC 815558
Rothstein, Mikael. "Scientology, scripture and sacred traditions," in Lewis, James R.; Hammer, Olav (eds.): The invention of sacred tradition. Cambridge: Cambridge University Press, 2007. ISBN 978-0-521-86479-4, OCLC 154706390
Streeter, Michael. Behind closed doors: the power and influence of secret societies. London: New Holland Publishers, 2008. ISBN 978-1-84537-937-7, OCLC 231589690
Streissguth, Thomas. Charismatic cult leaders. Minneapolis: The Oliver Press, 1995. ISBN 978-1-881508-18-2, OCLC 30892074
Tucker, Ruth A. Another Gospel: Cults, Alternative Religions, and the New Age Movement. Grand Rapids, MI: Zondervan, 2004. ISBN 978-0-310-25937-4, OCLC 19354219
Wallis, Roy. The road to total freedom: a sociological analysis of Scientology. New York: Columbia University Press, 1977. ISBN 978-0-231-04200-0, OCLC 2373469
Whitehead, Harriet. Renunciation and reformulation: a study of conversion in an American sect. Ithaca, NY: Cornell University Press, 1987. ISBN 978-0-8014-1849-5, OCLC 14002616
Winter, Joseph A. A Doctor's Report on Dianetics: Theory and Therapy. New York: Julian Press, 1951. OCLC 1572759
Wright, Lawrence. Going Clear: Scientology, Hollywood, and the Prison of Belief. New York: Vintage Books, 2013. ISBN 978-0-307-74530-9

External Links

Sites run by Church of Scientology International

Official L. Ron Hubbard site
Biographical Profile of L. Ron Hubbard
L. Ron Hubbard: A Chronicle

Publishers' sites

Author Services Inc. [1] Publisher of L. Ron Hubbard's fiction
Bridge Publications Inc. [2] Publisher of L. Ron Hubbard's Scientology and Dianetics works
Writers of the Future [3] A contest founded in the early 1980s by L. Ron Hubbard to encourage upcoming fiction and fantasy writers

Further mention of Hubbard

Bare Faced Messiah by Russell Miller
Biographical documentation from The New Yorker
Operation Clambake. Critical material on Hubbard and Scientology
U.S. Government FBI Files for Hubbard via The Smoking Gun
'The Shrinking World of L. Ron Hubbard': Rare interview with Hubbard by an external documentary team on YouTube – World in Action, Granada TV, directed & produced by Charlie Nairn, 1967.
Frenschkowski, Marco, L. Ron Hubbard and Scientology: An annotated bibliographical survey of primary and selected secondary literature, Marburg Journal of Religion, Vol. 1. No. 1. July 1999, ISSN 1612-2941
L. Ron Hubbard on IMDb
L. Ron Hubbard at the Internet Speculative Fiction Database
L. Ron Hubbard at the Internet Book List
Hubbard, L Ron at the Encyclopedia of Science Fiction
Hubbard, L Ron at the Encyclopedia of Fantasy



The Scandal of Scientology (1971) By Paulette Cooper -

A chilling examination of the nature, beliefs and practices of the “now religion”.
called the American Hero ... The  Paulette Cooper Story -

 how one woman exposed Scientology and survived their attacks


http://www.apologeticsindex.org/Scandal%20of%20Scientology.pdf

CONTENTS
The Tragi-Farce of Scientology
Paperback Cover  Notes
Preface
Epigraph 1
 Introduction
From Dianetics to Scientology 
The Confessionals
Life and Sex in the Womb
Have You Lived Before This Life?
 Spreading the Word
 The Org
The Sea Org
The British and Australian Orgs
Attacking the Attackers
 The Suppressives
 The Sexual and Criminal Security Check
The World of Scientology
 Children and Celebrities
 Scientology -- Business or Religion?
Is Scientology Political?
Scientology Versus Medicine
The Secret Scientology Sessions
The E-Meter
The High Cost of Scientology
The Truth About L. Ron Hubbard
Does Scientology Work?
Conclusion Epigraph 2
Appendix: The Scientologist's Story
Bibliography of Sources Consulted
About the Author
Changes from the Paperback Edition
Index / Paperback Page Index
The Story of Paulette Cooper
Prologue
The Tragi-Farce of Scientology


This article, captioned "Paulette Cooper reports from America,"

was published in the December 1969 issue of the British magazine Queen (page 109).

 If you think you have problems with Scientology in England, you should see what's happening in the States. Here, they pass out their leaflets on the street corners of some of the most pukka neighbourhoods, urging innocent bystanders to try out Scientology. Those who have accepted the invitation have found themselves in one of their many dingy headquarters, listening to a dull lecture on Scientology, followed by a film of equal merit on its leader, L. Ron Hubbard. Those who didn't walk out then may have submitted to the American Personality Test (in England, it's the Oxford Capacity Analysis), probably not realising that the B.Scn, D.Scn, DD, and BA degrees of the girl who wrote the test stood for Bachelor of Scientology, Doctor of Scientology, and Doctor of Divinity in the "Church" of Scientology only. And who knows what that BA stood for? Maybe in her case it was legitimate, although one Scientologist in Australia admitted that her "BA" stood for "Basic Administrator" and "Book Auditor" -- the latter meaning she had bought a book on how to apply Scientology to others.

But people come to the headquarters anyway, take the test, accept the results, and sign up for Scientology. At least 150,000 people in the United States have taken that final irrevocable step, and the Scientologists claim that at least 100,000 British people are also members of the cult in England.

But it's true that we in America are to blame for starting it all. Scientology sprang like a phoenix from the dirt of "Dianetics", one of the typical crazy fads that sweeps our country periodically. Dianetics hit like a hurricane in 1950, attracting thousands of people, mostly on the West Coast, by promising to cure them of their mental and physical problems without all those tedious hours required by psycho-analysis. Dianetics even had some attraction for those people who had always secretly wanted to play doctor, because it allowed them to analyse others without all those tedious years required to train for it. But a few critics had to come along and spoil the fun. Dianetics, and its founder, L. Ron Hubbard, were discredited by the real doctors, and the country deserted Dianetics to search for Bridey Murphy (an Irish woman who believed she had been reincarnated).

But Dianetics was also quietly undergoing a rebirth, changing its name -- to Scientology -- and adding a new element -- "religion" -- which enabled it to avoid paying American income taxes. Today, this "Church of Scientology", as it is called, says it is people's "spiritual" problems that it is concerned with now.

The method, which resembles a combination of psychotherapy and the Catholic confession, is still basically the same: the Scientology "patient", or "preclear", as a newcomer is called, reveals intimate details of his past to a "reverend" in the Church of Scientology. Unfortunately, the similarities seem to end there. First, the confessional material is not kept completely confidential, since a preclear's records are available to all of his reverends, or "auditors" as they are called -- who may eventually number as many as five or six -- and unbeknown to the preclear, intimate portions of his records have sometimes been sent to the main Scientology headquarters, which are now in Saint Hill, East Grinstead, Sussex. (This can be compared to a priest's sending copies of the confession -- with names -- to the Vatican.)

Second, these auditors, some only in their teens or early twenties, who listen to problems that are often sexual, do not always maintain a proper relationship with their preclears. One male auditor wrote on a preclear's file that she was "sexy as hell", and another auditor, called Reverend Fisk, was not only sleeping with his preclear, but revealed the fact to her husband. The case would probably never have come to light except that the husband killed the Scientology reverend.

And finally, other ethical difficulties may arise because the auditors, whose medical and psychological qualifications are certainly questionable, are not always examined too carefully for their background either. One auditor here agreed to practise Scientology on a couple with three young daughters if he could move into their house with them. Later, after he disappeared, the parents learned that this Scientology auditor had tried to track down their daughters in Girl Scout camp and grammar-school, and was in trouble in another state for showing sexual interest towards very young girls.

This "confession", "therapy", or to use their word, "auditing", that Scientologists perform, is done by having the preclear hold two tin cans, which are connected to a crude galvanometer they call an "Emeter". Although a US spokesman stated that the E-meter is subject to "uncontrollable variations in skin contact and current", the preclear believes the E-meter works like a lie-detector, or a "truthdetector" as he prefers to call it, and he tells his auditor intimate details of his life -- while his auditor takes notes.

Not all of the personal information Scientologists reveal has been voluntary either, since some preclears have been made to take what Scientologists call a "security check", at which time, the preclear, while holding on to the E-meter (which, remember, he thinks works like a lie-detector), was asked by his interrogator or auditor whether he had ever been insane, a communist, a spy, or had a police record, raped anyone or been raped, had an abortion or performed one, practised cannibalism, adultery, sex with animals, exhibitionism, incest, miscegenation, pederasty, prostitution, voyeurism, masturbation etc.

The purpose of this auditing is to help a preclear get rid of his "engrams", which Scientologists believe are a type of impression imprinted on the protoplasm itself and are the root of all mental aberrations. L. Ron Hubbard, who devised these theories, believes that these "engrams" can be incurred when the person is still in the womb, and even at conception -- although he has never made it clear exactly how an engram could have been implanted before a foetus had developed a nervous system or the sense organs with which to register an impression. Scientologists simply accept his theory that if a husband beats his pregnant wife and shouts "take that" as he hits her, an engram is planted, and when Junior is born he might grow up to take this literally, and become a thief whose goal is to "take that".

 But the fathers aren't the only villains. Most of the mothers Hubbard depicted make Medea look like the Madonna. They were giving their unborn children engrams with AA -- attempted abortion (and there are so many abortions in Hubbard's case histories that it's a miracle that any of us got here at all), and when they weren't being knocked down or knocked up by their husbands, they were usually having affairs. This situation could also lead to engrams, especially if the child in the womb was ultimately to be named after the father. Hubbard believed that many of these unfaithful wives made unpleasant remarks about their husbands to their lovers during coitus, and that Junior, who was being knocked unconscious in the womb by the sex act, would hear these remarks aimed at his father and think that they applied to him, because he had been given the same name (don't ask how the child knew what his name was going to be). If it seems amazing that these engrams could hear and pun, there are even stranger cases, where they were said to misrecord as well. One auditor reported that a rash on the backside of his preclear started when the preclearwas in the womb and his mother frequently asked for an "aspirin". The engram was said to have mistakenly registered this as "ass burn".

While undergoing this auditing, or erasing of engrams, the preclear begins to hallucinate not only about life in the womb, but also about his many past lives, since Scientologists believe that we, or our "thetans" (ie "spirits") have been around in some form or another for seventy-four trillion years. One Scientologist is said to have gone into a state of grief when she realised she had been her father's lover -- before she was born. Another Scientologist "discovered" during his auditing sessions that his current headaches started when he was a Roman centurion during the Battle of Cannae in 216 BC. He believes that someone from the Roman Burial party, mistakenly believing him dead, tried to kick his helmet back on to his head.

Scientologists are relentless in their attempts to get others to share their "religious" beliefs, and while some of their proselytising is probably based on their sincere desire to spread the joy of Scientology, there's another motive they never admit to: Scientologists in America receive a ten per cent cash rebate on any money spent by a convert they've brought in. Once a potential convert does show up, he may find it very hard to escape, since Scientologists immediately register every person who comes into their headquarters, or "org" as they call it (short for organisation), and from that moment on, the potential convert will receive a relentless mountain of mail urging him to join Scientology. One actor from Greenwich Village, who went to the "org" out of curiosity, tried to make it immediately clear to the Scientologists that he did not want to receive the incessant phone calls and letters to which a Scientology friend of his had been subjected. They agreed to take this actor's name off their mailing list, but they then hounded him to reveal the name of his friend who had complained about the phone calls, so that they could "call him and talk with him about it". And oh yes, today, one year later, the actor still receives mail from Scientology.

Those who do join Scientology must take one of two series of prescribed courses. The first group, auditing, consists of several levels which enable a Scientology "preclear" to become a "clear", ie, a person who is supposedly free from ailments that range from colds to cancer, and who has an IQ of over 135, etc. While everything is expensive in America, the price of these courses is ridiculous. In order to "go clear", a preclear must take courses that begin at £311, then £208, £499, £322, £250, and finally £333! Those who wish to rise above "clear" to reach the highest Scientology level of "Operating Thetan VIII" (defined as someone who can function without the aid of their body) must pay a whopping £1,185 more.

But that's just half the story, since Scientology also trains people to become auditors. Auditors don't even need a high-school education -- just more Scientology courses. These courses generally take a couple of months, although Scientologists sometimes boast that they can train some people to treat others in "less than twenty minutes". Training, which is much cheaper than auditing, is used to introduce people to Scientology here, perhaps because it starts at a modest £6, £13, and £19 before suddenly leaping to their more typical rate of £541.

Scientologists get people to pay these incredible fees by promising to return money to anyone who is dissatisfied. Unfortunately, however, they have occasionally set up certain conditions that have made this difficult. One Australian woman signed up for 300 hours of Scientology but decided soon afterwards that it was aggravating rather than alleviating her problems. When she tried to get her money back, however, she claims they wrote her that she would have to take and pay for all 300 hours before she could ask for a refund.

Scientology is so expensive that most Scientologists leave their jobs and go to work for the org, sometimes for no pay but just training units, sometimes at a salary that is less than a quarter of what they would receive on a regular job in the States. Some Scientologists choose credit instead, and unpaid notes have been turned over to collection agencies, legal action has been threatened, and people have been harassed and intimidated, like the American father who received the following letter when he protested a £145 bill for fifteen hours of audition for his son.

 "... I am expert at harassment, try me and find out ... one more word out of you and I'll have you investigated ... I'll just start my people to work on you and before long, you will be broke, and out of a job, and broken in health ... you won't take long to finish off. I would estimate 3 weeks. Remember: I am not a mealy mouthed psalm canting preacher. I am a minister of the Church of Scientology! I am able to heal the sick and I do. But I have other abilities which include a knowledge of men's minds that I will use to crush you to your knees. You or any."

The letter, signed by a Reverend Andrew Bagley, Organisation Secretary, had a short PS appended: "Don't reply to this letter. If I want to get in touch with you, I'll be able to find you. Anywhere." PS. The father paid the bill.

Scientologists repeatedly emphasise that the leader, L. Ron Hubbard, or "Ron" as the believers call him, makes no money from all this, although he receives a standard ten per cent tithe and sometimes more from the gross income of the twenty-one Scientology orgs (throughout the world) and their hundreds of franchises (a strange structure for a supposed Church!). He also makes money from books he's written on Scientology, and in America, he requires that all orgs buy more than £4,160 worth of them -- fifty per cent off for cash -- or he declares the Executive Secretary, whose job it is to purchase these books, "non-existent".

Another source of his income is a booklet called Expand, whose title unfortunately doesn't refer to any potential of the mind. Expand pushes almost £2,080 worth of films and tapes of Hubbard, certificates for marriages, funerals and christenings in the Scientology Church (which is legal in many US states), Old Father Hubbard's cupboard of E-meters (which auditors must purchase for £351 each, although they cost only £5 to build), and pictures of Hubbard himself for only £2 10s apiece.

Perhaps Hubbard's imagination as a businessman stems from his earlier days as a sciencefiction writer, who apparently took his work rather seriously, since he claimed to have visited Heaven twice, the planet Venus, and the Van Allen radiation belt. In fact, Scientology was first presented (as Dianetics) in the American Astounding Science Fiction magazines, and later expanded into a best-seller called Dianetics: The Modern Science of Mental Health.

Although many of his statements do sound as if he's from out of this world, Hubbard has stated that he does not wish to be deified by his followers. Nonetheless, he has revised the calendar to read "AD 1, AD 10" etc. ("After Dianetics, 1951," etc) and claimed that his discovery of Dianetics (ie, Scientology without the religion) was a "milestone for Man comparable to his discovery of fire and superior to his invention of the wheel and arch".

Not everyone agreed that he has made such great contributions. The New York Times, which currently accepts Scientology ads in, of all places, their Church column, reported on 24th April, 1951 that one of Hubbard's earlier wives was suing him for divorce, claiming that doctors had said he was a "paranoid schizophrenic" and that he had tortured her by "beating her, strangling her and denying her sleep".

It should also be noted that Hubbard, who often calls himself a nuclear physicist, and claims a BS from George Washington University and a PhD from Sequoia University, actually flunked physics, was placed on probation his first year at George Washington and didn't return afterwards; and Sequoia University in California, which was originally called the College of Drugless Healing, delivered mail-order doctorates. Nonetheless, Hubbard calls himself "Doctor" and he does indeed have a D.Scn -- or Doctor of Scientology.

While the Church of Scientology creed states that all men have the right "to think freely, to talk freely, to write freely their own opinions and to counter or utter or write about the opinions of others", this doesn't seem to apply to anyone who wishes to think, talk, or write against Scientology. A few of the articles and books on Scientology and Dianetics have strangely "disappeared" from the New York Public Library. Scientology offers a £4,180 reward to anyone who can give information "leading to the prosecution of those responsible for the attacks on Scientology". One writer in America tried to speak out against them on the telly. Before he went on the air, he learned that the Scientologists had found out about his plan and had called friends of his for personal information on him, "because we're going to get him".

A Scientologist is the last person in the world permitted to speak against Scientology, and if he tries, he becomes a "suppressive person" and "enemy of Scientology" and no other Scientologist is permitted to associate with him. Anyone who knows a suppressive is "reviewed" (and charged for it!) and declared a "Potential Trouble Source" or "PTS" until he "handles or disconnects" from the suppressive. If a Potential Trouble Source refuses to disconnect from someone on the suppressive list, he becomes suppressive, and one American boy was declared suppressive for failing to disconnect from his father -- although the child was only ten years old!


Another "suppressive", Raymond J. D. Buckingham, an English basso who administers a voice school in Manhattan, was initially so impressed with Scientology that he convinced several of his students and his fiancée to join. But when he discovered that his auditor was revealing personal information about him, and that the reverend who was his fiancée's auditor was trying to seduce her, he'd had it. When he went to the Scientologists to complain, however, he was told he would have to pay them £10 to discuss it and "get their advice". Totally disgusted, he had the courage to speak against Scientology on a radio programme. The Scientologists countered by declaring him a "suppressive person", "outside their protection" and "fair game". They ordered his students who had become Scientologists (at his recommendation) to disconnect from him and the money they legally owed him. He received phone calls threatening his life, and his fiancée, who was too frightened to leave Scientology, was held in a room at the org in Manhattan for four hours until she agreed to sign a statement saying that Buckingham had threatened to kill her.


The story does have a happy ending. Two, in fact. They eventually did get married and both have left Scientology.
But most stories don't have such happy endings there, because most people who join Scientology stay there. It would be foolish for them not to, because they have revealed much intimate information about themselves during their auditing and security test, and this information is kept in files which are hardly dead, since they are sometimes brought out and discussed with Scientologists if they're having some difficulties -- like perhaps they want to leave the group. In a Policy Letter of l9th April, 1965, Hubbard stated that a Scientologist who left without reporting to the leaders or letting his auditor handle the matter "must be fully investigated at any cost". In fact, Hubbard wrote the following to the secretary of the Melbourne headquarters about a boy who was giving them trouble: "H (a well-known Scientologist) blew up in our faces ... we have criminal background on him. Rape of a girl pc (preclear) in Dallas and countless others. This will do something to (another Scientologist). Now I firmly believe you will be able to find a criminal background this life on ________ and (two more Scientologists)...."

But most Scientologists stay there not because they fear investigations or blackmail but because they genuinely believe in their Church and its principles. Scientologists are perfectly contented to "disconnect" or divorce themselves from their "suppressive" spouses or parents, if necessary, remarry other Scientologists, have their own children audited, leave their jobs, and become part of the world of Scientology -- a world so different from the real one that it hits you like the heat on a hot summer day from the moment that you walk into an org. It's a world with its own morality, according to the Australian inquiry into Scientology which found that a Scientologist can seduce a fifteen-yearold girl because she's really over seventy trillion plus fifteen-years-old -- obviously past the age of consent. The Scientology world has its own language, which often makes them sound as if they're eating a metaphysical alphabet soup (PTS, Org, SP, LRH, MEST, etc).

People who become part of the Scientology world even look different, because Scientologists are trained to stare in the eyes of others in an "eye-lock", while acknowledging everything said to them verbally ("Beautiful", "Groovy") in a way that can sometimes be unnerving. Scientologists have their own system of justice, with misdemeanours, crimes, high crimes and punishments, eg being made to wear a dirty rag or a handcuff on their arm if they break the Scientology rules.

And finally, yes -- they do have church services -- if one could call them that. During one outdoor service in Manhattan's Central Park, the first speaker told how wonderful Scientology was and the second sang probably the dirtiest lyrics ever heard within a supposedly clerical setting.

Although in England Scientology is not a religion -- the Registrar General refused to register Saint Hill under the Place of Worship Registration act of 1855 -- by calling itself a Church in America, Scientology has so far been able to avoid not only taxes, but difficulties, since American laws allow a great deal of latitude toward anything that calls itself a religion. And the religion adds an air of respectability which is reinforced by the full clerical garb worn by some Scientologists (which includes a cross "bigger than the Archbishop of Canterbury", as one Londoner describes it).

But outside America, things have not been so easy for the Scientologists. In Victoria, the Lieutenant-Governor appointed a special board of inquiry to look into Scientology because of numerous complaints as to their activities. Although this inquiry had the limitations of being a oneman commission, this man was thorough enough to spend 160 days listening to four million words of 151 witnesses, and on the basis of this testimony, he concluded that Scientology was "evil", that it had "no worthwhile redeeming features" and that it was "the world's largest organization of unqualified persons engaged in the practice of dangerous techniques which masquerade as mental therapy". The Government accepted his conclusions, and a law was passed in 1965 making teaching Scientology, applying it, or even advertising it, punishable in the State of Victoria in Australia by up to £500 and two years in jail. And Scientology has also now been banned in the State of South Australia.

In England, Scientology has been making news -- and trouble -- since 1959, when Hubbard left America (because "the atmosphere was being poisoned by nuclear experiments") and bought the palatial Saint Hill Manor in East Grinstead, formerly the home of the Maharaja of Jaipur. Hubbard switched the headquarters of Scientology to England and sent his decrees by Telex from this mansion to his "orgs" in five continents.

An inquiry is currently under way to investigate Scientology in England, but in America, unlike England and Australia few people are brave enough to try to stop it. Scientology is growing rapidly throughout many major American cities and they have tripled or quadrupled their numbers in the past three years alone.


There is no doubt that Scientology has helped some of its converts, although it is certainly debatable whether it is a form of faith-healing effective on people so suggestible that they would have been helped by anything. But there is also no doubt that there are others that it has not helped. Preclears have had psychiatric treatment and/or hospitalisation after they left Scientology. Letting anauditor, without proper medical or psychological training treat the "spirit" would seem to be a dangerous practice. And letting an auditor solve problems by taking people back to former lives may lead them to believe they're doing something about their problems when in reality they could be getting worse.

There are fourteen stages of crawling before a child can actually walk; the mind too, develops in certain hierarchical steps, each of which must be stabilised somewhat before the person can safely move on. Scientologists, encouraged by auditors whose qualifications are questionable, may move on to the next step before they are ready to handle it. And like walking before they can crawl -- they may fall flat on their psychical faces.

Paperback Cover Notes
Back Cover of the Paperback Edition
Scientology -- The World of the Totally Free?


 Scientology has been called the "now religion" and claims to be one of the world's fastest growing religious sects. Just what is Scientology? What kind of people does it attract, what does it do for them, and how does it hold them? This fascinating study of a group that already exercises influence over many Americans and is growing rapidly reveals the truth about:
 • L. Ron Hubbard, Scientology's patron saint;
• the Sea Org, Scientology's lavish yacht on the Mediterranean;
• the E-meter, Scientology's lie detector;
• auditing sessions where people reveal their most intimate sexual experiences;
• the criminal security test;
 • Scientology's political ambitions and how Scientology relates to celebrities.
Is Scientology therapeutic and helpful, or does it toy dangerously with blackmail, tyranny, and hypnotism?
You must read this book before you are charmed into "the world of the totally free."


Lafayette Ronald Hubbard's Sexual Deviancy

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=CRPxI8JcFd0##Desertphile

Published on Dec 12, 2007
In a letter to the United States Veteran's Administration dated October 15th., 1947, L. Ron Hubbard begged for psychiatric treatment. He wrote in part, quote, "Toward the end of my service I avoided out of pride any mental examinations, hoping that time would balance a mind which I had every reason to suppose was seriously affected" unquote. http://holysmoke.org/theta.htm http://ronthenut.org Additional key words: testosterone, Stilbestrol, gonorrhea, sulfathiazole, prostitution, Polly Grubb, adultery, bigamy, John "Jack" Whiteside Parsons, JPL, OTO, black sex magic, Vince McGonigle, Frank Dessler, Alexis, Sara Northrup

The information in this video is supported by a massive amount on information available on the Internet including information on my website
 http://holysmoke.org

Much of it comes from L Ron Hubbard himself in his own diaries and writings … also from his family members and also from documents seized by the FBI (The United States Bureau of Investigation). In letter to the United States Veteran Administration dated October 15th, 1947 …. L. Ron Hubbard begged for pyschriatric treatment .. he wrote in part quote …  “.. toward the end of my service I avoided out of pride and mental examination … hoping that time would balance a mind, which I have every reason to suppose was seriously affected …”

He also wrote in that letter …. “… I was placed on certain medications back east and had continued it at my own expense…” .
Therein is the key to his mental distress … that ….. “..certain medication …”
Was for venerial disease .. Gonorrhea  … which he acquired from a whore names Ginger … he also thought that he got gnonarea a second time from a whore he called Fern … but that turned out to be a different disease …Hubbard was greatly distressed about his penis’s inability to become errect ….as well as his lack of sex drive …  to such an extent that he medicated himself with injections of testosterone and estrogen … estrogen  is a drug used by vetnerarians on female dogs to help the dogs control their bowl movements… it is also used as a palitive for victims of prostrate cancer … which I suspect is why Hubbard was taking it … he found the effect soothing .. he also took testosterone because  estrogen  was known to make testicals smaller .. also make male breasts enlarged and reduce male potency and femininizing effects of taking the drug …


Testosterone is a hormone produced by the human body. It's mainly produced in men by the testicles. Testosteroneaffects a man's appearance and sexual development. It stimulates sperm production as well as a man's sex drive. It also helps build muscle and bone mass.


​https://studenthealth.oregonstate.edu/sites/studenthealth.oregonstate.edu/files/information_form_for_feminizing_medication.pdf


Information on Feminizing Medications Persons in the male-to-female spectrum who desire feminization may use estrogen and/or androgen antagonists (also called “anti-androgens” or “androgen blockers”) to reduce gender dysphoria and to facilitate a more feminine gender presentation. While there are risks associated with taking feminizing medications, when appropriately prescribed they can greatly improve mental health and quality of life. Please initial the bottom of each page to indicate that you understand the benefits, risks, and changes that may occur from taking feminizing medication. If you have any questions or concerns about the information below, please talk with the people involved in your care so you can make fully informed decisions about your treatment. It is your right to seek another opinion if you want additional perspective on any aspect of your care. Feminizing Effects 

1. I understand that estrogen, androgen antagonists, or a combination of the two, reduce male physical features and feminize my body. 
2. I understand that the feminizing effects of estrogen and androgen antagonists can take several months or longer to become noticeable, and that the rate and degree of change is not predictable. 
3. I understand that if I am taking estrogen I will probably develop breasts, and:
• Breasts may take several years to develop to their full size. 
• Even if I stop estrogen, the breast tissue that has developed will remain. 
• As soon as breasts start growing, I should begin monthly breast self-exam, and to have an annual breast exam by a clinician or nurse. 
• I may develop a milky nipple discharge (galactorrhea). Estrogen use or an underlying medical condition can cause this. I should let my clinician know about this if it occurs.
• It unknown if taking estrogen increases the risk of breast cancer. . 


4. I understand that the following changes are generally not permanent (that is, they will likely reverse if I stop taking feminizing medications):
• Skin may become softer. • Muscle mass decreases and there may be a decrease in upper body strength.
• Body hair growth may become less noticeable and grow more slowly, but it will likely not stop completely even after years on medication. 
• Male pattern baldness may slow down, but will probably not stop completely, and hair that has already been lost will likely not grow back.
• Fat may redistribute to a more feminine pattern (decreased in abdomen, increased buttocks/hips/thighs – changing from “apple shape” to “pear shape”). 

5. I understand that taking feminizing medications will make my testicles produce less testosterone, which can affect my overall sexual function: 
• Sperm may not mature, leading to reduced fertility. The ability to make sperm normally may or may not come back even after stopping taking feminizing medication. I can choose to have my sperm banked http://www.fertilityoregon.com/lab/process.htm if I want to have the option of pregnancy in the future. I understand that I may still be able to make someone pregnant and am aware of birth control options (if applicable).
• Testicles may shrink by 25-50%. I should do regular testicular self- examination. 
• The amount of fluid ejaculated may be reduced. 
• There is typically decrease in morning and spontaneous erections. • Erections may not be firm enough for penetrative sex.
• Libido (sex drive) may decrease. 


6. I understand that there will be aspects of my body that will not significantly change by use of feminizing medications:
• Beard/moustache hair may grow more slowly and be less noticeable, but will not go away. • Voice pitch will not rise and speech patterns will not become more feminine. • The laryngeal prominence (“Adam’s apple”) will not shrink. Other treatments that may be helpful change these features. I can request a referral from my clinician to specialists to help change these features.

In Hubbard’s diary he wrote quote…. “ … estrogenl in 5 miligram doses makes you thrill to colour and makes you kinder …”  … he was writing about himself … “ … you will have no fear as to what any woman will think of you and your bed conduct … you know you are a master … you know you will be trilled ..” … this self medication made l Ron Hubbard the man that he was for the last 40 years of his miserable pathetic life … how he acquired these medications and other drugs was simplicity itself …  he visits a Veterans Medical Administration and stole a doctors prescription pad … he then wrote prescriptions for any and all drugs he wanted … on board his ship Appollo he once bragged about his large drug supply on board … stating that he has access to everything and anything Pharacutical that anyone could possibly wish for and some … in Hubbard’s diaries he continued on that theme …

“... back in 1942 on September 17th or thereabouts I was training in Miami Florida I met a girl named Ginger who excited me … she was a very lose person but pretended to have a great love for me … from her I received an infection of Gonorrhea  …. I was terrified of it .. the consequences of it being discovered by my wife and maybe my friends ….. I went to a private doctor … who treated me with sofasitol and so forth … I though I was cured but on the plane to Portland Oregan I found I was not cured …  I took to dosing myself with sulfur in such quantities that I was afraid that I had affected my brain …” .. and he was right … I should also mention that in the same diary entry he wrote ….

“... I carry this fear that a would carry this disease ..Gonorrhea  …. to sea with me.,, I was reprimanded at sea in 1943 in Santeago for firing on the Mexican Coast and was removed from command of my ship …. this on top of having sunk two Jap subs without credit … the way my crew lied for me at the court of inquiry …. the insults of the High Command …decided to put me into hospital with ulcers …” .. I| think it rather amazing that Hubbard would admit that his crew lied for him at the navy’s board of inquiry of Ron Hubbard attacking Mexico … as for sinking two Japanese Submarines without credit … his own report on the incident specifically asked that no such credit me given …  on December 6th, 1945 … Hubbard … abandoned his family … his first wife being Polly Grubb …. and he went to Pasedena California and took up residence with black ceremonial sex magician … Jack Whiteside Parsens … Parsons was a founding member of the Jep Propulsion Labratory …information about Parsons .

Jack Parsons, a chemist who went on to be a noted expert in rocket propulsion. Jack Parsons was also an avid student and practitioner of the occult. Helen and Jack were engaged in July 1934 and married in April 1935.  Parsons' interest in the occult led in 1939 to him and Helen joining the Pasadena branch of the Ordo Templi Orientis (O.T.O.).. 

John Whiteside "Jack" Parsons (born Marvel Whiteside Parsons
https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Jack_Parsons_(rocket_engineer)


John Whiteside "Jack" Parsons (born Marvel Whiteside Parsons;[nb 1] October 2, 1914 – June 17, 1952) was an American rocket engineer and rocket propulsion researcher, chemist, and Thelemite occultist. Associated with the California Institute of Technology (Caltech), Parsons was one of the principal founders of both the Jet Propulsion Laboratory (JPL) and the Aerojet Engineering Corporation. He invented the first rocket engine to use a castable, composite rocket propellant,[1] and pioneered the advancement of both liquid-fuel and solid-fuel rockets.

Born in Los Angeles, Parsons was raised by a wealthy family on Orange Grove Avenue in Pasadena. Inspired by science fiction literature, he developed an interest in rocketry in his childhood and in 1928 began amateur rocket experiments with school friend Ed Forman. He dropped out of Pasadena Junior College and Stanford University due to financial difficulties during the Great Depression, and in 1934 he united with Forman and graduate student Frank Malina to form the Caltech-affiliated Guggenheim Aeronautical Laboratory (GALCIT) Rocket Research Group, supported by GALCIT chairman Theodore von Kármán. In 1939 the GALCIT Group gained funding from the National Academy of Sciences (NAS) to work on Jet-Assisted Take Off (JATO) for the U.S. military. Following American entry into World War II, in 1942 they founded Aerojet to develop and sell their JATO technology; the GALCIT Group became JPL in 1943.

After a brief involvement with Marxism in 1939, Parsons converted to Thelema, the English occultist Aleister Crowley's new religious movement. In 1941, alongside his first wife Helen Northrup, Parsons joined the Agape Lodge, the Californian branch of the Thelemite Ordo Templi Orientis (O.T.O.). At Crowley's bidding, he replaced Wilfred Talbot Smith as its leader in 1942 and ran the Lodge from his mansion on Orange Grove Avenue. Parsons was expelled from JPL and Aerojet in 1944 due to the Lodge's infamous reputation, along with his hazardous workplace conduct.

In 1945 Parsons separated from Helen after having an affair with her sister Sara; when Sara left him for L. Ron Hubbard, he conducted the Babalon Working, a series of rituals designed to invoke the Thelemic goddess Babalon to Earth. He and Hubbard continued the procedure with Marjorie Cameron, whom Parsons married in 1946. After Hubbard and Sara defrauded him of his life savings, Parsons resigned from the O.T.O. and went through various jobs while acting as a consultant for the Israeli rocket program. Amid the climate of McCarthyism, he was accused of espionage and left unable to work in rocketry. In 1952 Parsons died at the age of 37 in a home laboratory explosion that attracted national media attention; the police ruled it an accident, but many associates suspected suicide or murder.

Parsons' occult and libertarian writings were published posthumously, with Western esoteric and countercultural circles citing him as one of the most significant figures in propagating Thelema across North America. Although academic interest in his scientific career was negligible, historians came to recognize Parsons' contributions to rocket engineering. For these innovations, his advocacy of space exploration and human spaceflight, and his role in the founding of JPL and Aerojet, Parsons is regarded as among the most important figures in the history of the U.S. space program. He has been the subject of several biographies and fictionalized portrayals, including the television drama Strange Angel. that Hubbard and Parsons engaged in homosexual sex magic was published about two years ago .. Hubbard managed to find enough labito to convince Parson’s girl friend Sara Elizabeth Bruce Northrup to leave Parsons and run away with him …. taking Parson’s money at the same time … eventually Sara Elizabeth Bruce Northrup and Hubbard married each other without Hubbard bothering to divorse his first wife … Miss Grubb first … very sadly and tragically L Ron Hubbard took to tourchering Sara Elizabeth Bruce Northrup …. and performing bizarre mind control experiments upon her … he tried to talk her into killing herself after telling him that she wanted a divorce from L Ron Hubbard … 

By October, the Foundation's financial affairs had reached a crisis point. According to his public relations assistant, Barbara Klowden, Hubbard became increasingly paranoid and authoritarian due to "political and organizational problems with people grabbing for power." He began an affair with the twenty-year-old Klowden, much to the annoyance of Northrup, who was clearly aware of the liaison. Klowden recalled that Northrup "was very hostile to me. We were talking about guns and she said to me that I was the type to use a Saturday night special" (a very cheap "junk gun"). One evening he arranged a double-date with his wife and Klowden, who was accompanied by Hollister, an instructor in the Los Angeles Dianetic Foundation. The dinner party backfired drastically; Northrup began an affair with Hollister, a handsome 22-year-old who was college-educated and a noted sportsman.

The marriage was in the process of breaking down rapidly. Northrup and Hubbard had frequent rows and his violent behaviour towards her continued unabated. On one occasion, while Northrup was pregnant, Hubbard kicked her several times in the stomach in an apparent – though unsuccessful – attempt to induce an abortion. She recalled that "with or without an argument, there'd be an upsurge of violence. The veins in his forehead would engorge" and he would hit her "out of the blue", breaking her eardrum in one attack. Despite this, she still "felt so guilty about the fact that he was so psychologically damaged. I felt as though he had given so much to our country and I couldn't even bring him peace of mind. I believed thoroughly that he was a man of great honor, had sacrificed his well being to the country ... It just never occurred to me he was a liar." He told her that he didn't want to be married "for I can buy my friends whenever I want them" but he could not divorce either, as the stigma would hurt his reputation. Instead, he said, if Northrup really loved him she should kill herself.

Klowden recalled later that "he was very down in the dumps about his wife. He told me how he had met Northrup. He said he went to a party and got drunk and when he woke up in the morning he found Northrup was in bed with him. He was having a lot of problems with her. I remember he said to me I was the only person he knew who would set up a white silk tent for him. I was rather surprised when we were driving back to LA on Sunday evening, he stopped at a florist to buy some flowers for his wife." In November 1950, Northrup attempted suicide by taking sleeping pills. Hubbard blamed Klowden for the suicide bid and told her to forget about him and the Foundation, but resumed the affair with her again within a month.

Hubbard attempted to patch up the marriage in January 1951 by inviting Northrup and baby Alexis to Palm Springs, California where he had rented a house.[49] The situation soon became tense again; Richard de Mille, nephew of the famous director Cecil B. de Mille, recalled that "there was a lot of turmoil and dissension in the Foundation at the time; he kept accusing Communists of trying to take control and he was having difficulties with Northrup. It was clear their marriage was breaking up – she was very critical of him and he told me she was fooling around with Hollister and he didn't trust her." Hubbard enlisted de Mille and another Dianeticist, Dave Williams, in an attempt to convince her to stay with him. John Sanborne, who worked with Hubbard for many years, recalled:

Earlier on (before the divorce) he made this stupid attempt to get Northrup brainwashed so she'd do what he said. He kept her sitting up in a chair, denying her sleep, trying to use Black Dianetic principles on her, repeating over and over again whatever he wanted her to do. Things like, "Be his wife, have a family that looks good, not have a divorce." Or whatever. He had Dick de Mille reciting this sort of thing day and night to her.

Northrup went to a psychiatrist to obtain advice about Hubbard's increasingly violent and irrational behaviour, and was told that he probably needed to be institutionalized and that she was in serious danger. 

She gave Hubbard an ultimatum: get treatment or she would leave with the baby. He was furious and threatened to kill Alexis rather than let Northrup care for her: "He didn't want her to be brought up by me because I was in league with the doctors. He thought I had thrown in with the psychiatrists, with the devils."[52] She left Palm Springs on February 3, leaving Hubbard to complain that Northrup "had hypnotized him in his sleep and commanded him not to write."

in April, 1951 Sara Elizabeth Bruce Northrup managed to file papers for a divorce … during this time Sarah Northrow testified as to the abuses and rituals Hubbard inflicted upon her … to blackmail Sara Elizabeth Bruce Northrup into keepoing silent about his insane abuses committed to  Sara Elizabeth Bruce Northrup … Hubbard kidnapped Sarah’s infant child Alexus and gave the infant to two accomplises named Vince  McGonagal and Frank Desler .. McDonagal took the child to Cuba while Desler and Hubbard kidnapped Sara Elizabeth Bruce Northrup herself on the 24th day of February, 1951 … they took Sara Elizabeth Bruce Northrup to Huma, Arisona … and after explaining to Sara Elizabeth Bruce Northrup what would happen to the infant if Sarah didn’t wise up and drop the divorce case … they dumped Sarah on the side of the highway to think about their threat … Sarah did not cancel the divorce … and instead her lawyer filed a writ of Habeas Corpus … on the 10th of Apil, 1951 .. demanding the return on the infant … the FBI got involved as well as the department of state … and eventually the infant was returned her her motherSara Elizabeth Bruce Northrup… for the next three years ... Hubbard kept spies watching Sara Elizabeth Bruce Northrup and the infant Alexus ... because he was fearful that they would demand their rightfull share of his Dianetics and Scientology Business profits ... 

Wikipedia describes the kidnapping of Alexus in  more detail 
https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Sara_Northrup_Hollister

Three weeks later, Hubbard abducted both Northrup and Alexis. On the night of February 24, 1951, Alexis was being looked after by John Sanborne while Northrup had a night at the movies. Hubbard turned up and took the child. A few hours later, he returned with two of his Dianetics Foundation staff and told Northrup, who was now back at her apartment: "We have Alexis and you'll never see her alive unless you come with us."[53] She was bundled into the back of a car and driven to San Bernardino, California, where Hubbard attempted to find a doctor to examine his wife and declare her insane. His search was unsuccessful and he released her at Yuma Airport across the state line in Arizona. He promised that he would tell her where Alexis was if she signed a piece of paper saying that she had gone with him voluntarily. Northrup agreed but Hubbard reneged on the deal and flew to Chicago, where he found a psychologist who wrote a favorable report about his mental condition to refute Northrup's accusations.[39] Rather than telling Northrup where Alexis was, he called her and said that "he had cut [Alexis] into little pieces and dropped the pieces in a river and that he had seen little arms and legs floating down the river and it was my fault, I'd done it because I'd left him."[53]

Hubbard subsequently returned to the Foundation in Elizabeth, New Jersey. There he wrote a letter informing the FBI that Northrup and her lover Miles Hollister – whom he had fired from the Foundation's staff and, according to Hollister, had also threatened to kill[54] – were among fifteen "known or suspected Communists" in his organization.[55] He listed them as:

SARA NORTHRUP (HUBBARD): formerly of 1003 S. Orange Grove Avenue, Pasadena, Calif. 25 yrs. of age, 5'10", 140 lbs. Currently missing somewhere in California. Suspected only. Had been friendly with many Communists. Currently intimate with them but evidently under coercion. Drug addiction set in fall 1950. Nothing of this known to me until a few weeks ago. Separation papers being filed and divorce applied for.

MILES HOLLISTER:  Somewhere in the vicinity of Los Angeles. Evidently a prime mover but very young. About 22 yrs, 6', 180 lbs. Black hair. Sharp chin, broad forehead, rather Slavic. Confessedly a member of the Young Communists. Center of most turbulence in our organization. Dissmissed [sic] in February when affiliations discovered. Active and dangerous. Commonly armed. Outspokenly disloyal to the U.S.[56]

In another letter sent in March, Hubbard told the FBI that Northrup was a Communist and a drug addict, and offered a $10,000 reward to anyone who could resolve Northrup's problems through the application of Dianetics techniques.[57]

Northrup filed a kidnapping complaint with the Los Angeles Police Department on her return home but was rebuffed by the police, who dismissed the affair as a mere domestic dispute.[58] After a fruitless six-week search she finally filed a writ of habeas corpus at the Los Angeles Superior Court in April 1951, demanding the return of Alexis. The dispute immediately became front-page news: the newspapers ran headlines such as "Cult Founder Accused of Tot Kidnap", "'Dianetic' Hubbard Accused of Plot to Kidnap Wife", and "Hiding of Baby Charged to Dianetics Author".[59] Hubbard fled to Havana, Cuba, where he wrote a letter to Northrup:

Dear Sara,
I have been in the Cuban military hospital and I am being transferred to the United States next week as a classified scientist immune from interference of all kinds.
Though I will be hospitalized probably a long time, Alexis is getting excellent care. I see her every day. She is all I have to live for.
My wits never gave way under all you did and let them do but my body didn't stand up. My right side is paralyzed and getting more so. I hope my heart lasts. I may live a long time and again I may not. But Dianetics will last 10,000 years – for the Army and Navy have it now.
My Will is all changed. Alexis will get a fortune unless she goes to you as she would then get nothing. Hope to see you once more. Goodbye – I love you.
Ron. [note 1]


In reality, Hubbard had made an unsuccessful request for assistance from the US military attaché to Havana. The attaché did not act on the request; having asked the FBI for background information, he was told that Hubbard had been interviewed but the "agent conducting interview considered Hubbard to be [a] mental case."[59] On April 19, as Barbara Klowdan recorded in her journal, Hubbard telephoned her from Wichita and told her "he was not legally married. His first wife had not obtained divorce until '47 and he was married in '46. According to him, Sara had served a stretch at Tahatchapie [sic] (in a desert woman's prison) and was a dope addict."[45] A few days later – while still married to Northrup – he proposed marriage to Klowdan.

more facts about L Ron Hubbard to follow in following videos...


The Unbreakable Miss Lovely - The story of Paulette’s terrifying ordeal is told in full for the first time in The Unbreakable Miss Lovely, published by Silvertail Books in London. It reveals the shocking details of the darkest chapter in Scientology’s checkered history, which ended with senior members in prison, and the organization’s reputation permanently damaged. “A brilliant exposition of how a child who escaped the Nazis grew up to be hunted by the Church of Scientology” – BBC journalist John Sweeney.“A page-turner packed with barely believable facts. The details are worthy of John le Carre” – Jon Atack, author of A Piece of Blue Sky
Nathan Rabin, The A.V. Club: “Before Tony Ortega’s The Unbreakable Miss Lovely, Cooper’s story had never been told in full. It is one of the most remarkable and unlikely narratives in the sprawling field of Scientology exposés. Ortega’s specialty is his ability to contextualize Cooper’s soap-opera life within the raging currents of history. Cooper embodied her times: She was a child of World War II and the Holocaust, an orphan of one of the 20th century’s greatest tragedies who grew up to be the epitome of the chic New York career woman…Scientology’s persecution of Cooper comes to feel like a strange echo of the Watergate controversy riveting the nation at the same time. People who profess to be the victims of sinister, far-reaching conspiracies are often seen as crazy, but Cooper genuinely was the victim of a sinister, far-reaching conspiracy…In the kind of twist that fills The Unbreakable Miss Lovely and makes it such a compulsively readable page-turner, Cooper discovers too late that, like far too many people in her life, [L. Ron] Hubbard Jr. (or “Nibs” as he was known) was not what he appeared to be, and was probably a double agent working against Cooper on Scientology’s behalf…Cooper should have been destroyed by Scientology. But she proved astonishingly brave and bold. The book’s title proves appropriate both because Cooper is model gorgeous but also unbreakable, with a spirit strong enough to stand up to an entire organization out to destroy her and everything she stands for. In that respect, the book is oddly inspiring.”Kirkus Reviews: “Ortega, in his nonfiction debut, describes a journalist’s decadeslong battle against the Church of Scientology. There have been assertions of horror stories involving the Church of Scientology in a plethora of books, articles, documentaries, and interviews with ex-members. This new account focuses on Paulette Cooper, one of the first journalists to investigate what many see as the questionable moral practices of L. Ron Hubbard’s religion—and one of the first people, he says, to become a target of its vengeance. In a 1969 article in Queen magazine and later in a 1971 book, The Scandal of Scientology, Cooper offered a damning exploration of the church and its practices. “More than previous writers,” notes Ortega, “Paulette focused on the harassment of those who dared to speak up about Scientology, whether they’d been in the church or not.” In response to her words, Ortega says, the church set out to destroy her life with an unprecedented yearslong campaign of litigation, defamation, intimidation, and harassment that pushed the journalist nearly to the point of suicide.

https://tonyortega.org/the-unbreakable-miss-lovely/

The Religious Technology Center, (RTC), 

www.rtc.org/

Learn about the Religious Technology Center, (RTC), Chairman of the Board David Miscavige, and its role as holder of Scientology and Dianetics trademarks.

INTRODUCTION
Religious Technology Center, (RTC) the holder of the Dianetics and Scientology Trademarks
The materials of Dianetics and Scientology comprise more than 35 million spoken and written words of the religion’s founder L. Ron Hubbard. Scientology is an applied religious philosophy and is the spiritual cornerstone for millions of people across all continents. At the heart of this fastest growing religious movement on Earth today is an absolutely unique view of man as an inherently spiritual being — intrinsically good, immortal and omnipotent.
Thousands of new people discover Scientology each week and take their first step toward true spiritual freedom, while hundreds of new Scientology organizations open doors to meet the ever-increasing demand for Mr. Hubbard’s technologies. Scientology has become the most broadly inclusive movement to emerge in the 20th Century, embracing people from all walks of life, from every denomination and every faith. 

Ron Hubbard on the left - Carper and Hubbard constructed a sluice. Hubbard said –
“After locating a likely spot, Carper built a test sluice from discarded boards, and we began the task of sluicing the Negro in hope of fabulous riches. The sluice itself was a simple affair—a twenty-foot box without a top, a foot deep and a foot wide…

Top 10 Celebrities Who Left Scientology
https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=BfwjhOZPOh8


WatchMojo.com, Published on Jun 17, 2018
Top 10 Celebrities Who Left Scientology Subscribe: http://goo.gl/Q2kKrD and also Ring the Bell to get notified // Have a Top 10 idea? Submit it to us here! http://watchmojo.com/suggest The Church of Scientology may have some big names, but they couldn’t keep these notable ones. Stars like Brad Pitt, Katie Holmes and Christopher Reeve have all dabbled in Scientology, before deciding it wasn’t for them. WatchMojo is counting down the top 10 stars who left Scientology. Check out some more great celebrity content from WatchMojo: Top 10 Celebrities With Weird Hidden Talents: https://youtu.be/9JaufaQOdc0 Top 10 Notorious Celebrity Gold Diggers: https://youtu.be/lXk5LSOGC_8 Top 10 Celebrity Hipsters: https://youtu.be/hvZqembnRbk #10: Jerry Seinfeld #9: Brad Pitt #8: William S. Burroughs #7: Don Simpson #6: Katie Holmes #5: Jason Lee #4: Christopher Reeve #3, #2 & #1??? Watch on WatchMojo: http://www.WatchMojo.com Special thanks to our users Tomi and yourbestfriend for suggesting this idea! Check out the voting page at https://www.watchmojo.com/suggest/Top... Check our our other channels! http://www.youtube.com/mojoplays http://www.youtube.com/mojotalks http://www.youtube.com/msmojo http://www.youtube.com/jrmojo http://www.youtube.com/watchmojouk WatchMojo's Social Media Pages http://www.Facebook.com/WatchMojo http://www.Twitter.com/WatchMojo http://instagram.com/watchmojo Get WatchMojo merchandise at shop.watchmojo.com WatchMojo’s ten thousand videos on Top 10 lists, Origins, Biographies, Tips, How To’s, Reviews, Commentary and more on Pop Culture, Celebrity, Movies, Music, TV, Film, Video Games, Politics, News, Comics, Superheroes. Your trusted authority on ranking Pop Culture.

 Scientology & Paul Haggis: 'It's a Cult' - NBC News, Part 1 of 2
https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=meN7Nb--q7w
ReportsOnScientology
Published on Jan 18, 2013
Scientology is a cult, says Academy Award-winning director Paul Haggis, a Scientologist for 34 years. Also, one family tells its story of escaping Scientology. Rock Center with Brian Williams, NBC News, aired January 17, 2013

Scientology & Paul Haggis: 'It's a Cult' - NBC News, Part 2 of 2

ReportsOnScientology
Published on Jan 18, 2013
Scientology is a cult, says Academy Award-winning director Paul Haggis, a Scientologist for 34 years. Also, one family tells its story of escaping Scientology. Rock Center with Brian Williams, NBC News, aired January 17, 2013.

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=meN7Nb--q7w

Scientology's Great Grandson Warns Against the Cult | Interview with Jamie DeWolf
https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=iGlvu_mxF00

breakingtheset
Published on Nov 1, 2013
Abby Martin interviews Jamie DeWolf, the great-grandson of Scientology founder L. Ron Hubbard. DeWolf calls Scientology a brainwashing cult and fears for his own life for speaking out against the religious institution. LIKE Breaking the Set @ http://fb.me/BreakingTheSet FOLLOW Abby Martin @ http://twitter.com/AbbyMartin

Willian Wiseman, ......Sir George Mansfield Smith-Cumming sent Sir William Wiseman to run the British intelligence effort in America. Wiseman and Colonel House were good buddies. Wiseman was the handler of House, and House was invested in controlling American President Woodrow Wilson. Wiseman and House worked together on handling Wilson to get America into the war. 

The USS PC-815, L Ron Hubbard's second and final command

Jon Atack and Steven Hassan discuss his 2013 edition of his book, A Piece of Blue Sky
https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=VM_kWQAR0iY&feature=youtu.be&t=20m39s

Freedom of Mind Resource Center
Published on Dec 29, 2014
Steve Hassan sits down with Jon Atack after not seeing each other for many years and has a very revealing conversation about L. Ron Hubbard, Scientology, his important and tireless work exposing the cult, and the significance of his research. Jon has one of the best minds I have ever encountered. He remembers everything Hubbard has written and everything that was written (of significance) about Hubbard and the group and wrote the definitive book on the founder and teachings of the group. This book is a must read for everyone who has ever been involved with Scientology in any way! Note: It has been questioned whether climbed the Scientology Bridge twice, and said that he was actually Class IX, rather than Class XII. Jon Atack was told this by a Scientology official, but suggests caution, until this is checked. As ever, he would appreciate accurate information. Don't be shy, Jon is always happy to be put right on even the slightest detail.


Comments
John A.4
Fascinating man Jon Atack. I have a feeling these guys could sit up and talk all night--kindred spirits--each an intellectual.
Steve Aldrich
Piece of Blue Sky is the best scientology book. Buy 2 copies. One for yourself and one for your local public library.
blueshirttail
Still the best overall book about Scientology

Round To It
I just ordered A Piece of Blue Sky online from a used book dealer, can't wait to read it. Thank you for posting this interview. Very interesting. 
Barny Fraggles
Thanks for posting this. Nice to hear from Jon 'in person'. As expected, a fascinating, compassionate and eloquent man with an encyclopaedic knowledge and balls of steel. Absolutely disgusting to hear about the Janet Reitman's lazy plagiarism but not all that surprising, she seemed notably ignorant of basic details during interviews.          
Exiles800
Whether intentional or not Atack made a fantasy book about Jimi Hendrix while his murder goes unaddressed in England. The affect is to relegate Jimi to the unreal and therefore impede the terribly denied justice he needs.
Top Tier Teal Tipped Spears
I used to be a heavy smoker (or so I thought) but 100 cigarettes a day sounds unreal. I don’t know how you can manage to smoke 5 packs a day, that’s half a carton. Must’ve been chain smoking every moment of the day.
Carolyn Bateman
Contradiction in a hypnotic technique that uses confusion and cognitive dissonance to bypass the conscious mind. So much of this technique is being used on main stream tv today. I.e. Building 7 has fallen when it is still up in the background. Or nonsense slogans like "we are for free speech- silence the fascists". It is fascinating in that it can actually cause nausea
Theresa Akins
i dont understand why The U.S. would censor your book. It is against the Constitution. And why would American courts side with Hubbard, a known enemy of the US!? Operation Snowflake should have taught the government not to trust Hubbard. Did he hold any sway with the Justice system or have powerful friends in politics to help him? I have read the contrary.
Anonimo Fiorentino
Hollywood writer Skip Press, while detailing his long-term and high-achieving membership in Scientology, recommends John Atack’s new book, Let’s Sell These People a Piece of Blue Sky. Press says the book is better than Lawrence Wright’s recent fine book on the church because ”Atack was actually involved with the cult and lived it.” (Morton Report, 11/7/13) [IT 5.2]


A Piece of Blue Sky: Scientology, Dianetics, and L. Ron Hubbard ExposedHardcover – 29 Jun 1999 by Jon Atack  (Author)
https://www.amazon.co.uk/Piece-Blue-Sky-Scientology-Dianetics/dp/081840499X

Atack exposes Hubbard's bizarre imagination and behavior, tracing the creation of Scientology in the years following World War II to perhaps its final schism following Hubbard's death in 1986. A shocking book that reveals all: the abuses, falsehoods, paranoia, and greed of Hubbard and his pseudo-military Scientologist henchmen.
A Piece of Blue Sky: Scientology, Dianetics and L. Ron Hubbard Exposed is a 1990 book about L. Ron Hubbard and the development of Dianetics and the Church of Scientology by British former Scientologist Jon Atack. The title originates from a quote of Hubbard's from 1950, when he was reported as saying that he wanted to sell potential church members a "piece of blue sky."[1]
The church's publishing arm, New Era Publications International, tried to prevent the book's publication, arguing that it infringed on its copyright of Hubbard's works. A court in Manhattan ruled against publication, but the decision was overturned on appeal.[2]
https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/A_Piece_of_Blue_Sky

John Atack the Author of A Piece of Blue Sky: Scientology, Dianetics and L. Ron Hubbard Exposed

Atack joined Scientology at the age of nineteen in 1974, and was based largely in the church's British headquarters at Saint Hill Manor, near East Grinstead. During his training, he said he progressed to Scientology's Operating Thetan level 5, completing 24 of the 27 levels of therapy or education.[3] He left the church in 1983 in disillusionment with the new leadership of David Miscavige, who took over in the early 1980s.[4] He writes that he saw the new management as tough and ruthless, and objected particularly to the 15-fold increase in training fees. He also objected to being told not to have relationships with so-called "Suppressive Persons," people the church had declared enemies and who should not be communicated with; one such person was one of Atack's friends.[5]
Atack left the sect as a result, and is now at the centre of what J. Gordon Melton calls an anti-Scientology network in the UK.[6] He is also the author of a booklet, "The Total Freedom Trap: Scientology, Dianetics And L. Ron Hubbard" (1992).

Synopsis
John Atack describes his personal experience in the church, provides a chronological history of L. Ron Hubbard, Dianetics and Scientology, researched from paper sources and interviews, and draws conclusions about the belief system of Scientology and its founder. The book also contains a preface by Russell Miller, author of Bare-faced Messiah.
Reception to the publication of John Atack’s book the Author of A Piece of Blue Sky: Scientology, Dianetics and L. Ron Hubbard Exposed

Legal action
Scientology's publishing arm, New Era Publications, attempted to prevent publication by arguing that the manuscript's inclusion of material by Hubbard infringed on their copyright of Hubbard's work, and would harm sales of the original texts.[7] The court ruled that the manuscript might discourage people from buying Hubbard's books by convincing them he was a swindler, and that copyright law protects rather than forbids this kind of criticism.[8] Before the outcome of the case was known, the publisher prepared two versions of the book: one with and one without Hubbard's quoted material.[2] After publication, Scientologists picketed Atack's East Grinstead home for six days and spread defamatory leaflets around his neighbourhood.[9]
In April 1995, a court in England found Atack guilty of libel against Margaret Hodkin, the headmistress of Scientology's Greenfields School in England, and issued an injunction forbidding publication of an offending paragraph.[10] The decision was upheld by the High Court in London in May 1995.[11] The case led Amazon.com to remove the book from its listings in February 1999, but it reversed its decision a few months later after customers complained.[12]

Reviews
Marco Frenschkowski, writing in the Marburg Journal of Religion in 1999, describes A Piece of Blue Sky as "the most thorough general history of Hubbard and Scientology, very bitter, but always well-researched."[13] It has been used as a source by several academic papers.[14] The Tampa Tribune-Times said that Atack's provision of extensive detail and source notes for each claim sometimes gets in the way of the story, but prevents the book from being just another bitter diatribe against Scientology.[4]

 References
 A Piece of Blue Sky, p. iii: "It was 1950, in the early, heady days of Dianetics, soon after L. Ron Hubbard opened the doors of his first organization to the clamoring crowd. Up until then, Hubbard was known only to readers of pulp fiction, but now he had an instant best-seller with a book that promised to solve every problem of the human mind, and the cash was pouring in. Hubbard found it easy to create schemes to part his new following from their money. One of the first tasks was to arrange "grades" of membership, offering supposedly greater rewards, at increasingly higher prices. Over thirty years later, an associate wryly remembered Hubbard turning to him and confiding, no doubt with a smile, "Let's sell these people a piece of blue sky."
^ Jump up to:a b "Publisher Victorious on Hubbard Biography", The New York Times, May 27, 1990.
^ A Piece of Blue Sky, p. 34.
^ Jump up to:a b Shinkle, Kevin. "The religion that sells the sky," The Tampa Tribune-Times, October 20, 1991.
^ A Piece of Blue Sky, p. 35ff.
^ Melton, J. Gordon. "Birth of a Religion," in James R. Lewis (ed). Scientology. Oxford University Press, 2009, footnote 32, p. 33. Also see Mikael Rothstein. "His name was Xenu ... he used renegades. Aspects of Scientology's founding myth", in Lewis, 2009, p. 369, which refers to Atack as a "decades-long zealous campaigner against Scientology."
^ Harris, Daniel (July 2, 1989). "Scientology's best seller". New York Post. p. 39.
^ Hurowitz, Richard (1997). "Surviving Copyright Infringement: Fair Use of Protected Works in "Biopics"". Columbia-VLA Journal of Law & the Arts. Columbia University School of Law. 22 (2): 247–268. ISSN 1544-4848.
^ Palmer, Richard (April 3, 1994). "Cult Accused of Intimidation". The Sunday Times.; "Victims who are 'fair game'". Evening Argus. Brighton (UK). April 12, 1994. pp. 2–3.
^ Bracchi, Paul (June 10, 1994). "The Missing Word". Evening Argus. Brighton, UK. pp. 1, 4–5..
^ Court Injunction, Hodkin v. Atack, May 18, 1995, 1993 H. No.2412.
^ "Amazon.com Backs Off Book Ban", Associated Press, May 21, 1999.
^ Frenschkowski, Marco. "L. Ron Hubbard and Scientology", Marburg Journal of Religion, Volume 4, issue 1, July 1999, p. 7.
^ For examples, see Kent, Stephen A. "Scientology: Is this a Religion?", Marburg Journal of Religion, Volume 4, issue 1, July 1999; Kent, Stephen A. "The Globalization of Scientology: Influence, Control and Opposition in Transnational Markets", Religion, Volume 29, issue 2, pp. 147–169; West, Louis Jolyon. "Psychiatry and Scientology," American Psychiatric Association Annual Meeting, Washington D.C., May 6, 1992.

Mike Rinder Speaks Out - Scientology (part 1 of 2)

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=sOv0LtzXlx4
StopTheAbuse2010, Published on Jul 22, 2010
Part 1 of 2 Broadcast July 22 2010 on Channel Seven's Today Tonight programme

Reporter: Bryan Seymour http://au.todaytonight.yahoo.com

Mike Rinder Speaks Out - Scientology (part 2 of 2)
https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=_vgorwz_s2k

StopTheAbuse2010, Published on Jul 22, 2010
Part 2 of 2 Broadcast July 22 2010 on Channel Seven's Today Tonight programme Reporter: Bryan Seymour http://au.todaytonight.yahoo.com

Illustration by Edd Cartier for Hubbard's story "Fear"[44]

Scientology's Dark Side: A Talk with Tony Ortega
https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=mTgrbrUhoXI

Chris Shelton
Published on Jul 19, 2015
Tony Ortega is a journalist who has worked for over 20 years to expose Scientology's dark underbelly and Gestapo tactics. He not only publishes a daily blog called The Underground Bunker (http://tonyortega.org) but has now written a book called The Unbreakable Miss Lovely, available on amazon. Tony has been doing an international book tour promoting his book and stopped off at The Secular Hub here in Denver, where I was privileged to interview him about his book and Scientology in general. For more information and articles from me, check out my blog at http://mncriticalthinking.com Please consider supporting this channel and helping me to offer more and better content. You can now support me on Patreon! Here is the link: http://patreon.com/chrisshelton To support via Fan Funding, click the blue Support button on the home page https://www.youtube.com/channel/UCF32... To support via PayPal, click the "Donate via PayPal" link on my About page. https://www.youtube.com/channel/UCF32...

 
Robert Vaughn Young - L. Ron Hubbard’s PR & Press Assistant - Secret Lives - Scientology - Dianetics
https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=FyIn2BhWPQo


Keeping.Skepticism.Working
Published on Apr 2, 2015
Robert Vaughn Young - L. Ron Hubbard’s PR & Press Assistant & High Ranking Sea Org Member. "Secret Lives" Scientology - Dianetics. This video is uploaded with the intent of educating the public regarding Scientology and its belief structure and to help preserve the tech for future generations. Uploaded in the spirit of Fair Use Copyright Act of 1976, 17 U.S.C. § 107. All credit for the video goes to its original creator. All rights are reserved by the copyright holder.

https://alchetron.com/Robert-Vaughn-Young


Died  June 15, 2003, Hamilton, Ohio, United States
Similar People  Stacy Brooks, Bob Minton, Arnie Lerma, Mark Bunker, Ronald DeWolf
Robert vaughn young 1 1 deposition in the lisa mcpherson case


https://youtu.be/jyWPJplegfI

The last will and testament benefited David Miscavige, with everything left to the Religious Technology Center, which was controlled by David Miscavige at the time of the death of L Ron Hubbard.  
David Miscavige then took over as head of Scientology after the death of L. Ron Hubbard, the family of L. Ron Hubbard to really been mentioned in his last will and testament Robert Vaughn Young questioned whether the last will and testament was fraudulently changed after the death of L. Ron Hubbard, who he says at the time of his death, L. Ron Hubbard was not living in any reality and had become lost in the stories he created during his life and in the opinion of Robert Vaughn Young, L Ron Hubbard did at the time of his death was not capable of knowing the difference between reality and fiction. Robert Vaughn Young goes on to say that a story had to be created for the Scientology followers that made L. Ron Hubbard, immortal ….by telling all the Scientology followers that L. Ron Hubbard, immortal had thrown his physical body away for his spirit to be fee to search and explore the higher levels of Scientology 

The Scandal of Scientology (1971) By Paulette Cooper - A chilling examination of the nature, beliefs and practices of the “now religion”.

called the American Hero ... The   Paulette Cooper Story - how one woman exposed Scientology and survived their attacks

Ron Hubbard’s next intelligence assignment was issuing British propaganda.
William Wiseman was the head of MI6 in the United States. In the mid 1930′s Wiseman was sent to Hollywood where he used his influence to “encourage a favorable portrayal of the British Empire in American films”

Mr DeWolf is grandson of Ron DeWolf, L. Ron Hubbard's eldest son, pictured left holding Jamie's mother, and L. Ron Hubbard in the middle

L Ron Hubbard and second wife Sara

Scientology's Great Grandson Warns Against the Cult | Interview with Jamie DeWolf
https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=iGlvu_mxF00

breakingtheset, Published on Nov 1, 2013
Abby Martin interviews Jamie DeWolf, the great-grandson of Scientology founder L. Ron Hubbard. DeWolf calls Scientology a brainwashing cult and fears for his own life for speaking out against the religious institution. LIKE Breaking the Set @ http://fb.me/BreakingTheSet FOLLOW Abby Martin @ http://twitter.com/AbbyMartin

William Walters Sargant .Sargant experimented with numerous vicious drugs and drugs given in combination. He also performed leucotomies. Sargant spent 38 years butchering people with his horrific treatments.

All of the basic mental, spiritual, and religious ideas found in Dianetics and Scientology were already developed by the Society for Psychical Research, before L. Ron Hubbard was even born.  That includes the therapy used.  Some of what Wikipedia has to say about the life and times of Lafayette Ronald Hubbard

 Lafayette Ronald Hubbard (/ˈhʌbərd/ HUB-ərd in Los Angeles, 1950, Born: Lafayette Ronald Hubbard on the March 13, 1911 in Tilden, Nebraska, United States
Died on the January 24, 1986 (aged 74) in Creston, California, United States. Education: George Washington University (dropped out in 1932)
   Occupation: Author, religious leader ,   Known for bring the Founder of Scientology and its churchm,   Notable work: Dianetics: The Modern Science of  Mental Health and Battlefield Earth,  Criminal charge: Petty theft (in 1948),  Fraud (in absentia, 1978), Criminal penalty: Fine of ₣35,000 and four years in prison (unserved)
Spouse(s): Margaret "Polly" Grubb (1933–1947),,   Sara Northrup Hollister (1946–1951),   Mary Sue Whipp (1952–1986), 
Children: 7: With Margaret Grubb: L. Ron Hubbard Jr.* (d.1991), Katherine May Hubbard*,   With Sara Hollister: Alexis Hubbard*,  With Mary Sue Whipp: Quentin Hubbard (d. 1976), Diana Hubbard, Suzette Hubbard
 Arthur Hubbard* * Estranged from family, Relatives: Jamie DeWolf (great-grandson) 
Lafayette Ronald Hubbard (/ˈhʌbərd/ HUB-ərd; [1] March 13, 1911 – January 24, 1986) was an American author of science fiction and fantasy stories, and the founder of the Church of Scientology. In 1950, Hubbard authored Dianetics: The Modern Science of Mental Health and established a series of organizations to promote Dianetics. In 1952, Hubbard lost the rights to Dianetics in bankruptcy proceedings, and he subsequently founded Scientology. Thereafter Hubbard oversaw the growth of the Church of Scientology into a worldwide organization.  Hubbard was cited by Smithsonian magazine as one of the 100 most significant Americans of all time 
Born in Tilden, Nebraska in 1911, Hubbard spent much of his childhood in Helena, Montana. After his father was posted to the U.S. naval base on Guam, Hubbard traveled to Asia and the South Pacific in the late 1920s. In 1930, Hubbard enrolled at George Washington University to study civil engineering, but dropped out in his second year. He began his career as a prolific writer of pulp fiction stories and married Margaret "Polly" Grubb, who shared his interest in aviation.
Hubbard served briefly in the Marine Corps Reserve and was an officer in the Navy during World War II. He briefly commanded two ships, but was removed from command both times. The last few months of his active service were spent in a hospital, being treated for a duodenal ulcer. 
During the late 1960s and early 1970s, he spent much of his time at sea on his personal fleet of ships as "Commodore" of the Sea Organization, an elite, paramilitary group of Scientologists.[8][9] Some ex-members and scholars have described the Sea Org as a totalitarian organization marked by intensive surveillance and a lack of freedom. Hubbard returned to the United States in 1975 and went into seclusion in the California desert. In 1978, a trial court in France convicted Hubbard of fraud in absentia. In 1983 Hubbard was named as an unindicted co-conspirator in an international information infiltration and theft project called "Operation Snow White".[11][12] He spent the remaining years of his life in a luxury motor home on his California property, attended to by a small group of Scientology officials including his physician. In 1986, L. Ron Hubbard died at age 74. The Church of Scientology describes Hubbard in hagiographic terms,[14] and he portrayed himself as a pioneering explorer, world traveler, and nuclear physicist with expertise in a wide range of disciplines, including photography, art, poetry, and philosophy. Though many of Hubbard's autobiographical statements have been found to be fictitious,[15] the Church rejects any suggestion that its account of Hubbard's life is not historical fact. 
His critics have characterized Hubbard as a mentally-unstable chronic liar

Anderson Live Interview With Jenna Miscavige 2/06/2013

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=LlzkEBk54ms


mackiesyotub
Published on Feb 6, 2013


Anderson Live interview with Jenna Miscavige about her book, Beyond Belief: My Secret Life Inside Scientology and My Harrowing Escape.

Truth About David Miscavige and Wife Shelly's Separation


https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=N9jIew9CQ0U

TheLipTV
Published on Jul 26, 2013
Anderson Live interview with Jenna Miscavige about her book, Beyond Belief: My Secret Life Inside Scientology and My Harrowing Escape.


L Ron Hubbard as a young boy

Ron Miscavige the co author of the book 'My Son David Miscavige, and Me'

Ledora May Hubbard, Ron Hubbard's 's long-suffering mother, and her husband Harry Ross Hubbard, Ron Hubbard's father, in the dress uniform of a US Navy officer and the Waterbury family photographed in their home town of Helena, Montana.  Ledora May Waterbury, Ron Hubbard's mother (left), with an unidentified relative, her sisters Toilie and Midgie and brother Ray

The ledge surrounding the rooftop pool of her apartment building: the perfect spot for an "accident."

Hubbard's novella "The Kingslayer" was reprinted in Two Complete Science-Adventure Books

 in 1950 after its original publication in a 1949 Hubbard collection

Ron Miscavige on ABC's "20/20," 4/29/2016.
https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=CfPLPOfQQss

mackiesyotub
Published on May 3, 2016
Ron Miscavige, the father of Scientology head, David Miscavige, on ABC's "20/20," aired 4/29/2016. Ron talks about joining the Church and it's Sea Org and what eventually lead him to escape The Church and write his book about his son, "Ruthless."

ABC Nightline Jenna Miscavige Part 1
https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=mM07fU412h0

nonymousImpact
Published on May 14, 2009

ABC Nightline Jenna Miscavige part 2
https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=ElYfC3uW7ms

AnonymousImpact
Published on May 14, 200

Anderson Live Interview With Jenna Miscavige 2/06/2013
https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=LlzkEBk54ms

mackiesyotub
Published on Feb 6, 2013
Anderson Live interview with Jenna Miscavige about her book, Beyond Belief: My Secret Life Inside Scientology and My Harrowing Escape.

More MI 6 Psychs Using Abreactive Therapy
In 1935, psycho-psychiatrist William Sargant went to work at Maudsley Hospital, where he worked along with psychiatrist John Rawlings Rees. Sargant used abreactive therapy in conjunction with drugs and electroshock, just like John Rees was doing during World War I.

Robert Vaughn Young - L. Ron Hubbard’s PR & Press Assistant

L. Ron Hubbard sailing to Alaska


Gerry Armstrong: "I am Scientologists' enemy no.1"
https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=0Xrn2nGiYZ4

Киностудия МДА БОГОСЛОВ
Published on Mar 27, 2012

Gerry Armstrong, Ron Hubbard's former personal secretary, talks about his twelve years in Scientology, his reasons for leaving the organization, and Scientologists' attack on his speeches denouncing Scientology. The lecture was given at St.Tikhon's Orthodox University.
States that he wants to reveal an aspect of Scientology as dangerous
Tom Cruise talks about Suppressive Person’s ....The most evil people on the planet which ate 2.5% people in the world..
They can mot be cured and are responsible for every evil on earth
Scientology does not attack and go after real psychopaths
The Suppressive Person Doctrine known as Fair Game makes Scientology a Criminal Organization
states that Suppressive Persons can be tricked, lied to, and destroyed…
Gerry Armstrong, has been run into physically with a car by a private investigator working for Scientology...
Gerry Armstrong and his wife have been terrorized in California and have been sued me six times and forced me into bankruptcy....
The concept of a Suppressive Person  is used in Scientology and against Scientologists  try to keep them into a permanent state of fear..
It was Ron Hubbard’s practice and policy was to destroy a person who tried to doing anything against of speak out against himself or Scientology … using various technique such as declaring a person as a Suppressive Person and using  Black PR against them …. which is used as a way to publicly try and destroy what they say are Suppressive Person’s … such as Gerry Armstrong…
Scientology has tried to get the Russian SSB to investigate Gerry Armstrong…
Scientology has tried to get the Unites States Embassy in Moscow to pick Gerry Armstrong up  to try and  stop Gerry Armstrong from speaking out against Scientology in Russia …


On the Internet there is a mass of Black PR blackening the name of Gerry Armstrong…  Gerry Armstrong has been called ‘a criminal’ and worse …
Gerald "Gerry" Armstrong is a former member of the Church of Scientology. In 1980, the Church assigned Armstrong, then a member of the Church's elite Sea Org, to organize some personal papers of L. Ron Hubbard that were to serve as the basis of a new biography of Hubbard. A non-Scientologist, Omar Garrison, had been hired to write the book. As part of his assignment, Armstrong also requested Hubbard's war records from the Navy and his transcripts from George Washington University.

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Gerry_Armstrong_(activist)

Gerald "Gerry" Armstrong is a former member of the Church of Scientology. In 1980, the Church assigned Armstrong, then a member of the Church's elite Sea Org, to organize some personal papers of L. Ron Hubbard that were to serve as the basis of a new biography of Hubbard. A non-Scientologist, Omar Garrison, had been hired to write the book. As part of his assignment, Armstrong also requested Hubbard's war records from the Navy and his transcripts from George Washington University.

Ruthless: Scientology, My Son David Miscavige, and Me is a book by Ron Miscavige and Dan Koon, published in 2016 by St. Martin's Press in the United States and Silvertail Books in the United Kingdom. Written by the father of Scientology leader David Miscavige, it presents a personal account of life in the Church of Scientology, the rise of David Miscavige to the church's leadership, and the aftermath of Ron Miscavige's decision to leave the church.

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Ruthless:_Scientology,_My_Son_David_Miscavige,_and_Me

Background on the Book Ruthless: Scientology, My Son David Miscavige, and Me by  Ron Miscavige and Dan Koon 
The book is described by its US publisher, St. Martin's Press, as "a riveting insider's look at life within the world of Scientology" which tells the story of "David Miscavige's childhood and his path to the head seat of the Church of Scientology told through the eyes of his father."[1] According to the UK publisher, "Ron [Miscavige] traces the arc of David’s life from his early years to David’s eventual, stellar rise to power in Scientology; his brutal approach to running the organisation today; and the disastrous effects that his leadership has had on countless numbers of Scientologists and their families."[2]
Ruthless tells of how Ron Miscavige and his family joined Scientology in 1971, living for a while in the UK, before moving back to Pennsylvania. By the age of 16 his son David had become a confidant of Scientology's founder, L. Ron Hubbard, and had joined the inner core of the church, the Sea Org. He took over the leadership of Scientology when Hubbard died in 1986.[1]
In 2012, after gaining access to the full Internet via a Kindle, Ron Miscavige discovered new information about the church and subsequently left the Church of Scientology. The Los Angeles Times reported that he was put under surveillance by the Church, which was said to have paid two private investigators to watch him around the clock for 18 months at a cost of $10,000 a week. The surveillance was said to have been "all because [David] Miscavige feared that his father would divulge too much about the organisation's activities." At one point, the investigators were said to have phoned David Miscavige when they thought his father was having a heart attack and were allegedly told not to intervene: "if it was Ron's time to die, to let him die and not intervene in any way". Miscavige denied having ordered the surveillance or speaking to one of the investigators.[3] The incident prompted Ron Miscavige to write the book.[4] According to Tony Ortega, a journalist and writer on Scientology, Ruthless was originally titled If He Dies, He Dies in reference to the "heart attack" incident.[5]
The book is the second memoir to have been published by one of David Miscavige's relatives, after his niece Jenna Miscavige Hill published Beyond Belief: My Secret Life Inside Scientology and My Harrowing Escape in 2012.[6]
The release of the book was preceded by an interview with Ron Miscavige on ABC's long-running news show 20/20, broadcast on April 29, 2016.[7]
In March 2017, Ron Miscavige was the guest on The Thinking Atheist podcast where he was interviewed by host Seth Andrews. Miscavige discussed this book in detail, and elaborated on his escape from Scientology.[8] Miscavige also appeared on The Joe Rogan Experience podcast on April 18, 2017 for an interview about his life in Scientology as detailed in this book.[9]

 Response from the Church of Scientology to the book Ruthless: Scientology, My Son David Miscavige, and Me by  Ron Miscavige and Dan Koon
 

The Church of Scientology International issued a response on April 29, 2016 regarding the ABC 20/20 Ron Miscavige Interview stating that Ron Miscavige was "seeking to make money" on his son David Miscavige’s name. The Church said, "David Miscavige has taken care of his father throughout his life, both financially and by helping him in even the most dire circumstances. Ronald Miscavige was nowhere around when David Miscavige ascended to the leadership of the Church of Scientology, mentored by and working directly with the religion's founder L. Ron Hubbard, and entrusted by him with the future of the Church." The church then stated: "Any father exploiting his son in this manner is a sad exercise in betrayal." The statement ended with an emphasis on David Miscavige’s "vision and dedication” to the church.[10]

The Church of Scientology also built a website (ronmiscavigebook.com) as part of their response to the book.[11]

Threats of legal action against the book Ruthless: Scientology, My Son David Miscavige, and Me by  Ron Miscavige and Dan Koon 
The Church of Scientology has threatened to sue both the US and UK publishers of Ruthless. A letter sent to the UK publishers, Silvertail, alleged that the book "contains malicious, false, misleading and highly defamatory allegations" that Miscavige has "unequivocally denied" and which the letter claims "can only be for blatant commercial gain and vindictive ill will towards our client and his two daughters." It asserts that the book's publication is about "an extremely difficult and an unfortunate family history" and that Ron Miscavige "would not have been in a position to have any direct knowledge or experience of the totally discredited and disproven claims". Humfrey Hunter, the owner of Silvertail, told The Guardian that he was "definitely going ahead – there's no question. I'm very confident that if they were to sue, we would be able to successfully defend the book and its content."[2]

References
 Staff reporter (March 16, 2016). "Scientology Leader's Estranged Father Preps Tell-All Book". Rolling Stone. Retrieved April 29, 2016.
^ Jump up to:a b Flood, Alison (April 27, 2016). "Scientology leader David Miscavige threatens to sue UK publisher over father's memoir". The Guardian. Retrieved April 29, 2016.
^ Christensen, Kim (April 8, 2015). "Scientology head's father was spied on, police report says". Los Angeles Times. Retrieved April 29, 2016.
^ Tobin, Thomas C. (April 30, 2016). "A father speaks out against his son, David Miscavige, revealing deep rifts in Scientology's first family". Tampa Bay Times. Retrieved April 30, 2016.
^ Friedman, Megan (March 16, 2016). "Scientology Leader David Miscavige's Father Is Writing a Tell-All". Esquire. Retrieved April 29, 2016.
^ Schaub, Michael (March 16, 2016). "Scientology leader's father to publish 'Ruthless' memoir". Los Angeles Times. Retrieved April 29, 2016.
^ Sancho, Miguel; McNiff, Eamon; Bentley, John; Effron, Lauren (April 26, 2016). "Scientology Leader David Miscavige's Father on David's Childhood, Why They Joined the Church". ABC. Retrieved April 29, 2016.
^ Andrews, Seth. "Ron Miscavige: Scientology and my Son". Thethinkingatheist.com. The Thinking Atheist. Retrieved 21 April 2017.
^ "Joe Rogan Experience #947 - Ron Miscavige". YouTube.com. YouTube. Retrieved 23 May 2017.
^ News, A. B. C. (30 April 2016). "Church of Scientology April, 29, 2016, Statement to ABC News Regarding Ron Miscavige Interview". Retrieved 19 April 2017.
^ "Father of Scientology leader: Church is 'manipulative, coercive and, in my mind, evil'". Retrieved 19 April 2017.

RTÉ Prime Time - "Scientology - The Return to Ireland"     http://www.awn.bz/Ron_Hubbard_Scientology1.html
Pete Griffiths Published on Dec 18, 2018 From the RTÉ Prime Time blog, by Rita O'Reilly: Scientology has tried to make it big in Ireland before
L.Ron Hubbard’s Lifelong Intelligence Career who fronted for MI6-CIA -  the real owners and controllers of Scientology 
A record from the office of the Secretary of the Navy and the Chief of Naval Operations shows that Hubbard took an “Intelligence Course” from 21 October 1941 to 11 November 1941. . Here is the record from the SECNAV/CNO office files . It says – based on an order that happened on August 11, 1941 (410811), an order was issued on September 30, 1941 that nominated Hubbard to take an Intelligence Course. 15 October 1941 – Office of Naval Intelligence Foreign Intelligence Branch and its Special Intelligence Section (OP-16-F-9) was officially shifted to William Donovan’s Office of the Coordinator of Information, where they went under the COI Special Intelligence Section headed by David K.E. Bruce.   - OP-16-F-9 was now under David K.E. Bruce. At the time of the transfer, thirteen agents had been recruited. Ron Hubbard was one of them.  (See 67 in the References) 20 October 1941 – Hubbard moves to the Explorers Club in New York.  73  21 October 1941 to 11 November 1941 Hubbard took the Intelligence Course. He did this when all Naval Intelligence was now underneath William Donovan. This secret Intelligence Course was done outside of the United States. The proof is this letter that was sent to Hubbard while he was taking the Intelligence Course.  A Century of Naval Intelligence documents that – “At the outbreak of World War II, the Special Intelligence Section (OP-16-F-9) comprised one retired officer, two Naval Reserve officers, two enlisted sailors, and one Naval Reserve officer undergoing training in London.”  

L Ron Hubbard aboard the Mariana Maru – he is 17 years old

 ABC Nightline Jenna Miscavige Part 1
https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=mM07fU412h0


AnonymousImpact, Published on May 14, 2009
ABC Nightline Jenna Miscavige part 2


https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=ElYfC3uW7ms

AnonymousImpact, Published on May 14, 2009

Jenna Miscavige on The View, 2/05/2013
https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=6NFshbZoDrE
mackiesyotub Published on 5 Feb 2013
Jenna Miscavige appears on "The View" to discuss her book, "Beyond Belief: My Secret Life Inside Scientology and My Harrowing Escape."

Gerry Armstrong, the man kneeling in the dust on the top floor of the old Del Sol Hotel at Gilman Hot Springs that afternoon in January 1980, had been a dedicated member of the Church of Scientology for more than a decade. He was logging in Canada when a friend introduced him to Scientology in 1969 and he was immediately swept away by its heady promise of superhuman powers and immortality. During his years as a Scientologist, he had twice been sentenced to long periods in the Rehabilitation Project Force, the cult's own Orwellian prison; he had been constantly humiliated and his marriage had been destroyed, yet he remained totally convinced that L. Ron Hubbard was the greatest man who ever lived.  In November 1981 Armstrong  presented a written report listing the false claims made by Hubbard and putting forward a powerful argument as to why they should be corrected. 'If we present inaccuracies, hyperbole or downright lies as fact or truth,' he wrote, 'it doesn't matter what slant we give them; if disproved, the man will look, to outsiders at least, like a charlatan . . .'The messengers' response was to order Armstrong to be 'security checked' - interrogated as a potential traitor. Armstrong refused. In the spring of 1982, Gerald Armstrong was accused of eighteen different 'crimes' and 'high crimes' against the Church of Scientology, including theft, false pretences and promulgating false information about the church and its founder. He was declared to be a 'suppressive person' and 'fair game', which meant he could be 'tricked, cheated, lied to, sued or destroyed' by his former friends in Scientology. 'By then the whole thing for me had crumbled,' he said. 'I realized I had been drawn into Scientology by a web of lies, by Machiavellian mental control techniques and by fear. The betrayal of trust began with Hubbard's lies about himself. His life was a continuing pattern of fraudulent business practices, tax evasion, flight from creditors and hiding from the law. 'Hubbard  was a mixture of Adolf Hitler, Charlie Chaplin and Baron Munchausen. In short, he was a con man.'  Taken from: Bare-faced Messiah: The True Story of L. Ron Hubbard is a posthumous biography of Scientology founder L. Ron Hubbard by British journalist Russell Miller. Originally published: 26 October 1987 Author: Russell Miller, Genre: Biography, Page count: 380, Publisher: Michael Joseph, Subject: L. Ron Hubbard

David Miscavige, the son of Ron  Miscavige.  David Miscavige took over as head of Scientology after the death of L Ron Hubbard, through David Miscavige's control of The Religious Technology Center, (RTC),  www.rtc.org. L. Ron Hubbard left all the copywrite ownership to the Dianetics, Scientology and books righs to The Religious Technology Center, (RTC),  www.rtc.org

Sara Elizabeth Bruce Northrup Hollister
https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Sara_Northrup_Hollister

Sara Elizabeth Bruce Northrup Hollister (April 8, 1924 – December 19, 1997) played a major role in the creation of Dianetics, which evolved into the religious movement Scientology. She was the second wife of science-fiction author L. Ron Hubbard, who would become the leader of the Church of Scientology.
Northrup was a major figure in the Pasadena branch of the Ordo Templi Orientis (O.T.O.), a secret society led by the English occultist Aleister Crowley, where she was known as "Soror [Sister] Cassap". She joined as a teenager along with her older sister Helen. From 1941 to 1945 she had a turbulent relationship with her sister's husband John Whiteside Parsons, the head of the Pasadena O.T.O. Although she was a committed and popular member, she acquired a reputation for disruptiveness that prompted Crowley to denounce her as a "vampire." She began a relationship with L. Ron Hubbard, whom she met through the O.T.O., in 1945. She and Hubbard eloped, taking with them a substantial amount of Parsons' life savings and marrying bigamously a year later while Hubbard was still married to his first wife, Margaret Grubb.
Northrup played a significant role in the development of Dianetics, Hubbard's "modern science of mental health", between 1948 and 1951. She was Hubbard's personal auditor and along with Hubbard, one of the seven members of the Dianetics Foundation's Board of Directors. However, their marriage was deeply troubled; Hubbard was responsible for a prolonged campaign of domestic violence against her and kidnapped both her and her infant daughter. Hubbard spread allegations that she was a Communist secret agent and repeatedly denounced her to the FBI. The FBI declined to take any action, characterizing Hubbard as a "mental case". The marriage ended in 1951 and prompted lurid headlines in the Los Angeles newspapers. She subsequently married one of Hubbard's former employees, Miles Hollister, and moved to Hawaii and later Massachusetts, where she died in 1997


Early  Life of Sara Elizabeth Bruce Northrup Hollister 
Northrup was one of five children born to Olga Nelson, the daughter of a Swedish immigrant to the United States.[2] She was the granddaughter of Russian emigrant Malacon Kosadamanov (later Nelson) who emigrated to Sweden.[3] Northrup's mother first married Thomas Cowley, an Englishman working for the Standard Oil Company. The couple had three daughters. In 1923 the family moved to Pasadena, a destination said to have been chosen by Olga using a Ouija board.[2] Although she later remembered her childhood with warmth, Northrup's upbringing was marred by her sexually abusive father, who was imprisoned in 1928 for financial fraud. She was sexually active from an unusually young age and often said she lost her virginity at the age of ten.

Sara Elizabeth Bruce Northrup Hollister’s relationship with Jack Parsons
In 1933, Northrup's 22-year-old sister Helen met the 18-year-old Jack Parsons, a chemist who went on to be a noted expert in rocket propulsion. Jack Parsons was also an avid student and practitioner of the occult. Helen and Jack were engaged in July 1934[6] and married in April 1935.[2] Parsons' interest in the occult led in 1939 to him and Helen joining the Pasadena branch of the Ordo Templi Orientis (O.T.O.).
At age 15, Northrup moved in with sister Helen and her husband Jack, while she finished high school.[1] Parsons had subdivided the house, a rambling mansion next door to the estate of Adolphus Busch (which later became the first Busch Gardens), into 19 apartments which he populated with a mixture of artists, writers, scientists and occultists.[7] Her parents not only knew about her unconventional living arrangements but supported Parsons' group financially.[8]
Northrup joined the O.T.O. in 1941, at Parsons' urging, and was given the title of Soror [Sister] Cassap.[1] She soon rose to the rank of a second degree member, or "Magician", of the O.T.O.[9]
In June 1941, at the age of seventeen, she began a passionate affair with Parsons while her sister Helen was away on vacation. She made a striking impression on the other lodgers; George Pendle describes her as "feisty and untamed, proud and self-willed, she stood five foot nine, had a lithe body and blond hair, and was extremely candid."[10] When Helen returned, she found Northrup wearing Helen's own clothes and calling herself Parsons' "new wife." Such conduct was expressly permitted by the O.T.O., which followed Crowley's disdain of marriage as a "detestable institution" and accepted as commonplace the swapping of wives and partners between O.T.O. members.
Although both were committed O.T.O. members, Northrup's usurpation of Helen's role led to conflict between the two sisters. The reactions of Parsons and Helen towards Northrup were markedly different. Parsons told Helen to her face that he preferred Northrup sexually: "This is a fact that I can do nothing about. I am better suited to her temperamentally – we get on well. Your character is superior. You are a greater person. I doubt that she would face what you have with me – or support me as well."  
Helen was far less sanguine, writing in her diary of "the sore spot I carried where my heart should be", and had furious – sometimes violent – rows with both Parsons and Northrup. She began an affair with Wilfred Smith, Parsons' mentor in the O.T.O.[11] and had a son in 1943 who bore Parsons' surname but who was almost certainly fathered by Smith. Northrup also became pregnant but had an abortion on April 1, 1943, arranged by Parsons and carried out by Dr. Zachary Taylor Malaby, a prominent Pasadena doctor and Democratic politician.
Northrup's hostility towards other members of the O.T.O. caused further tensions in the house, which Aleister Crowley heard about from communications from her housemates. He dubbed her "the alley-cat" after an unnamed mutual acquaintance told him that Parsons's attraction to her was like "a yellow pup bumming around with his snout glued to the rump of an alley-cat." Concluding that she was a vampire, which he defined as "an elemental or demon in the form of a woman" who sought to "lure the Candidate to his destruction," he warned that Northrup was a grave danger to Parsons and to the "Great Work" which the O.T.O. was carrying out in California. 
Similar concerns were expressed by other O.T.O. members. The O.T.O.'s US head, Karl Germer, labeled her "an ordeal sent by the gods". Her disruptive behavior appalled Fred Gwynn, a new O.T.O. member living in the commune at 1003 South Orange Grove Avenue: "Betty went to almost fantastical lengths to disrupt the meetings [of the O.T.O.] that Jack did get together. If she could not break it up by making social engagements with key personnel she, and her gang, would go out to a bar and keep calling in asking for certain people to come to the telephone."
Sara Elizabeth Bruce Northrup Hollister’s Relationship with L. Ron Hubbard
In August 1945, Northrup met L. Ron Hubbard for the first time. He had visited 1003 South Orange Grove Avenue at the behest of Lou Goldstone, a well-known science fiction illustrator, while on leave from his service in the US Navy. Parsons took an immediate liking to Hubbard and invited him to stay in the house for the duration of his leave. Hubbard soon began an affair with Northrup after beginning "affairs with one girl after another in the house."He was a striking figure who habitually wore dark glasses and carried a cane with a silver handle, the need for which he attributed to his wartime service: as Northrup later put it, "He was not only a writer but he was the captain of a ship that had been downed in the Pacific and he was weeks on a raft and had been blinded by the sun and his back had been broken."[8] . He moved in with me about two months ago, and although Betty and I are still friendly, she has transferred her sexual affection to Ron. Hubbard became Parsons' "magical partner" for a sex magic ritual involving that was intended to summon an incarnation of a goddess.[17] Although they got on well as fellow occultists, tensions between the two men were apparent in more domestic settings. Hubbard and Northrup made no secret of their relationship; another lodger at Parsons' house described how he saw Hubbard "living off Parsons' largesse and making out with his girlfriend right in front of him. Sometimes when the two of them were sitting at the table together, the hostility was almost tangible."

L. Ron Hubbard's Lies Exposed By His Son Pt.1
https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=G2y3kNhJHE8

Scientolulz Published on Oct 10, 2010
Part 1: http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=G2y3kN... Highlights of the 1982 Clearweater Hearings day one and two. Ron DeWolf (L. Ron Hubbard Jr.) was the son of Hubbard and worked very closely with his father during the growth of Scientology in the 1950's. Watch the whole video here: http://video.google.com/videoplay?doc... http://video.google.com/videoplay?doc... Learn more about the Cult of $cientology: http://infinitecomplacency.blogspot.com/ http://www.whyweprotest.net/en/ http://theunfunnytruth.ytmnd.com/ http://xenu.net/ http://www.truthrundown.org/ http://xenutv.com/ http://www.exscientologykids.com
/

L. Ron Hubbard's Lies Exposed By His Son Pt.2
https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=juba_gNQ7LI

Scientolulz Published on Oct 10, 2010
Part 2:

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=juba_g... Highlights of the 1982 Clearweater Hearings day one and two. Ron DeWolf (L. Ron Hubbard Jr.) was the son of Hubbard and worked very closely with his father during the growth of Scientology in the 1950's. Watch the whole video here: http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=elFdBC... http://video.google.com/videoplay?doc... http://video.google.com/videoplay?doc... Learn more about the Cult of $cientology: http://infinitecomplacency.blogspot.com/ http://www.whyweprotest.net/en/ http://theunfunnytruth.ytmnd.com/ http://xenu.net/ http://www.truthrundown.org/ http://xenutv.com/ http://www.exscientologykids.com/
L. Ron Hubbard, the founder of Scientology
https://tonyortega.org/2017/11/28/ugh-we-just-found-a-troubling-l-ron-hubbard-scientology-lecture-about-little-boys-and-sex/
You have to understand something, dear reader. L. Ron Hubbard, the founder of Scientology, used to give lectures on practically a daily basis — and sometimes more than one a day — for decades. This character could talk and talk about anything for hours and hours, and his followers giggled and applauded their way through whatever he threw at them.
The sheer volume of Hubbard’s output is staggering. So forgive us if we’re only now running into a very troubling set of statements that Hubbard gave which were buried inside a lecture that was itself buried in an obscure series of talks he gave during a brief trip to London in September 1952.
Why did we stumble on this lecture now? Thanks to Leah Remini’s second season of Scientology and the Aftermath, there’s a much greater awareness and public interest in Scientology’s treatment — and mistreatment — of children. For some time now, we’ve been telling you how shocking it was to find what appears to be an outright statement endorsing pedophilia in Scientology’s most important book, Hubbard’s 1950 breakout bestseller, Dianetics. And so we’ve been on the lookout for other material about children and sex that we might have overlooked before.
That search led us to a little-discussed set of talks referred to as the “Technique 88 Supplementary Lectures” which were delivered by Hubbard to students on the “London Professional Course” over a period of four days. And the particular talk we’re focusing on was titled “The Resolution of the Second Dynamic,” the first of two lectures that he gave on Tuesday, September 23, 1952.
We’ve taken three paragraphs from that lecture in the name of Fair Use, and for help with Hubbard’s Scientology jargon — some of which is obsolete in today’s church — we turned to tech expert Sunny Pereira for help. (Sunny was one of three women featured in a stunning 2010 story by Tampa Bay Times writer Tom Tobin on forced abortion in the Sea Org, and she regularly helps us out with technical matters here at the Bunker.)
This is going to get pretty unsettling, so we’ve broken Hubbard’s three paragraphs into three short videos — it’s important, we think, for you to hear the inflections of his voice in these passages.
Here’s the first paragraph, with a transcript, and then we’ll talk to Sunny about what’s going on.

https://youtu.be/bV153p99IfA

If you were to put your preclear on an E-meter and just start naming the categories and ages of human beings, that is to say, let’s name the categories and ages,”Uh, babies, young boys, boys from 3 to 5. In other words, which would you most like to help? Boys from 3 to 5, boys from 5 to 8, boys from 8 to 12, boys from 17, up to 17, boys to 21? Young men 21 to 30?” And so on. And then you would take it on the girl line. You’re going to get a harder drop theoretically, you’re going to get a harder drop on one or the other of these. And you’ll find that is the DED. That’s the original blanketing which you need. You can actually trace it that mechanically. You don’t have to trace it that mechanically really, you just ask him for a little while and he’ll start springing tears out of him if you just start processing him on the subject of poor little boys. He really wants to help little boys. Little boys, they’re, they’re the stuff, they’re the stuff.
Sunny explains that in auditing, the auditor asks questions of the subject, a person who is known as a “preclear” because they haven’t “gone Clear” yet in their Scientology progress. The preclear holds the electrodes of an E-meter while the auditor asks questions about a series of words or phrases, watching to see which of the words the device’s needle reacts to.
In this scenario that Hubbard is laying out, the auditor is asking about age categories of boys and girls, waiting to see which one gets a reaction — a “harder drop” — on the needle.
That reaction, Hubbard says, is the DED. “That word is no longer used,” Sunny says. “It’s one of the terms LRH later tossed out and replaced because it was confusing for auditors. It was replaced by the word ‘overts.’ And another way to say it is a sin.”
Hubbard is saying that when the preclear’s needle reacts to a question about little boys it identifies the area of the preclear’s “sin,” the DED.
“It was like an early form of sec-checking,” Sunny says, referring to the intense interrogation techniques that Scientologists are put through today. “If he reacts on one of those items, there are overts — sins — connected with it.”
Hubbard then says that the auditor has found the “original blanketing” which he needs in order to uncover what that sin was. “Blanketing is a term that comes from A History of Man,” Sunny says, referring to a 1952 book by Hubbard which is one of the most bizarre in Scientology’s history. “Blanketing refers to a relationship between two people, an adult and a child in this situation. It can be a punch, a sexual advance, something that brings a return of the same reaction.” (The term was later dropped out of use by Hubbard and is not commonly known and used in Scientology today.)
However, even as the auditor is beginning to uncover some troubling sin against a child, the preclear will talk about “poor little boys” and it may result in tears.
But as we will see, that’s just a cover for what the auditor is about to discover in his subject.
Here’s the second paragraph, and things really get disturbing now, we will warn you…
https://youtu.be/yUB-rc3cNb4
And by the way, anybody who had sexual relationships with a little boy ought to be killed! The idea! Horrible! Why that’s the most disgusting thought he’s ever heard. What? Sexual relationships with a little boy? Oh, no. Except in the DED you find him taking a little boy and driving the little boy up to sexual enthusiasm, up, up, up, up, up and the little boy just can’t give any more, and so forth, and on the last jolt of demand on the part of the thetan, the little boy who actually did have a thetan in him anyhow, goes PANG. And it goes straight down to 0.0. BzzzUm. And that’s why being a body is death of a body, is thetan into the body. That’s 0.0. Death of the body is being the body. And you’ll find him having his most enjoyable times thereafter as a little boy. He, he’s doing a super life continuum for this little boy. And this little boy bit the dust and was chewed up and spat out maybe 70, 60, 30 trillion years ago.
The preclear continues to object to the very notion of sinning against a child, and suggests that anyone who has sex with a child should be killed. However, the auditor disregards what the preclear is saying now, and instead goes into the DED — the sin — using the E-meter to get the preclear to admit to what has really happened in the past.
“This is how Hubbard sees that. If someone is denouncing sex with a child today, Hubbard advises the auditor to find what makes a person say that by learning what happened to them in the past, maybe trillions of years ago. And that’s actually a pretty normal instruction for Scientology auditors up to the current day,” Sunny says.
And what is the DED, the overt, the sin, that Hubbard commands you to locate? You will find the preclear, far in the past, “driving the little boy up to sexual enthusiasm, up, up up up.”
“That means continuously using a little boy for sex, yeah. It’s pretty gross,” Sunny says.
That continues until the little boy “can’t give any more” and with a PANG, goes to 0.0 on the Tone Scale, which is “body death.”
L. Ron Hubbard, in other words, is suggesting that someone who denounces sex with children today is covering for the fact that sometime in their distant past, they sexually abused a child to death.
“Yes, that’s how I’m reading it,” Sunny says.
Hubbard then suggests that the offending preclear, as a thetan, then “becomes” the body he has killed. (In Scientology, we are each immortal beings, thetans, who temporarily inhabit physical bodies as we go through countless lifetimes over trillions of years. Scientists say the universe is only some 13.8 billion years old, but in Scientology, time is measured in quadrillions of years.)

“He’s taken over the boy’s life in his own mind, lifetime after lifetime. He’s taken on the memories of that child or children that he’s done that to,” Sunny adds.

And those are his most enjoyable memories, of being used sexually?

“Yeah. Basically, it’s a a common belief in Scientology, if you sin enough on a particular thing, you become it.”

So, after sexually abusing and killing a child or numerous children between 30 and 70 trillion years ago, the preclear somehow becomes those children through his sin, and it becomes his most “enjoyable times.”

And at this point, we must apologize to those of you who can’t believe how sick this shit is. You’re absolutely right about that. Now, on to the final paragraph…

https://youtu.be/wieZnipqqE4

And how many little boys are there on this line? Well, slap-happy and stupid, he goes on the next spiral. He says, “Ah.” As the thetan you see, he says, “Ah, a little boy. Ahhh, ha, ha.” Blanket, zap, pow! Stupid, you see? I mean he just goes through this same cycle and he keeps going through the same cycle. And right afterwards for the rest of the spiral he says, “Little boys, uuugh. The idea of sexual relationships with a little boy, how disgusting!” Now, he’ll get into the current lifetime, this fellow, with this same service facsimile. This might be the second dynamic aspect of the service facsimile, and is the heaviest one. He gets into the current lifetime, what do you find? The same drama being played off. Little boy, sexual relationships very early, key in, and here we go all over again. What? Sexual relationships with a little boy? Oh no. Yet you can find it right in this lifetime, if you look. Same way for a girl.

Still “slap-happy” over his sin, the predator then finds another little boy in a new “spiral” of time, and once again, “blankets” — commits the sin against another thetan — zaps another boy, and continues on, continuing on the next cycle, until eventually he begins to see his acts as disgusting. Still, into his current lifetime, he brings with him the “service facsimile” from that previous era.

“‘Service facsimile’ is really hard to define for outsiders. It’s an idea that a person has in their mind and they compute everything through that idea, and it doesn’t compute properly,” Sunny says.

Carrying around that idea of being a sexual predator, it can be brought to the surface again. “If he starts to have sex early (especially a childhood abuse), that spiral will ‘key in.’ Hubbard explains that even if he managed to get himself out of this trap he is in, it can start all over again,” Sunny says. And one way it manifests itself, paradoxically, is the person reacting violently against the idea of sex with children.
“He’s saying that anyone who reacts negatively to people molesting children today is going to have all of this stuff in their track [their long distant past lives] that you can find. That’s what makes them feel that way,” she says.
“Now, the indies [independent Scientologists, who have left the church but still uphold Hubbard] will say all of this is reactive, and that Hubbard describing these acts doesn’t allow anyone to sexually molest children. Indies will say that people should be able to rationally deal with these kinds of reactions from their past.”
But Hubbard is accusing anyone who denounces sex with children as having some dark secret in their past lives about killing kids sexually?
“That’s right. And like with the awful Dianetics passage about kissing 7-year-old girls, he could have used any example to make his point about covering up sin. So why is he using sex with children to make his point? It’s his own insanity that he’s talking about in this stuff.”
Sunny, thank you for wallowing through this stuff with us. We know it wasn’t easy.
And now, we expect that Hubbard’s defenders will tell us that this 1952 lecture is no longer on the “Bridge to Total Freedom,” or that we have, like with the Dianetics passage, misunderstood Hubbard’s intent.
But we ask you to listen to his words. Listen to how he describes sexually molesting and killing a child. We think you will find it as disturbing as we do.

Scientology disconnection, a reminder

Bernie Headley has not seen his daughter Stephanie in 4,947 days.
Brian Sheen has not seen his grandson Leo in 93 days.
Clarissa Adams has not seen her parents Walter and Irmin Huber in 1,156 days.
Carol Nyburg has not seen her daughter Nancy in 1,930 days.
Jamie Sorrentini Lugli has not seen her father Irving in 2,704 days.
Quailynn McDaniel has not seen her brother Sean in 2,050 days.
Claudio and Renata Lugli have not seen their son Flavio in 2,544 days.
Sara Goldberg has not seen her daughter Ashley in 1,584 days.
Lori Hodgson has not seen her son Jeremy and daughter Jessica in 1,296 days.
Marie Bilheimer has not seen her mother June in 822 days.
Joe Reaiche has not seen his daughter Alanna Masterson in 4,911 days
Derek Bloch has not seen his father Darren in 2,051 days.
Cindy Plahuta has not seen her daughter Kara in 2,371 days.
Claire Headley has not seen her mother Gen in 2,346 days.
Ramana Dienes-Browning has not seen her mother Jancis in 702 days.
Mike Rinder has not seen his son Benjamin and daughter Taryn in 5,004 days.
Brian Sheen has not seen his daughter Spring in 1,110 days.
Skip Young has not seen his daughters Megan and Alexis in 1,513 days.
Mary Kahn has not seen her son Sammy in 1,386 days.
Lois Reisdorf has not seen her son Craig in 967 days.
Phil and Willie Jones have not seen their son Mike and daughter Emily in 1,472 days.
Mary Jane Sterne has not seen her daughter Samantha in 1,716 days.
Kate Bornstein has not seen her daughter Jessica in 12,825 days.

Posted by Tony Ortega on November 28, 2017 at 07:00
E-mail tips and story ideas to tonyo94 AT gmail DOT com or follow us on Twitter. We post behind-the-scenes updates at our Facebook author page. After every new story we send out an alert to our e-mail list and our FB page.
Our book, The Unbreakable Miss Lovely: How the Church of Scientology tried to destroy Paulette Cooper, is on sale at Amazon in paperback, Kindle, and audiobook versions. We’ve posted photographs of Paulette and scenes from her life at a separate location. Reader Sookie put together a complete index. More information can also be found at the book’s dedicated page.

The Best of the Underground Bunker, 1995-2016 Just starting out here? We’ve picked out the most important stories we’ve covered here at the Undergound Bunker (2012-2016), The Village Voice (2008-2012), New Times Los Angeles (1999-2002) and the Phoenix New Times (1995-1999)
Learn about Scientology with our numerous series with experts…
BLOGGING DIANETICS: We read Scientology’s founding text cover to cover with the help of L.A. attorney and former church member Vance Woodward
UP THE BRIDGE: Claire Headley and Bruce Hines train us as Scientologists 
GETTING OUR ETHICS IN: Jefferson Hawkins explains Scientology’s system of justice 
SCIENTOLOGY MYTHBUSTING: Historian Jon Atack discusses key Scientology concepts
Other links: Shelly Miscavige, ten years gone | The Lisa McPherson story told in real time | The Cathriona White stories | The Leah Remini ‘Knowledge Reports’ | Hear audio of a Scientology excommunication | Scientology’s little day care of horrors | Whatever happened to Steve Fishman? | Felony charges for Scientology’s drug rehab scam | Why Scientology digs bomb-proof vaults in the desert | PZ Myers reads L. Ron Hubbard’s “A History of Man” | Scientology’s Master Spies | Scientology’s Private Dancer | The mystery of the richest Scientologist and his wayward sons | Scientology’s shocking mistreatment of the mentally ill | Scientology boasts about assistance from Google | The Underground Bunker’s Official Theme Song | The Underground Bunker FAQ
Our Guide to Alex Gibney’s film ‘Going Clear,’ and our pages about its principal figures…
Jason Beghe | Tom DeVocht | Sara Goldberg | Paul Haggis | Mark “Marty” Rathbun | Mike Rinder | Spanky Taylor | Hana Whitfield
Ex-Scientologists MesssageBoar
http://www.forum.exscn.net/threads/hubbard-as-a-pedophile.39730/

Hubbard as a pedophile?, FreeThePeople44Patron
I have been searching around for more information on what I heard in a YouTube video with Jon Atack and Steve Hassan. Jon talks about Hubbard raping children but I can find nothing on the net about this. Can anyone point me in the right direction?
Here is the video below. Jon talks about Hubbards pedophilia at 20:39. Truly disturbing.

https://youtu.be/VM_kWQAR0iY?t=20m39s
FreeThePeople44, Jun 13, 2015, EnthetanMaster of Disaste
I've long thought that Hubbard had a "special" relationship with Miscavige in his boyhood days in Gold.
Enthetan, Jun 13, 2015
proseccoPatron Meritorious
It depends on your definition of paedophile. Yes, he had young children as his servants denying them education, a family life, slave labour, mental and emotional abuse.
But, don't think there is any evidence that he sexually assaulted or sexually abused any children personally.
prosecco, Jun 13, 2015
RmackVan Allen Belt Sunbather
The only thing I've ever come across is LRH Jr. (Ron DeWolf) claiming he would take anything to bed; little boys, old ladies.
I know some people don't believe anything 'Nibs' said, but I wouldn't be surprised.

Rmack, Jun 13, 2015
At the 20:39 marker as mentioned in the OP, it is being said that an affidavit by "Andre Trevoygan"???? alleged that Hubbard raped a 12 year old boy in Morocco. And then goes on to say there were rumors LRH was having sex with one of his own children.
Anybody here know the correct name for the person making the Morocco allegation?
DeeAnna, Jun 13, 2015
There is this old post on ARS but I neither believe or disbelieve it:
[TABLE="class: LOFA24-rb-O, width: 695"]
[TR]
[TD="class: LOFA24-rb-R, align: left"]Jeta[/TD]
[TD="align: right"]
1/18/98[/TD]
[/TR]
[/TABLE]

From : wbar...@Starbase.NeoSoft.COM (William Barwell)
Message-ID: <69sb24$2et$1...@Starbase.NeoSoft.COM>
[OSA = Office of Special Affairs, de geheime dienst van Scientology /
Dianetics]
In article <69it6r$l08$1...@usenet88.supernews.com>, wgert <wg...@loop.com>
wrote:
> I think you are full of it - but then you've always felt great in the
> company of Erlich. Beats up his wife. Abuses his daughter. When asked

Erlich never abused his daughter.
That is a lie.
Hubbard did abuse one of his daughters. And admitted it in auditing
on the Apollo. Mary Sue Hubbard was auditing him. She stalked out
of that room and that was the end of what remained of that marriage.
This was towards the end of the Sea Org's days at sea. When the SO
beached, Hubbard stayed in Florida and MSH went to Washington.
This episode was well known to senior techs on Apollo.
Hubbard was a child abuser. This is a well known fact amongst
a few critics. It has NOT been on ARS because the daughter abused is 
still alive, and a sort of general agreement amongst critics
was that was reason enough to let this sleeping dog lie.

But since OSA operative WGert has obvious orders to accuse  others of child abuse, lies and libels, I am no longer going to sit on this. I warned WGert and Kobrin in e-mail not to push this DA or I would spill the beans.
I wa6rned RTC and OSa to let this drop or I would tell the truth about child sex abuser L. Ron Hubbard.
They were warned and chose to ignore my warnings.
OK, they, OSA, Let Gertie go on in this manner.
Fuck them.
Dennis Erlich and Henson did NOt abuse their daughters and the cult knows this and chooses to lie. Just like they lied about Kisser being a topless dancer even though their own paid PI disporved that as he admitted on 60 Minutes.
But the lies were used by OSA because this is a cult of lies and libels.
Hubbard sexually abused Diana Hubbard as a child and admitted it in auditing session to Mary Sue Hubbard.
May 60 minutes and other investigative programs hunt down those who were aboard the Apollo and get this truth before the public.
Fuck you Scientology, up the ass with a thick, red hot poker heated up in the lowest pits of hell. True evil and hate.
L. Ron Hubbard sexually abused his own daughter!
What a man!m Pope Charles, SubGenius Pope Of Houstonm Slack!
-- Jeta.
http://www.xs4all.nl/~jeta *censored* since Aug 1, 1997. ]
Little David, Jun 14, 2015
cakemakerPatron Meritorious

DeeAnna said: ↑
At the 20:39 marker as mentioned in the OP, it is being said that an affidavit by "Andre Trevoygan"???? alleged that Hubbard raped a 12 year old boy in Morocco. And then goes on to say there were rumors LRH was having sex with one of his own children.
Anybody here know the correct name for the person making the Morocco allegation?
Andre Tabayoyo
cakemaker, Jun 14, 2015

lotusautonomous rebellous
cakemaker said: ↑
Andre Tabayoyon
I've just read this affidavit by Andre Tabayoyon and didn't find anything related to ''possible'' LRH sexual abuses

http://www.xenu.net/archive/ronthenut/tabayoyo.htm
There is probably another affidavit :confused2:
lotus, Jun 14, 2015

I told you I was troubleSuspended animation
If there is proof available on this I'd want it exposed far and wide, who wouldn't?
I cannot imagine scientologists (no matter how sucked in to the cult they were) keeping it quiet though ... and certainly not after all these years.
Hubbard was a repulsive creep and I'd not trust him with my dog, but I won't buy this until I see something from more than one reputable, reliable source.
I just cannot imagine that all of his "tek people" would remain quiet and effectively protect him.
I told you I was trouble, Jun 14, 2015

Panda TermintCabal Of One
^Yup, I think the same thing.^

Panda Termint, Jun 14, 2015
lotusautonomous rebellous

I told you I was trouble said: ↑
If there is proof available on this I'd want it exposed far and wide, who wouldn't?
I cannot imagine scientologists (no matter how sucked in to the cult they were) keeping it quiet though ... and certainly not after all these years.
Hubbard was a repulsive creep and I'd not trust him with my dog, but I won't buy this until I see something from more than one reputable, reliable source.
I just cannot imagine that all of his "tek people" would remain quiet and effectively protect him.


This issue had been adressed a few times in the past and unfortunately it doesn't get any attention. Very few reply...
Omerta ?????

You know sometimes we have deep feelings...without knowing anything neither have any proof 
I am certainly not the only one...but I may tell it as I don't have any friends in the indies or freezoone to deny me my bridge to eternity...
I always thought all the ''pedophile ingredients'' were in the LRH cake. 
My thought is that I would be surprised the he didn't sexually abused any child!
(I've stated in the past i've sudied in a field related to intervention& psychology related to abused ch8ildren - I've work few years in this field and we were trained in spotting the ''ingredients''..the same as LRH favorable condition to allow sexual abuses in this case I would have reported strong suspicion based on other factual observed coexistant abuses cohabiting with a narcissic personnality) 
(there was a testimony of a +- 15 years old girl who had served for a sort of sexual pervert magical ritual (she thaught) for him... She was terrified..completely frozen in fear. Few guys , I remember, corroborated it as being true.

http://www.holysmoke.org/cos/hubbard-the-rapist-forrester.htm

Also if John Atack says so...and speak of Andre tabayoyon knowing facts...I tend to rely on their credibility.

Why wouldn't he do it ??? He had a free pass to abuse the smallest ones in locking them, being cruel, use them on post as slave work, put them in RPF prison, deprive them of sleep, love of their parents, brothers sisters, good food, right to speak, right to play, right to cry, right to be given a proper education, right to leave his fucking mindfcult cruel cult...right to be simply children....
He had built a mindfuck fake naval army of children to terrorize his adults slaves...He completely perverted them.
The pervert...
Why wouldn't he abuse them, while parents have given him dozens of their children to be his slave servant, to dress, him, to bathe him, to carry the ashtry..why ??? (not a reproach but a fact)
Moral ??? ethics ???? sens of bad and good ????
Is he the one who put his own son on drugs and hypnosis ??? Is he the one who kidnapped his baby girl to manipulate the mother ????
Nop..he had 0 sens of social and moral values
As a graduated narcicisst he had 0 compassion for children suffering, as the small meat bodies were only a mean of .....
Any child who had been sexually molested in this cult have been muzzled and was driven into fear and shame to have pulled it in..even their parents wouldn't protect them...after all..it's the guru....and they me be deprived of their eternity and be fair gamed personnaly by LRH and his personnel...wich means... destroyed.
I also wish that if one who reads have ever been sexually abused by this pervert, they feel confident we will ensure they are listen to here and that they can speak their heart and their mind, despite some people will defent their creepy pervert guru till their last day... 
Good old days on the appollo...
End of disgusted rant!
I wish if it happened we could know with testimonies!
I feel better now - I had such a tough day with pain 
TO LRH
The child protector
Last edited: Jun 14, 2015

Sara Elizabeth Bruce Northrup Hollister happy in her younger days. Born: April 8, 1924 Pasadena, California, United States - Died: December 19, 1997 (aged 73) Hadley, Massachusetts, United States.

Spouses: L. Ron Hubbard (1946–1951) and Miles Hollister (1951–1997). One child: Alexus

The paperback cost less than a dollar. But the price the author paid - both in torment and in legal fees - was immensely more.

Scientology: Fair Game?- Scientology’s founder, L. Ron Hubbard, once defined the religion as being in service of ‘a civilisation without insanity
https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=jBmwZ_OmTdI  WheelerCentre. Published on Nov 25, 2015
Scientology’s founder, L. Ron Hubbard, once defined the religion as being in service of ‘a civilisation without insanity, without criminals and without war, where the able can prosper and honest beings can have rights, and where man is free to rise to greater heights’. Almost 60 years since its foundation, though, Scientology has become a uniquely contentious phenomenon – with many questioning its status as a religion, cult or business, and with a reputation for fiercely defensive, litigious and coercive reactions to criticism. One of the first to feel the Church’s wrath was Paulette Cooper – whose 1971 book, The Scandal of Scientology, saw her become the target of an elaborate plot which set out to destroy her credibility, frame her and land her with a 15 year prison sentence. Codenamed ‘Miss Lovely’ by Church operatives, Cooper is now the subject of investigative journalist Tony Ortega’s book, The Unbreakable Miss Lovely.  
Ortega is a long-time chronicler of Scientology, and one of its leading scrutineers. Featured in Alex Gibney’s HBO documentary Going Clear, he’s the executive editor of TheLipTV and former editor-in-chief of The Village Voice. He visits Melbourne – where the world’s first inquiry into Scientology was held in 1963, and Scientology was first banned in 1965 – for a chat with Steve Cannane, who’s currently writing a book on Scientology’s history in Australia.

Ron Hubbard's "Yukon Madness" was originally published in the August 1935 issue of New Mystery Adventures

The Scandal behind "The Scandal of Scientology"
Operation Clambake presents:
Looking over my shoulder,
The Inside Account of the Story That Almost Killed Me
Saturday, June 23, 2007
By Paulette Cooper

http://www.xenu.net/archive/personal_story/paulette_cooper/

The paperback cost less than a dollar. But the price the author paid - both in torment and in legal fees - was immensely more.
The author in 1967. Little did she realize the turn her life was about to take.
"I was named a likely suspect and the next thing I knew I was called to appear before a federal grand jury in New York."
The ledge surrounding the rooftop pool of her apartment building: the perfect spot for an "accident."


By 1974, the author wears the stress of her ordeal in her pained visage.

Cooper says her life is back on track, and that she is enjoying some well-earned time away from the pandora's box she opened nearly forty years ago.
You may not believe this, but you can write something that some group doesn't approve of and then have a quarter of your life almost ruined. I know because it happened to me.
I haven't previously written about this from beginning to end because it's still painful, but here goes. In 1968 I was a struggling New York freelance writer, searching for an investigative story that would make a difference. I was already used to controversy - and publicity - when a year earlier I had successfully stowed away on an ocean liner and wrote an article (and sold movie rights) about it that had appeared all over the world.
But when I next decided to expose a then relatively unknown organization called Scientology (and the related Dianetics, ) I ended up falsely arrested and facing 15 years in jail, had 19 lawsuits filed against me all over the world by Scientology, was the almost victim of a near murder, was the subject of 5 disgusting anonymous smear letters sent to my family and neighbors about me, and endured constant and continual harassment for almost 15 years.
I had obtained a master's degree in psychology and had studied comparative religion at Harvard for a summer. So I became interested in researching a newly-popular quasi-religious mental-health cult founded by science fiction writer L Ron Hubbard. I started by writing an article exposing Scientology for the British Harper/Queen, (now Harper's Bazaar) and expanded this into a book.
In it, among other things, I stated that the crux of Scientology - their e-meter which they say acts like a lie detector - produced questionable results; that Hubbard had lied about his credentials; that Charles Manson had called himself a Scientologist; that some auditors had behaved improperly toward their "parishioners"; that some who left may have feared being blackmailed; that some defectors claimed that they had been psychologically damaged by Scientology, financially ripped-off, and/or harassed when they tried to leave or speak out.

I soon got used to telephone death threats, harassing calls - and lawsuits.

I was occasionally followed - often conspicuously as if to upset me - and people seemed to be trying to gain access to my apartment. Then, in the basement of my small building, I discovered alligator clips on my phone wires - likely the remnants of a phone tap.

Next, my cousin - who was also short and slim like me - was in my apartment alone when a man arrived with a "flower delivery" for me. When she opened the door, the intruder pulled a gun out of the flowers and put it to her temple. Fortunately, the gun jammed, misfired or was empty. The man then began to choke her, and when she pulled away and screamed, he ran off. The police said afterward that they were mystified, because there appeared to be no motive for the attack.

I quickly moved to a safer doorman building. But soon afterwards, 300 of my new neighbors received an anonymous smear letter about me, outrageously describing me as a part-time prostitute with VD!

Then, a few weeks later, I received a visit from a pompous FBI agent named Bruce Brotman. He said the spokesman for the Church of Scientology in New York, James Meisler, claimed to have received 2 anonymous bomb threats and named me as a likely suspect.

I didn't take it seriously until I was called to appear before a federal grand jury - and was shocked to learn that I was the target (suspect). I had to hire a top law firm (I chose one headed by Charles Stillman) who required a $5,000 retainer on my meager freelance income. Little did I realize that they would ultimately cost me $28,000 (like $75,000 today) and they would unsuccessfully sue me after the case was over for even more money!

Even worse, during the grand jury, the prosecutor, John D. Gordon III, told me that if this Grand Jury decided that I had sent Scientology the 2 bomb threats, I faced 5 years in jail for each letter, 5 more for perjury for denying it, and $15,000 in fines.

He showed me the letters, and I truthfully testified that I had never touched or seen them before. Then Gordon dropped the real bomb. "Then how did your fingerprint get on one of them?" he asked.

I was so shocked I think I momentarily lost consciousness because the room turned upside down. I then rightly explained that Scientology could have obtained a blank piece of paper that I had touched, and typed threats on it afterwards.

But Gordon was unconvinced. On May 9th, 1973, I was indicted on all 3 three counts by the U.S. Attorney's Office for the Southern District of New York. And 10 days later I was arrested, released on my own recognizance, and forbidden to leave the state without the court's permission.

For months, my anxiety was so terrible I could taste it in my throat. I was in a total panic. I could barely write, and my bills, especially legal ones, kept mounting. I couldn't eat. I couldn't sleep. I smoked 4 packs of cigarettes a day, popped Valium like M&Ms, and drank too much vodka.

I worried obsessively about the possibility of going to jail. And also about my career. I had been doing extremely well. I had 4 books out and I wasn't yet 30. But once these accusations came out at trial, what editor would give an assignment to a writer believed to have sent bomb threats to the people she wrote about? I had wanted to be a writer since I was 8 years old, and my dream life was about to be over.

I was also very concerned about my parents. They had adopted me from an orphanage in Belgium when I was 6, and I had always tried to make them proud of me. However, I knew they would soon be humiliated when the trial started.

The sexual revolution was going on then, and young people were also experimenting with pot, considering horrifying by adults (and jurors no doubt!) in those days. As a single photogenic woman involved in a bizarre case, I knew I would become the scandal du jour for the tabloids during the anticipated 3-week trial.

I tried desperately to prevent a trial. I made a writing barter arrangement with a private investigator, Anthony Pellicano - the same one in jail and in the news now - who I wanted to look into L Ron Hubbard Jr., the son of the founder, who I had worked with against his father but whom I now began to suspect had turned. But Pellicano did nothing.

I also volunteered to take lie-detector tests to prove my innocence. But they returned contradictory and inconclusive results, although not surprisingly, they did show me to be highly stressed.

My state of mind got worse when the man I had been dating for a year and planned to marry, a lawyer named Bob Straus, left me. Most of my friends also stopped calling because I was so obsessed with the horrors that were happening that it was all I could talk (or think) about.

On July 26th on my 30th birthday, I decided to end it. Fortunately, an editor friend at the New York Times stuck by me and called me. She kept me on the phone for hours to stop me from continuing to take the entire bottle of Valium I admitted that I had started to take that evening.

Another loyal friend was a new one, a short smiling redhead named Jerry Levin. He was sympathetic to what was going on and moved in with me late that summer. Since I was too depressed to go out much, he did my errands and walked my dog Tiki while I compulsively watched the Watergate hearings.

Occasionally, he would persuade me to go up to the rooftop pool with him at night when no one was there. He was a gutsy guy, and he would leap up to the 33-story high ledge and try to get me to join him. "You have to be brave if you're going to take on those bastards," he'd say. But I huddled below, a shadow of my former adventurous self.

Toward the beginning of September, I was in such a bad state that I even became slightly suspicious of him. When I questioned him, he turned on me, berating me for not even being able to trust my closest friend any more. Then he too walked out of my life, leaving me alone to face the trial.

The court date, October 31, 1973, was approaching when, a Professor and researcher from Scotland, Dr. Roy Wallis, came to interview me. Earlier, he had interviewed L Ron Hubbard Jr.

Boastfully, Jr. gave Roy a letter he wrote to his father, saying he could "bring the enemy to their [sic] knees" - and he had suddenly purchased an expensive house right after I was indicted although he had been broke. Roy brought this and other information he had gathered on Scientology's dirty tricks to Gordon, who had a growing file I had also given him on Scientology's "fair game law": That stated that an "enemy" of Scientology - such as me - "May be injured by any means by any Scientologist. May be tricked, sued or lied to or destroyed."

But no prosecutor wants to give up a high publicity case. So I started searching for a doctor to give me a truth-serum test. After months of barely eating, I had gone down to only 83 pounds, and my health had deteriorated from the stress. Doctors refused me, saying I could die from the anesthesia. But I didn't care. I had decided to kill myself right before the trial rather than humiliate my parents (and myself) once the news stories came out.

Finally, a neurologist, Dr. David Coddon of Mount Sinai Hospital, agreed, and after several hours of questioning me while I was out, he was so convinced I was innocent, that he said not only would he testify for me, but he would chain himself to the courthouse steps if they proceeded with this case. (Just what I needed; more publicity!)

On Halloween day, 1973, the government postponed - and ultimately canceled - the trial, agreeing to file a nolle prosequi. I went into therapy for a year, and the depression lifted somewhat. But the threat of a trial and scandalous publicity remained over my head, because the government could still try me, and the press could still discover that I had been arrested for sending bomb threats and ruin me.

So for four long years, I was bitter - and broke - feeling that everything I had done was right and it had all come out so wrong. Strangers from all over the world continued to call me for help on Scientology, unaware of what I had just gone though. Since no one else was doing anything or speaking out against them, I continued to try to help Scientology's many victims (free), including those they were suing or who were suing them, and those who had lost their families and their money to them.

So the Scientologists therefore kept suing following and harassing me. As one example, when they found out I had seen a shrink, they broke into his offices and stole my records to find out what I had said during therapy - then sent excerpts of negative things I had said about my friends and parents to them. Nice, eh?

In July of 1977 I was flying home from Africa on a travel writing assignment when I picked up a copy of the Herald Tribune on the plane and couldn't believe the headline Washington Post story they had picked up: it was about me.

It seems the FBI had raided 3 Scientology offices and seized their internal memos after learning that they were engaged in a variety of criminal activities. And that included framing a writer who had exposed them and was working against them: me.
I was so happy; I thought that last I would be able to prove my innocence when I came home, which had become an obsession with me. But it took me four more frustrating years (during which time they harassed me more than ever, set me up with private investigators, and continued to sue me for nonsense, for example, for that Washington Post story, saying I had given it to them) before I at last saw those documents.
And then I spent 3 months in Washington D.C., reading all the nasty stuff they had done not only to me but to anyone who had ever said or done anything against Scientology. As I later told Mike Wallace when I was on 60 Minutes discussing the frame-up and their "dirty trick" papers: "Scientology turned out to be worse than anything I ever said or even imagined.
For example, one series of documents dated 1976 was a plot of theirs against me called "Operation Freakout." to get me "incarcerated in a mental institution or jail or at least to hit her so hard that she drops her attacks" on Scientology. It seems that after the first frame-up - a plot they apparently called "Operation Dynamite" - had failed to imprison (or silence) me, they plotted again to make it look like I was making bomb threats against them and others with fake threats sounding eerily like the '72 ones.
Mysteriously, there was also an anonymous diary someone wrote of what I did each day during the "frame-up" period, and how close I was to suicide. "Wouldn't that be great for Scientology?" the person wrote

And then I realized the writer could only have been Jerry Levin. He must have been a Scientologist whom they sent to spy on me and help Scientology set me up. He and his friends, Paula Tyler and a woman calling herself Margie Shepherd (who may be Linda Kramer from Boston, who married and may be Linda Kobern), had been in and out of my old apartment back when the threats were sent. And they had access to paper on which Scientology could have obtained my fingerprint and then typed the threats.

Even now I still wonder: why did Jerry want me to go up on that ledge with him? If he had pushed me over, everyone would have simply assumed that in my depressed state of mind, and rather than face a trial, I had committed suicide. Operation Freakout indeed.

A new grand jury in New York spent 3 years investigating my frame-up. Alas, the case went nowhere because the Scientologists refused to talk about what they knew about the frame-up. One, a Charles Batdorf, was even jailed for months for refusal to speak but still wouldn't talk.

But a simultaneous Washington, D.C., grand jury (and trial) ultimately jailed 11 Scientologists who were involved in wiretapping, infiltration and theft of government documents. Some had also been involved in the frame-up and harassment of me so I finally had some justice. I also initiated my own legal actions against Scientology while they piled on more suits, spies and harassment against me. Finally, in 1985, we reached an "amicable" settlement of all lawsuits.

Indirectly, through the lawyer who handled this settlement, I became reacquainted with Paul Noble, a New York TV producer, whom I had dated in my 20's, long before this all happened and we have been very happily married for 19 years now. I went on to write 11 more books, win 6 writing awards (including two for "The Scandal of Scientology,") do some travel writing, and have a newspaper column on pets. True, it's not as "glamorous" as the investigative reporting I did with Scientology, but at least dogs don't harass and cats don't sue.

I also quit smoking, barely drink, and try to forget what happened. Try. But when I see the news, or my e-mail, I'm often reminded of the years of torment I endured. Whenever I hear about litigation,or depositions, I remember the years (and money) I spent fighting the 19 lawsuits they filed against me from all over the world that I had to defend - not to mention that I was subjected to 50 days of depositions.

Or I read about something like prosecutor Nifong's going after the innocent Duke soccer players and I am reminded of what it was like for an innocent person to be prosecuted. Me. Or someone will send me inside information from a higher-up who left, like the affidavit from Margie Wakefield swearing that: "The second murder that I heard planned was of Paulette Cooper, who had written a book critical of Scientology, and they were planning to shoot her"

Other names keep bringing me back as well. My useless private investigator, Anthony Pellicano, is all over the news. My former attorney Charles Stillman often defends high-publicity clients. like the Reverend Moon. Bob Straus, the boyfriend who left me, went on to head a large New York organization that investigates judges. John D. Gordon III is with the high profile law firm of Morgan Lewis.

Bruce Brotman retired from the FBI and I was pleased to read negative news stories that appeared about him. It seems he left the FBI and became head of security at a big-city Airport and the local papers reported that he was fired when he refused to go through the security system, reportedly saying, "I make the rules."

Dr. Roy Wallis committed suicide in 1990, blowing his brains out when his wife left him. Dr. David Coddon died in 2002. And while I've never heard further of James Meisler or Charles Batdorf, I heard that Jerry Levin - which I'm sure was not his real name - is still a Scientologist.

Yes, I often wish I had never ever heard the word "Scientology," But despite all that happened, I would still have done the same today, because no one else was speaking out or working to expose them then. I would not have been capable of remaining quiet because I learned too many scary things and talked to too many people who were being hurt to turn my back on them.
Nowadays, thanks to the Internet, others are speaking out. And fortunately Scientology is not as litigious or vicious toward their critics. But if you think there's nothing bad happening to (former) members and/or critics, go read www.clambake.org (especially the message boards), www.lermanet.com, xenu.net, xenutv,com &.holysmoke.org for starters.
Sometimes I get discouraged because Scientology gets so much publicity from people like Tom Cruise, John Travolta, etc. And I wonder whether it was worth wrecking so many years of my life when they're so powerful again. But then I remind myself that I did help a lot of people. My book sold 154,000 copies - not that I ever saw any money from it and it cost me a fortune - and what I called "The Book That Launched a Thousand Suits" is really "The Book they Couldn't Kill," since it's still read today (free) on the Internet - in several languages.
Finally, some of the people who read my book (or the story of what they did to me which is also on the Internet,) e-mail me from all over the world to thank me, and that gives me satisfaction. My favorite was the man in his 50's who e-mailed me to say that years ago, after learning the truth about Scientology from me, he left the cult, married, has 4 children (2 are twins) and now runs a computer company employing 40+ people. He wrote to tell me that he feels that I am responsible for his happiness.
That reminded me of why I did what I did, and why we journalists do what we do: we try to tell the truth so that we can help others.

Unfortunately, we sometimes pay a terrible price for it.

​Scientology The Cult of Greed

Barbara Klowden Snader, aka Barbara Kaye - L Ron Hubbard's PR Assistant & Lover - Secret Lives

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=hicxJSg0ygY

Keeping.Skepticism.Working
Published on Jan 24, 2015
Barbara Klowden Snader, aka Barbara Kaye - L Ron Hubbard's PR Assistant & Lover - Secret Lives - Scientology - Dianetics. Ron was still married to Sara Northrup, "the second wife he didn't have" This video is uploaded with the intent of educating the public regarding Scientology and its belief structure and to help preserve the tech for future generations. Uploaded in the spirit of Fair Use Copyright Act of 1976, 17 U.S.C. § 107. All credit for the video goes to its original creator. 

Scientology Roots Chapter Nine – L. Ron Hubbard’s Lifelong Intelligence Career
http://www.awn.bz/Ron_Hubbard_GroomedByMI6.html​


http://www.wikipediaexposed.org/wikipediaexposed_featurenewsstories_p.1.html


The British nobility has been working on a Grand Plan to make themselves the ruthless ruler of the entire world.
The rest of humanity does not agree to their idea that the British nobility should rule the world. They do not want to be obedient subjects, servants and slaves who live under the boot and say-so of the British aristocracy. Most men want to live as free men who live under their own will and say-so.
Thus the British slavemasters conducted mental and spiritual research. Their real interest in studying the human mind and spirit was to learn how to control men, so they could modify his behavior into what they want all men to be – willing subjects under rule by the British nobility.
​The Cecil family is one of the top British slavemaster families. Their family has been the head of British intelligence for over 400 years. Robert Cecil was the leader of an influential family called the Cecil Bloc. He was the head of British intelligence and he was a British Prime Minister.                                                             
Robert Arthur Talbot Gascoyne-Cecil (Lord Salisbury)
One of his sisters had a son named Arthur Balfour. He was in the Cecil family and he was also a head of British intelligence and a Prime Minister of Britain.  
Arthur J. Balfou
Where Is Shelly Miscavige? New Details About Scientology Leader David Miscavige's Wife Who Hasn't Been Seen Publicly In Years
https://www.yourtango.com/2019321597/where-shelly-miscavige-new-details-missing-scientology-leader-wife
Entertainment And News February 12, 2019, Contributor Sarah Gangraw
Leah Remini EXPOSES Scientology  https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=R6oYaMtJln0   2,229,021 views Ken Ammi Published on Nov 1, 2015


November 8th, 2017- McClaughry
It was on June 11, 1940 that William Stephenson arrived in New York to start the British Security Coordination to get America into the war – WWII. He arrived aboard the SS Britannic with John Arthur Reed Pepper (his SIS man) and family in tow.
The first order of business was getting a “control” point for Secret Intelligence work. Someone who was fully aboard the British agenda and more importantly, would do whatever the British told him to do. Vincent Astor, with numerous familial connections into British high society, was chosen to hold that function while a more permanent arrangement was being worked on. (the COI, then the OSS).
Every step of the way was controlled by the British.

Psychopaths in our midst — what you should know
What does the emerging neuroscience of psychopathy tell us about how we should deal with it?


http://inlnews.com/USA_Past-Present_Future1.html  

By Pascal Wallisch, PhD     Posted on 17 November 2014

The most importantthing to know is that they exist.  Psychopaths are out there – ready, willing and able to take advantage of you without giving it a second thought, even if it were to ruin your life. Indeed, some psychopaths would consider it an added bonus if it did. Worse, you are unlikely to know what you are dealing with because you don't know what to look out for.
This is partly the fault of the media and the way psychopaths are represented in popular culture. The term "psychopath" likely evokes a vivid image of real or fictional characters like Charles Manson or Hannibal Lecter. When pressed for a definition, many people would consider someone who is a sadistic serial killer and criminal mastermind with a deranged and twisted mind who also takes pleasure in the suffering he inflicts as the prototype that defines the condition.
One implication of this definition is that psychopaths must be exceedingly rare and not really something to worry about in everyday life. This is perhaps comforting, but just like real drowning looks nothing like drowning on the big screen, popular imagination harbors a lot of misconceptions when it comes to psychopaths. To make matters worse, psychopaths deliberately work on maintaining a "mask of sanity." They know they have to conceal their nature in order to more effectively manipulate and exploit you, which is why most victims of psychopaths are blindsided by psychopathic behavior.
Fortunately, science made a lot of progress in understanding and detecting psychopaths in the past century.

What psychopathy is – and what it's not
Elsevier Connect Contributor

Dr. Wallisch is the author of MATLAB for Neuroscientists, 2nd Edition, published by Elsevier. The text serves as the only comprehensive study manual and teaching resource for MATLAB, the globally accepted standard for scientific computing, in the neurosciences and psychology.
Book signing at Neuroscience 2014
Dr. Pascal Wallisch will be signing the second edition of MATLAB for Neuroscientists from 11:30 am to 1 pm today in Elsevier booth #115 at the Society for Neuroscience annual meeting (#SfN14) in Washington, DC.

The first thing to understand about psychopaths is that the condition is ironically named. The term literally translates to "suffering souls," but while psychopathy objectively does tend to cause a lot of difficulties and strife in the lives of psychopaths, they are unlikely to be distressed by this. Instead, they are generally the ones who are dishing out the suffering, and are doing so without losing much sleep over it. Unlike most mental or neurological diseases, it is not really accurate to say that psychopaths are "suffering" from psychopathy. Generally, they are not actually suffering – rather they make others suffer for their sins. This is why psychopaths don't typically seek treatment for their condition. Psychopaths are usually only diagnosed if and when their behavior is so far outside of the bounds of societal norms that they end up in prison, which about two-thirds of them eventually do. This makes it hard to estimate the prevalence of psychopathy, but experts estimate that between one in 100 to 200 males – the condition seems to be more rare in females – would qualify for a diagnosis of psychopathy if they were evaluated. This rate implies that they are common enough to worry about because you are likely to know a few of them personally, whether you recognize that they are psychopaths or not. Crucially, they cause far more than their fair share of suffering.

So it is critical to understand what psychopathy is and is not. Importantly, while the terms sound similar – and screenwriters like to conflate the condition for dramatic effect – psychopathy has nothing to do with psychosis. Psychopaths generally do not suffer from hallucinations, are not acting in ways that are patently irrational, nor are they out of touch with physical reality.

Traits of psychopaths – and what it's like to be one

What seems to be central to the condition is a dramatically muted emotional affect. While there is controversy in the field about how this manifests specifically, the signs of disordered affect are everywhere. For instance, some studies show that psychopaths do not exhibit normal physiological responses (e.g., increase in sweat or change in heart rate) when looking at disturbing images of atrocities. Some experts maintain that it is next to impossible to startle a psychopath or win a staring contest with one.

The problem with this lack of normal emotional affect is that most of us use it to guide our social behavior. We need emotions like empathy or guilt in order to develop a moral compass, to distinguish what is right from wrong when it comes to treating others. Indeed, psychopaths don't seem to be big on compassion or regret. Studies show that when asked to assess what feels more wrong – kicking a baby or kicking a sack of rice – psychopaths tend to treat either scenario with an equal degree of equanimity.

Of course, this is inconceivable to most of us. Generally speaking, most people expect others to feel and act more or less as they themselves would. However, in the case of psychopaths, this heuristic fails; non-psychopaths can hardly conceive ever doing anything remotely like the things that psychopaths do all the time without any qualms whatsoever.

A metaphor that can help to grasp what it feels like to be a psychopath might be to consider how you would feel about spilling milk. It's unfortunate, but nothing to cry over. And of course one has to break a couple of eggs to make an omelet – that is just how things are. Psychopaths treat people like you would treat objects – things to be manipulated for their personal gain with no conceivable ethical or moral dimension.


As a consequence, the psychopath exhibits a profound indifference to the suffering his actions cause others.

The implications of such a condition are predictably dramatic; freed from the ethical shackles imposed on behavior by conscience, the psychopath pursues his antisocial agenda of personal gain with abandon, uninhibited and untroubled.

This, in turn, leads to a wide variety of behavioral tendencies that can be captured by the tests experts use to diagnose psychopathy in individuals. These sound a lot like blood tests (e.g., PCL-R, which stands for Psychopathy Checklist - Revised), but actually check behavioral traits such as lack of responsibility and remorse, pathological lying, manipulativeness and cunning, sexual promiscuity, impulsivity and irresponsibility, superficial affect and charm, criminal behavior and so on.

While the behavioral manifestations of the psychopathic lifestyle can be bewilderingly diverse, they are all consistent with a disturbed emotional affect as the root cause. Neuroimaging studies suggest that this is indeed the case, as psychopaths show dramatic anatomical and functional differences – relative to
controls – particularly in brain regions that together form the paralimbic system, which has been associated with and implicated in emotional processing.

So while psychopathy is classically considered as a personality disorder, it really is a brain disorder, specifically a disorder of emotional circuitry that deals with interpersonal relations. As such, it fits with a number of other conditions that we now recognize as biological in nature, but are manifesting socially or behaviorally.

Sociopath vs. psychopath

This dual nature poses a challenge for society. It also clarifies a common confusion regarding the difference between sociopaths and psychopaths. While some use these words interchangeably, "sociopath" is an ideological term that became fashionable in the 1970s, and which implies that this condition is mostly or even solely determined by dysfunctional social conditions. In light of the evidence that psychopathy involves clearly specified neural systems, which suggests that the condition is biological at its core, there really might be no such thing as a sociopath. Psychopathy appears increasingly less as a character flaw and more like a brain defect.

Nature vs. nurture


Of course, the question whether psychopaths are born or made is very much unresolved, as the etiology of the condition is still unclear. Most likely, it involves a combination of both genetic and social factors. On the one hand, it is increasingly apparent that signs of psychopathy – both behavioral and neural – can already be present very early in childhood, suggesting that there might be a strong genetic component to the condition. On the other hand, there is plenty of evidence that environmental factors also play a role. For instance, an uninvolved or absent father or physical neglect in childhood are strong predictors of psychopathic traits in adulthood. It is even hard to tease apart genetic and environmental components. For instance, in the example above, it is conceivable that uninvolved fathers are uninvolved because they are psychopaths as well. Obviously, it is ethically unthinkable to do experiments to resolve this question conclusively. As is usually true for complex neural-psycho-social conditions, it is likely the case that a combination of genetic predispositions and environmental triggers underlies the development of adult psychopathy.

How should society deal with psychopaths?
But regardless of cause, plenty of psychopaths exist right now and we have to deal with them, both as a society and individually.

It is perhaps not surprising that the psychopathic lifestyle eventually leads most psychopaths to prison. However, societal notions of justice were conceived in a time before we understood anything about brain disorders, so they are still not well suited to address them. For instance, the criminal justice system does presume that people can tell right from wrong and are equal before the law. 

But what if psychopaths don't - or can't - care about what is right and wrong and what if the brains of psychopaths are demonstrably different from those of the rest of the population? 


The current default societal response to psychopathy – imprisonment – seems a bit naïve, as it does not suit the peculiarities of the condition. 

While going to prison is a deeply traumatic experience for most, all accounts suggest that psychopaths don't seem to be particularly bothered by the occasion. Worse, it seems to have no curative effect – statistically, psychopaths have a probability to re-offend that approaches certainty.

Given their mental makeup, this is not surprising. To summarize, prison seems to have no deterrent, punitive or curative effect on psychopaths, which is why it can be considered woefully inadequate as a treatment option. 

This is another irony of psychopathy – those who are most likely to end up in prison are least likely to be affected by it.

Whether psychopaths can be reformed at all is an open question. Apart from prison, traditional forms of therapy are neither sought by psychopaths, nor is there any evidence that they work. However, there are promising new intervention models that go beyond punishment; for instance, "decompression" that seek to re-form the kinds of psychosocial bonds that the psychopath never made in his childhood. The jury on whether these interventions work in the long term is still out, but we – as a society – need to start taking psychopathy and its underlying brain pathology seriously. Psychopaths can inflict quite a bit of suffering on their path to prison; the annual economic damage in the US alone is estimated to be in the hundreds of billions of dollars.

Also, there is the case of the "successful psychopath" that does not end up in prison. If a psychopath is skilled enough to avoid this fate, he can utilize his natural ruthlessness to single-mindedly go after and achieve his self-aggrandizing goals. While it is not true that – as the characteristically hyperbolic media narrative would have it – 10 percent of Wall Street executives qualify as psychopaths, there is no question that psychopaths are overrepresented in leading positions in many fields. Power and recklessness is a toxic mix, and the fallout from that combination makes for riveting narratives that sell newspapers on a daily basis.

Society will have to come to terms with this one way or the other, as it is getting ever more vulnerable to psychopaths. 

In a way, it is a great time to be a psychopath, as society is ever more fractured which allows for reputation management and the emergence of a sharing economy (Craigslist, AirBnB, et al) critically relies on trust but provides ideal hunting grounds for psychopaths to exploit unsuspecting victims.

Maybe part of the solution is more research; the science of psychopathy is only now coming into its own as the condition has been understudied for a long time. Perhaps this is not surprising, given that the disorder is inherently paradoxical in nature. Most cultures sharply distinguish the archetypes of victims – who are deserving of our sympathy and compassion – from perpetrators, who are only deserving of our scorn and punishment. But what if there is a condition – psychopathy – where unsuffering victims are remorseless perpetrators that cause a lot of suffering at the same time? Society might ultimately be unsympathetic, but needs a better understanding of psychopathy for sheer self-protection.

As neuroscience progresses, society will increasingly have to come to grips with biological disorders that affect the brain and but manifest socially and behaviorally. In the case of psychopathy, it does so in an extremely detrimental and antisocial fashion. Our institutions and legal theory will have to catch up with our scientific understanding of these conditions and disorders.

How can you protect yourself?

Meanwhile, what can you do as an individual?

Most importantly, awareness of the condition is helpful, as detection is critical. The psychopath next door is unlikely to be a chainsaw-wielding killer – given the psychopathic propensity to cloak their tendencies – but can do a lot of damage to your life all the same. If you consider a normal emotional response central to the human experience, it is critical to understand that there are extremely cold-blooded aliens in human form among us.

There needs to be no value judgment attached to this – think of psychopathy as the moral equivalent of color blindness. While you might not be able to relate to psychopaths, you can still adapt your behavior. And as dealing with a psychopath can be life ruining, the only way to win might be not to play. Unless you happen to be the bigger psychopath.
  

Pascal Wallisch, PhD
Dr. Wallisch is the author of MATLAB for Neuroscientists, 2nd Edition, published by Elsevier. The text serves as the only comprehensive study manual and teaching resource for MATLAB, the globally accepted standard for scientific computing, in the neurosciences and psychology.

Dr. Pascal Wallisch(@Pascallisch) received his PhD from the University of Chicago, did postdoctoral research at the Center for Neural Science at New York University, and currently serves as Clinical Assistant Professor of Psychology at NYU. His research interests are at the intersection of psychology and neuroscience, specifically cognitive and computational neuroscience. His work focuses on motion perception, autism and the appraisal of film.

Scientist Frank Olson was drugged with LSD and 'murdered by CIA'
Frank Olson’s family sues CIA, decades after scientist’s mysterious death
Sons say spy agency killed researcher after he unwittingky took LSD in 1953

http://www.nbcnews.com/id/50003125/ns/technology_and_science-science/t/family-sues-cia-decades-after-scientists-mysterious-death/#.XKH2HJhKiUk
By Frederic J. Frommer
AP Associated Press 28th November 2012

A declassified document describing MK-ULTRA

Biochemist Frank Olson, shown here in a 1952 file picture, died in 1953 after falling from a hotel window in Manhattan. Olson's family is suing the federal government over his death.

Frank Olson, American bacteriologist
Frank Rudolph Olson was an American bacteriologist, biological warfare scientist, and Central Intelligence Agency employee who worked at Camp Detrick in Maryland

November 28, 1953, Manhattan, New York City, New York, United States

By Raf Sanchez, New York

8:33PM GMT 28 Nov 2012

Scientist Frank Olson was drugged with LSD and 'murdered by CIA'
A US government scientist was drugged by CIA agents and then thrown to his death from the 13th floor of a Manhattan hotel after he learned about secret torture sites in Europe, according to a lawsuit filed by his family.

WASHINGTON — The sons of a Cold War scientist who plunged to his death in 1953 several days after unwittingly taking LSD in a CIA mind-control experiment sued the federal government Wednesday. They claimed that the CIA murdered their father, Frank Olson, by pushing him from a 13th-story window of a hotel — not, as the CIA says, that he jumped to his death.

Sons Eric and Nils Olson of Frederick, Md., sought unspecified compensatory damages in the lawsuit filed in federal court, but their lawyer, Scott D. Gilbert, said they also want to see a broad range of documents related to Olson's death and other matters that they say the CIA has withheld from them since the death.

Olson was a bioweapons expert at Fort Detrick, the Army's biological weapons research center in Maryland. Their lawsuit claims the CIA killed Olson when he developed misgivings after witnessing extreme interrogations in which they allege the CIA committed murder using biological agents Olson had developed.

The CIA had a program in the 1950s and '60s called MK-ULTRA, which involved brainwashing and administering experimental drugs like LSD to unsuspecting individuals. The project was investigated by Congress in the 1970s.

Olson consumed a drink laced with LSD by CIA agents on Nov. 19, 1953, the suit says. Later that month, after being taken to New York City purportedly for a "psychiatric" consultation, Olson plunged to his death.

At the time — when Eric and Nils Olson were 9 and 5 years old, respectively — the CIA said he died in an accident and did not divulge to his family that Olsen had been given LSD.
But in 1975, a commission headed by Vice President Nelson Rockefeller released a report on CIA abuses that included a reference to an Army scientist who had jumped from a New York hotel days after being slipped LSD in 1953. Family members threatened to sue, but President Gerald Ford invited the family to the White House, assuring them they would be given all the government's information. CIA Director William Colby handed over documents and the family accepted a $750,000 settlement to avert a lawsuit.

In an email, CIA spokeswoman Jennifer Youngblood said that while the agency doesn't comment on matters before U.S. courts, "CIA activities related to MK-ULTRA have been thoroughly investigated over the years, and the agency cooperated with each of those investigations." She noted that tens of thousands of pages related to the program have been released to the public.
In a statement, Eric Olson said that the CIA has not given a complete picture of what happened to his father.

"The evidence shows that our father was killed in their custody," he said. "They have lied to us ever since, withholding documents and information, and changing their story when convenient."
A declassified document describing MK-ULTRA

https://www.telegraph.co.uk/news/worldnews/northamerica/usa/9710121/Scientist-Frank-Olson-was-drugged-with-LSD-and-murdered-by-CIA.html

Eric Olson composes his thoughts Thursday, Aug. 8, 2002,  during a news conference at his house in Braddock Heights, Md. concerning the death of his father

,Fort Detrick scientist Frank Olson 

The sons of Dr Frank Olson claim that their father was murdered in 1953 after he discovered that his biological research was being used to torture and kill suspects in Norway and West Germany.
After raising concerns about the killings, Dr Olson was allegedly given LSD in a glass of brandy and then executed by the CIA, triggering what his family claims is "a multi-decade cover-up that continues to this day".
The scientist began working with the spy agency in the 1950s and focused on biological weapons that could be transmitted through the air.

According to the lawsuit, filed Wednesday in Washington DC, he traveled to research sites in Norway, France and West Germany as well as Porton Down, a British government facility in Wiltshire.
During his travels in Europe he "witnessed extreme interrogations in which the CIA committed murder using biological agents that Dr Olson had developed".


Related Articles

Petraeus in shock resignation from CIA as FBI probe reveals affair 

09 Nov 2012  Early CIA report blamed militants for Benghazi attack 

19 Oct 2012  British extremist 'behind attack on CIA base in Afghanistan' 

11 Nov 2012
The lawsuit gives no details about the reported deaths in Europe and the Ministry of Defence would not comment on Dr Olson's activities in Britain.
A MoD spokesman said that Porton Down had been used to develop countermeasures to biological weapons and "part of this work included ongoing collaboration with our international allies, including the US".

Dr Olson was apparently shaken by what he had seen and returned to the US resigned to resolve from the agency. On November 19, 1953 he was taken to a secret meeting Deep Creek Lake, Maryland, where he was given LSD hidden in a glass of brandy.

Days later he was brought to New York for "psychiatric treatment" by CIA officials who allegedly told his family that he had become unstable and violent.

At 2.30am on November 28, Dr Olson went through the window of the Statler Hotel's room 1018a, which he was allegedly sharing with a CIA doctor, and died in the street below.

The CIA initially claimed his death was an accident but in the 1970s, as its activities were investigated in the wake of the Watergate scandal, it admitted that he had been drugged and said that his death was a suicide.

Dr Olson's family was paid a settlement and invited to the White House by President Gerald Ford, who apologised for the government's concealment of the drugging.
However, the family remained unsatisfied with the government's account and in 1996 exhumed Dr Olson's body and claimed to have found evidence of a blow to the head suffered before his fall.
Prosecutors in New York re-opened an investigation and although they were unable to turn up new evidence decided to change Dr Olson's cause of death from "suicide" to "unknown".

The family are now suing the government, claiming that the CIA is continuing to conceal files relating to their father's death.
“The evidence shows that our father was killed in their custody. They have lied to us ever since, withholding documents and information, and changing their story when convenient," said Eric Olson.

A CIA spokeswoman said that its covert programmes of the 1950s had been "thoroughly investigated" and that "tens of thousands of pages related to the program have been declassified and released to the public.”
Eric Olson composes his thoughts Thursday, Aug. 8, 2002, during a news conference at his house in Braddock Heights, Md. concerning the death of his father, Fort Detrick scientist Frank Olson Photo: AP
Scientist Frank Olson was drugged with LSD and 'murdered by CIA'
A US government scientist was drugged by CIA agents and then thrown to his death from the 13th floor of a Manhattan hotel after he learned about secret torture sites in Europe, according to a lawsuit filed by his family.

In Netflix's 'Wormwood', the CIA Murders Frank Olson With LSD

https://www.inverse.com/article/35958-frank-olson-wormood-netflix-cia-mk-ultra

In 1953, the United States government told the family of scientist Frank Olson that their patriarch had fallen from a hotel window to his death, a tragic suicide induced by work stress. Twenty-two years later, the CIA was forced to admit that its agents had given Olson a glass of Cointreau spiked with LSD immediately before dying, and his death was reclassified as a drug-induced suicide.

The Olson family, however, doesn’t believe this summary of events. They believe that the CIA was guilty of murder.

These real events make up the plot of Wormwood, an upcoming six-part series on Netflix that blends narrative and documentary filmmaking, directed by Errol Morris. In the first trailer for Wormwood, released Monday, the series is described as a telling of the “true story of the CIA, LSD, mind control, and the death of a family man.”

In Wormwood, Peter Sarsgaard plays Olson, a bioweapons expert who worked within a special operations division of the Army’s Biological Laboratory, which worked closely with the CIA. Olson’s family says that in 1953, he went on a work trip to Europe to visit biological and chemical weapon research facilities, where he allegedly witnessed CIA-backed interrogations that used biological agents to coerce subjects, which he found intensely disturbing.

Shortly after, Olson attended a work retreat in Deep Creek Lake, Maryland, where CIA officials, including the head of MK-ULTRA, Dr. Sidney Gottlieb, were in attendance. In 1975, the American public discovered that MK-ULTRA was a secret CIA project that, between 1953 and 1964, conducted unethical experiments on unknowing subjects with the goal of achieving mind control. Many of these tests included administering LSD on unsuspecting civilians, which the CIA later acknowledged “made little scientific sense.”

It was in Deep Creek Lake that Olson became one of the unsuspecting victims of MK-ULTRA. There, CIA agents secretly slipped LSD into his drink, as a scene in Wormwood’s trailer shows. Olson was told, 20 minutes after the fact, that his drink had been laced, and then he left the retreat in an agitated state. On November 24, he told a colleague and his wife that he planned to resign. But before that could happen, the CIA forced him to attend a “psychiatric evaluation” four days later. On November 28, he was found on the sidewalk after emerging from the window of the Statler Hotel in New York.

A declassified document describing MK-ULTRA

In 1975, the Washington Post revealed that a federally commissioned investigation into the situation found that “a civilian employee of the Department of the Army unwittingly took LSD as part of a Central Intelligence Agency test.” During a joint hearing on MK-ULTRA conducted in 1977, Senator Edward Kennedy acknowledged that “At least one death, that of Dr. Olson, resulted from these activities.”

Olson’s family has cried murder ever since. In 2012, they filed a lawsuit accusing the CIA of a cover-up, but in 2013 the case was dismissed because it was filed too late after the event took place. U.S. District Judge James Boasberg, however, did acknowledge that “the public record supports many of the allegations that follow, far-fetched as they may sound.”

What actually happened to Olson, as well as his family’s continued quest to reveal the truth, will play out in Wormwood. The series will be released on December 15.

See below: The CIA Drugged Thousands of U.S. and Canadian Citizens

ast week, NASA released an ultra high definition video of the International Space Station, but many people may have trouble experiencing it as it was filmed. It’s not because of space radiation or mystery holes, but because of something far more Earthly.

The video, which was created in partnership with the European Space Agency, shows the crew of the ISS conducting a range of scientific experiments, all in unprecedented 8K. But the video’s uniqueness is also its downfall: Most computer monitors, even the very largest of desktop monitors, aren’t big enough to show 8K video in all its splendor. To put it another way, that’s a resolution of 7,680 pixels wide x 4,320 pixels tall, whereas the typical high-def YouTube video is 1,920 x 1,080 pixels.

1951, Project Artichoke


23 May 2016 No Comments

https://www.timeofreason.com/united-states-government-operations-in-mind-control-and-human-experimentation/projectartichokefrankolson_thumb/

Project ARTICHOKE (also referred to as Operation ARTICHOKE) was a CIA project that researched interrogation methods and arose from Project BLUEBIRD on August 20, 1951, run by the CIA Office of Scientific Intelligence.
[1] A memorandum by Richard Helms to CIA director Allen Dulles indicated Artichoke became Project MKULTRA on April 13, 1953. [2]

The project studied hypnosis, forced morphine addiction (and subsequent forced withdrawal), and the use of other chemicals, among other methods, to produce amnesia and other vulnerable states in subjects.

ARTICHOKE was an offensive program of mind control that gathered together the intelligence divisions of the US Army, Navy, Air Force, and FBI. In addition, the scope of the project was outlined in a memo dated January 1952 that stated, "Can we get control of an individual to the point where he will do our bidding against his will and even against fundamental laws of nature, such as self-preservation?"

A 22 January 1954 CIA memo shows that the Agency also pondered using hypnotized assassination.
The report’s central question was, “Can an individual of [redacted] descent be made to perform an act of attempted
assassination involuntarily under the influence of ARTICHOKE?” 
According to a subsequent CIA report, “ARTICHOKE is the Agency
cryptonym for the study and/or use of ‘special’ interrogation methods that have been known to include the use of drugs and chemicals, hypnosis, and ‘total isolation,’ a form of psychological harassment.”

Later, the document stipulated that this assassination attempt would be “against a prominent [redacted] politician or if necessary, against an American official.” 
After “American official” there was a hand written asterisk. 
At the end of the document, next to another handwritten asterisk, the words “simulated only” were handwritten.

According to the memo, CIA operatives would test this theory on a foreign national (his country of origin is redacted) who was once an Agency asset, but had since stopped cooperating.

During this program, Dr. Frank Olson, a US Army biological weapons researcher, was given the drug LSD without his knowledge. At 2.30 am on November 28, 1953, Dr Olson went through the window of the Statler Hotel’s room 1018a, which he was allegedly sharing with a CIA doctor, and died in the street below. The government declared his death a suicide. However, the family remained unsatisfied with the government’s account and in 1996 exhumed Dr Olson’s body and claimed to have found evidence of a blow to the head suffered before his fall.

In 2012 his sons filed a lawsuit against the US Government, claiming that their father was murdered in 1953 after he traveled to Europe and “witnessed extreme interrogations in which the CIA committed murder using biological agents that Dr Olson had developed”.

https://historyarchive.wordpress.com/2015/09/10/looking-back-1953-cia-doses-men-with-lsd-at-deep-creek-lake-part-1/

Time Will Tell
See how interesting history can be
LOOKING BACK 1953: CIA doses men with LSD at Deep Creek Lake (Part 1)


September 10, 2015 by jimrada

Dr. Frank R. Olson, a former biochemist on July 10, 1952 at Fort Detrick, allegedly committed suicide in 1953, when he jumped or fell from the tenth floor of a New York building. Olson’s family is suing the CIA in regard to the death. (AP Photo)

Two bottles of Cointreau sat on the table in front of Frank Olson. Both were open. Both were the same. He reached out for one of the bottles to pour himself an after-dinner drink. He was relaxing in a cabin with other men who had been forced to attend a three-day retreat at Deep Creek Lake from 11/18-20.

He hadn’t wanted to attend. He was having doubts about the ethicality of his work. He didn’t need to about the results of the work in which he was involved at Camp Detrick, in Frederick. He needed to think and clear his mind.

He knew the men he was sharing the large cabin on the lake with. They were members of the Special Operations Division and the CIA. Vincent Ruwet, Olson’s division chief and friend, had picked him up at his house and they had driven west to find this somewhat isolated cabin. It was a large, two-story rental cabin, off of Route 219 about 30 yards from Deep Creek Lake and 100 yards from the nearest neighbor.

The invitation to the “Deep Creek Rendezvous” said that a cover story had been given for the meeting. “CAMOUFLAGE: Winter meeting of script writers, editors, authors, lecturers, sports magazines.”

Olson believed they were there to talk about the joint projects of the Special Operations Division and CIA involving things like biological warfare and using drugs for mind control.

Unbeknownst to Olson, this was also a camouflage story to get him and others to the cabin for an experiment.

The men enjoyed a hearty dinner on Thursday, November 19, and then settled down in the cabin’s living room for after-dinner drinks. Robert Lashbrook, a CIA employee and one of the attendees, poured drinks for eight of the men present. He served the drinks and then poured himself and Sidney Gottlieb drinks from a separate bottle, although there was still liqueur in the first. If it struck anyone as odd or if anyone even noticed, no one remarked on it. Olson took the drink offered him. It was a simple choice, but one that would cost him his life.

He drank the Cointreau and then lost himself in his own thoughts. Sometime between then and Friday afternoon, Olson and the men were told their drinks had been dosed with LSD, according to the Church Committee report.

When Olson returned home that evening, his wife, Alice, “sensed something was wrong the moment he walked in the door. There was a stiffness in the way he kissed her hellow and held her. Like he was doing something mechanical, devoid of any meaning or affection,” H. P. Albarelli wrote in A Terrible Mistake.

Olson’s thoughts now were definitely elsewhere. Later that evening, he admitted to her, “I’ve made a terrible mistake.”

On Monday morning at 7:30 a.m., Olson was waiting for Ruwet when he arrived. Olson admitted he doubts about the work he was doing and said that he wanted to resign.

Olson told his wife later, “I talked to Vin. He said that I didn’t make a mistake. Everything is fine. I’m not going to resign.
The next day, Ruwet and Lashbrook convinced Olson to see a psychiatric doctor in New York. Actually, he was meeting with Harold Abramson, an allergist-pediatrician, who was working with the CIA.
Lashbrook and Olson shared a hotel room on the 13th floor of the Statler Hotel. Early in the morning of November 28, a loud crashing noise woke him up. According to the CIA, Olson threw himself out of the window, committing suicide.
The truth turned out to be something far darker and disturbing.
They used abreactive therapy on the soldiers, followed up by drugs and electroshock “therapy”.

Puerto Rico is one of the Caribbean Sea countries
Aldous Huxley

October 5, 1937 – John W. Campbell is hired at Astounding Science Fiction magazine.
March 1938 – Propaganda was so important to British Intelligence, that a special section was created for propaganda


It was funded by MI6 and headed by Sir Campbell Stuart.

The Astors held regular weekend parties and the group that attended them was known as ‘the Cliveden set’

"Want to become one of the top 100 most influential or powerful people in the world ... then launch and develop a popular, well used and well liked website that becomes one of the top 100 used websites in the world ,,, just like people such as Jimmy Wales who founded Wikipedia, who is reported to be in the top 100 most influential people on Planet Earth ...  not forgetting Mark Zuckerberg, who founded FaceBook who is one of those near the top of the list .... Walter Davis of INL News

SCIENTOLOGY & THE CIA
FEBRUARY 27, 2016 MARK HACKARD 

https://espionagehistoryarchive.com/2016/02/27/scientology-the-cia/  

Also see:

http://www.awn.bz/Scientology_createdbyMI6.html
http://www.awn.bz/Ron_Hubbard_GroomedByMI6.html
http://www.awn.bz/Scientology_MI6_RootsP1.html
http://www.awn.bz/Ron_Hubbard_MI6_Agent_P2.html


This presentation was read by Aleksandr Leonidovich Dvorkin, president of the Irinaeus of Lyons Center for Religious Research Studies, on January 26th, 2016, at a conference run by the Orthodox St. Tikhon University for the Humanities. (Translator’s note: While we wouldn’t claim that the Church of Scientology is an integral element of the US Intelligence Community, Dvorkin’s lecture is an excellent expose of the nexus between the Western power structure, its intelligence apparatus and dangerous cults).

The topic of Scientology’s connection to the CIA became commonplace long ago. It’s mentioned in a mass of articles, interviews, and television programs. But when I referred to this in passing during a conversation with one journalist several months ago, he took interest: do I have irrefutable evidence of or clues to this connection? Could I, so to say, point to a “smoking gun?”

The question interested me, and I decided to try and collect materials on this topic. So can we bring irrefutable evidence?


It’s understandable that if I could point to a “smoking gun,” my name would be Edward Snowden, and I would be hunted by US intelligence services, who (like any intelligence services) never disclose the names of organizations that cooperate with them, and for obvious reasons. However, open information on when the US government began to openly and publicly lobby the interests of Scientology (this occurred in 1993) could compose an entire arsenal of smoking guns. It knew full well about the cult’s activity in legally and illegally collecting information on various people and organizations.

From documents published today, we know that already in 1957 the CIA began investigating the activities of L. Ron Hubbard and Scientology. But the collated data that was the result of the investigation has still not been published up to this time. I don’t think we should expect the publication of these materials in the near future.

All his life, Hubbard himself was quite actively and constantly fascinated with two things: occultism and intelligence activities. For example, as a still wholly young man he entered the Rosicrucian order, undertook occult seances, and experienced certain otherworldly meetings.

Already as head of the Scientology cult, with pride he called Aleister Crowley, the most famous Satanist of the twentieth century, his “very good friend.” We can bring a multitude of other facts, but that wouldn’t fit into the parameters of the current presentation. I’ll remind you that John Atack’s excellent article “Hubbard and Occultism” was published in my Russian translation. [1]

Scientology’s official biography of the cult’s founder furiously denies Hubbard’s ties to occultism, but then it exaggerates his special relationship with the intelligence services on a cosmic scale. And so with pride the Scientologists inform us that during the war Hubbard worked in the US Office of Naval Intelligence (ONI), where he heroically proved himself in “catching foreign spies and rendering aid to US forces surrounded by the enemy on the island of Bataan.” As a matter of fact, we know that while working in ONI, Hubbard was just a rank-and-file clerk in the mail department, where he mainly censored the correspondence of servicemen – there’s certainly nothing heroic in that. Not once during the entire war did he take part in combat action.

Scientologists also invented the legend justifying Hubbard’s postwar time in the Pasadena lodge of the Satanic Ordo Templi Orientis (the “Order of the Eastern Temple” headed by Crowley) and his fascination with sex magic rituals, which he conducted together with lodge head Jack Parsons. According to the cult’s legend, Hubbard, you see, was sent into the Satanic cult by a certain intelligence agency as a mole and destroyed it from within. There is no need to speak about this version not withstanding factual criticism.

Hubbard’s enthusiasm for occultism also left its mark in the symbols of Scientology he and his followers developed.

Here, for example, is a Scientology flyer published during Hubbard’s life, called 

“The Golden Dawn” (so was called the occult lodge whence came Aleister Crowley).

Here is a contemporary audio and video publication of Hubbard’s works, also called “The Golden Dawn.”

And here’s what a speech by the current head of Scientology, David Miscavige, looks like. The occult symbology of a previously thought-out stage interior doesn’t need any clarification. Temple columns, the theme of “Golden Dawn and the Moon” (an extremely widespread occult symbol) over the “high priest.”

Here is the Scientology cross well-known to all, borrowed from the deck of Tarot cards developed by Crowley. I’ll remind you that this is in fact a crossed-out cross. Also pay attention to another detail: the eight-pointed star, on which is set the image of the cross. We’ll come back to it again.

[Scientology Aleister Crowley Tarot Card] The rose-and-cross Tarot card developed by Satanist Aleister Crowley. Note the likeness with the Scientology cross.

Now we will note that there is something in common between Scientology founder L. Ron Hubbard and the US Intelligence Community – a passion for occultism.
For a start, here are a few facts:

In 1989 in London former CIA officer Miles Copeland’s memoirs, The Game Player, were released, in which he told of a scheme set into action during the early-mid 1950s by his colleague Bob Mandelstam. The scheme was called “Occultism in High Places.” Its idea was simple: since some leaders and heads of governments had the habit of consulting with astrologers and other occult advisors, American intelligence officers were to “work with” these occultists and make them conduits of their agency’s influence.

This scheme worked, for example, when a “clairvoyant” sent by the agents convinced Ghana’s President Kwame Nkrumah to make a visit to China, during which a coup inspired by the CIA overthrew the absent leader. In Copeland’s words, the US intelligence community influenced Indonesian President Sukarno “quite solidly” through occult “seers” and “fortune tellers.”

Mandelstam also used the spiritual-political movement “Moral Rearmament,” which, according to Copeland, gave agents the opportunity to influence not only African and Asian political figures through secret channels, but also European leaders. It is there that Copeland also mentions a special agreement, which, in his words, the CIA concluded with Scientology, although he is silent about what was contained therein. Inasmuch as I was able to find out, no one aside from the chatty Copeland mentions this agreement (clearly established in the 1960’s) in open sources.

Copeland tells of another interesting case:

We sent into the Scientology cult our agent, who under the direction of Ron Hubbard himself became “clear,” but then he demanded and started to receive ever more “monetary compensation for operational expenditures,” which together with his savings he gave over to Dianetics.

So we will hardly find out who was ultimately manipulating whom: the CIA Scientology, or Scientology the CIA.

In the same way the work of US intelligence officers with a variety of occultists hasn’t gone unnoticed: we can presume that influence disseminated to both sides, and someone among the intelligence officers began practicing occultism. The set of images used by the secret services gives certain bases for making such presumptions concrete.

We see the same eight-pointed star, just like the one placed on the Scientology cross. Let’s return to the image of the Scientology cross. Its crossing out can also be viewed as the union of four daggers. And so the daggers cross out the symbol of Christianity. But the dagger is a famous symbol of intelligence, and precisely the star of the Intelligence Community is composed of them.

In the center of the Intelligence Community’s star is a rose with five petals. But this – the five-petaled rose – is the symbol of the Rosicrucian order. Is that a coincidence? Hardly: after all, even the image of the sharp leaflets between the petals is repeated.

And then there’s the most interesting thing: we’ll read the description of the seal that is found on the official site of the US Office of the Director of National Intelligence.
The eight points of the polar star symbolize the six departments and two independent agencies of the Intelligence Community. They are combined with the 15 stars around the circumference [sic] represent the elements of other agencies that are also part of the Intelligence Community [3].

The problem is that there aren’t 15 stars. There are 16. Count them yourself. So what then is the unnamed sixteenth organization, an element of which is part of the US Intelligence Community? Can we build suppositions?
Now we will finally bring some circumstantial evidence that can easily be found in open sources.

At the beginning of the 1990’s, the Greek police executed raids in the Athens Scientology office and confiscated a multitude of the cult’s internal documents, a part of which were published. In some of them are contained references to assistance that the CIA rendered to Scientology’s foreign branches.

[Scientology Greece Document] Scientology internal document on CIA cooperation, confiscated by Greek police.

Already in 2001 in the magazine Le Monde Diplomatique was published an article by the famous journalist Bruno Fuscero “Cults: a US Trojan Horse for Europe” [4], in which he quite reasonably wrote on the use of a whole set of cults, including Scientology, by US intelligence and diplomacy. Despite the sensational character of the article, no lawsuits followed after it.

Hardly anyone can deny that the US State Department lobbies the interests of Scientology in various countries: France; Germany; Italy; Greece; Russia; Hungary, etc. Even among the published Wikileaks documents, a report slipped by that after US Secretary of State Madeleine Albright’s arrival in Germany, German Scientologists were invited to the US Embassy for a briefing. Inasmuch as I know, no other cult enjoys such attention and such privileges from the United States government. I also understand that nothing is given for free in this world. So what can Scientology offer the US government that the latter would so actively lobby the interests of a comparatively not large cult with far from the most spotless reputation, and whose secret doctrine the whole world laughs at?

One of Scientology’s main objectives is the collection and storage of a large mass of information, so that with its help it can compromise and establish control over whomever: from a simple member of the cult who has gone astray to the powerful of this world, control of whom would give unlimited possibilities. 25 years ago the former head of the FBI’s Los Angeles Field Office said that Scientology “has one of the most effective intelligence services, which can even compete with the FBI.” From that time the cult’s capital has increased several times over, if not exponentially. It can afford to hire many more lawyers and private detectives, which significantly raises the cult’s potential for carrying out complex special operations.

Now a little history. In 1993, after a 25-year war it waged against Scientology, the US Internal Revenue Service de factosurrendered: having conducted secret negotiations with cult head David Miscavige, it signed an agreement with the group, according to which it recognized Scientology and all related organizations a religion and totally freed them from taxes. Namely after this agreement the State Department began to lobby Scientology’s interests in all the world’s countries. Moreover, a secret protocol was attached to the agreement (a new one, not the one mentioned by Copeland), and it hasn’t been published to this day. What could the content be?

Ukrainian Prime Minister Arseny Yatseniuk (who many years ago, as director of Aval Bank in Kiev, possibly underwent several Scientology courses) is an example of a man about whom personal information would be extremely interesting not only to Scientology, but also to the US Intelligence Community. I think that we could continue a list of people occupying high posts in various countries, people who are of interest to US intelligence, for a sufficiently long time. And if Scientology has such information and is ready to share it, then why wouldn’t an intelligence service use such an opportunity?

Yet in what way can the cult obtain such data? Scientology’s information collection is generated through several methods.

The first of them is auditing, presented by the cult as a kind of confession. But during this “confession,” everything that a person – in a state of light hypnotic trance – might report over a three-to-four hour session is picked up on audio and video and kept forever (I’ll remind you that this is conducted with the help of the so-called “E-Meter,” i.e. a primitive lie detector). Those who conduct the auditing are not obliged to keep the secrets of this “confession.” Rather, they collect the most intimate information about a person in order to turn him into an obedient slave. Let’s recall that during a raid of the Taganskaya Scientology “Ideal Org” by Moscow law enforcement, spy equipment for audio and video recording was found built into the walls of the auditing room. By the standards of the cult, such equipment should be present in all auditing facilities.

The second method is the “targeted” collection of information on a person who interests the cult. Specialists are hired for this, and specially instructed cult members help them. Either compromising materials are found, or they are fabricated. Among those who interest the cult could be famous personalities; figures in show business; law enforcement; officers of the security services; political figures; and of course, enemies of the cult.

We can and must emphasize that both methods of collecting and using information are flagrantly amoral. The cult uses the obtained data for self-advancement and self-expansion. I wonder, has it ever crossed the minds of American intelligence officers that receiving such information from the cult and using it is deeply amoral? Scientologists themselves think that the opportunity to control people in such a way serves a higher goal that brings the cult’s victory closer, meaning the victory of “good” in all the world. But if US intelligence, in no way believing in Scientology’s good and progressivism, finds it necessary and permissible to use this information, then we need to honestly admit that it considers getting information acquired by a quite dubious organization through deceit, bribery, theft, torture, and confidential confessions normal.

Finally, even if we believe that Scientology has absolutely no ties with any of the agencies of the US Intelligence Community, it could still absolutely and unmistakably be called a foreign intelligence organization active in the Russian Federation. And this intelligence organization sends personal and deeply confidential data on Russian citizens to its headquarters in the United States. That means we must approach such an organization in corresponding fashion.

But of course, it seems to me that we can claim with an enormous degree of confidence that Scientology has a multitude of connections with the US Intelligence Community. The evidence I’ve brought forth in this presentation, quite weighty if circumstantial, indicates precisely that. Almost two years ago, US President Barack Obama publicly announced that international religious freedom (read: its American version) is a vital factor of US national security [5]. I this that this announcement, striking in its cynical frankness, just admitted what had been an obvious fact for years. And we can probably suppose which organization hides behind the unnamed sixteenth star on the US Intelligence Community’s coat of arms.​

P.S. Thank you to my friend Gerry Armstrong for help in gathering materials for this article. 

[1] http://iriney.ru/knigi/kapkan-bezgranichnoj-svobodyi.-sbornik-statej-o-sajentologii,-dianetike-i-l.-r.-xabbarde/xabbard-i-okkultizm.html

[2] Miles Copeland. Confessions of the CIA Original Political Operative, London, 1989.

[3] http://www.dni.gov/index.php/intelligence-community/seal

[4] Русский перевод см. тут: http://www.entheta.ru/forum/viewtopic.php?id=2780. Мой сокращенный перевод: http://iriney.ru/sektyi-i-kultyi/sektovedenie/novosti-sektovedeniya/evropa-soprotivlyaetsya-amerikanskim-religioznyim-sektam.html

[5] http://www.voanews.com/content/president-obama-religious-freedom-matters-to-national-security/1845717.html


Translated by Mark Hackard.


In 1937, Aldous Huxley moved to Hollywood. He earned a substantial income as a Hollywood screenwriter. 52
Aldous Huxley says he was friends with Ron Hubbard. That friendship obviously began in Hollywood in 1937, when both writers were serving under William Wiseman in Hollywood. Huxley and Hubbard were MI 6 agents.
Huxley had written a book promoting World Government. Later in time, Huxley headed a covert operation to subvert America’s youth with hallucinogenic drugs. When Huxley wrote a book promoting hallucinogenic drugs, Hubbard recommended that Scientologists should read it.


Frank Olson, American bacteriologist
Frank Rudolph Olson was an American bacteriologist, biological warfare scientist, and Central Intelligence Agency employee who worked at Camp Detrick in Maryla

Somerset Maugham
Charles Cutting

Stephen Pearl Andrews (March 22, 1812 – May 21, 1886) was an American individualist anarchist, linguist, political philosopher, outspoken abolitionist and author of several books on the labor movement and individualist anarchism.

Ian MacBean – MI 6 British intelligence agent

Here are some quotes from that book:

Scientology is therefore Universology developed in the spirit of the Exact Sciences, and is wholly new in kind. It is the Core or Centre and the most distinctive Department of Universology… (page 37)
Scientology will re-assert and vindicate… Spiritualistic Realities and Tendencies…
(page 146)
It will be the supreme triumph of Scientology, the Exact Branch of this new Universal Science, to exhibit in Diagram, and by illustrative object-teaching, all the Root-thoughts of which the Human Mind is capable… (page 165)
The same year that Andrews started the idea of Scientology, the Cecil family took up the idea.
In 1871, Arthur Balfour and his in-laws form a private group to study paranormal phenomena.

* * *
Psychiatrist Josef Breuer was treating Bertha Pappenheim in the summer of 1880.
He found that when she recalled a series of memories back to a traumatic memory, one of her many symptoms would disappear. Breuer drew two important conclusions from his work with Bertha: that her symptoms were the result of thoughts that were buried in her unconscious and that when these thoughts were spoken and became conscious, the symptoms disappeared.
Breuer called this catharsis therapy. It was also called abreactive therapy and talking therapy.
Catharsis or abreactive therapy –
The process of bringing repressed ideas and feelings into consciousness.
It is the reliving of past traumatic incidents buried in the subconscious.

Sigmund Freud began using this cathartic treatment under Breuer’s guidance.

In 1882, Arthur Balfour created the Society for Psychical Research. They conducted scientific research into mental and spiritual phenomena. They developed the subjects of Dianetics and Scientology. All the basic mental, spiritual, and religious ideas in Dianetics and Scientology were developed by the SPR, before L. Ron Hubbard was even born. That includes the therapy used.
Sigmund Freud was a member of the Society for Psychical Research. The SPR also conducted extensive research into catharsis therapy. The subjects of Dianetics and Scientology were tied together from the beginning and both subjects were underneath the Cecil family, which means underneath British intelligence.
When Ron Hubbard was a teenager he was recruited by British intelligence.


Thereafter he executed one intelligence assignment after the other for his entire life.
They groomed Hubbard to be the front man for their subjects of Dianetics and Scientology. 


You can read about that in Scientology Roots Chapter Seven – The First Scientologists and Their Masters.
The common denominator that explains all of Hubbard’s actions in life ….

Ron Hubbard told Scientologists to support the British New World Order.
He advocates the worst sociopaths in the world having direct control over the life of every individual person.


scientology-moscow

The basic technology of radio-based detection and tracking evolved independently and with great secrecy in a number of nations during the second half of the 1930s. At the start of the war in Europe in September 1939, both Great Britain and Germany had begun the actual military use of these systems. In Great Britain this technology was called RDF, standing for Range and Direction Finding, while in Germany the name Funkmessgerät (radio measuring device) was often used.
Little known factoid: The acronym RADAR (for RAdio Detection And Ranging) was coined by the U.S. Navy in 1940, and the subsequent name “radar” was soon widely used.
Hubbard’s mission was to explore not only what the problem areas were, and if the cause could be established beyond simple storm conditions, as well as testing ideas on how to improve range, clarity versus loss of signal, and tracking magnetic interference “zones” largely caused by polar magnetism and to some degree, in certain locations, from solar flares commonly known as “Northern Lights”. Russia’s alliance with Germany, combined with Japanese incursions in the North-east coastline of China made Alaska suddenly very key to the United States and Britain, militarily.
Ketchikan, where Hubbard ended up, was a particularly key industrial and manufacturing city, but back in the time when radio was still quite fledgling, (the 1930’s) it suffered from severe problems with radio communications, largely due to extreme weather conditions and other more confounding influences. This, of course, made radio-direction finding for ship and plane navigation (and submarines) a very urgent problem.
Using his “intimates” at the Explorer’s Club, he carried an Explorer’s Club Flag (#105) which provided the first layer of intelligence cover – with the commonly used British “I’m on expedition” cover.
He called it “Alaskan Radio-Experimental Expedition”, with the outer stated purpose being to update the U.S. Coast Pilot guide regarding the coastlines of Alaska and B.C. Although he did that, that’s not the real reason, as we already covered.
When he tied up his sloop, the Magician, at Thomas Basin in Ketchikn on Friday, August 31, 1940 what he told other people was that his purpose in coming to Alaska “was two-fold, one to win a bet and another to gather material for a novel of Alaskan salmon fishing”. (The Ketchikan Chronicle).

So, he also employed the well-used by British intelligence agents (like Somerset Maugham) “writer” intelligence cover and even the “just here for the fishing” one! (also known as a shore story).

Evidence That L. Ron Hubbard Was Working For British Intelligence In 1940, 1941, and 1942
 https://mikemcclaughry.wordpress.com/2017/11/08/evidence-that-l-ron-hubbard-was-working-for-british-intelligence-in-1940-1941-and-1942
November 8th, 2017- McClaughry
It was on June 11, 1940 that William Stephenson arrived in New York to start the British Security Coordination to get America into the war – WWII. He arrived aboard the SS Britannic with John Arthur Reed Pepper (his SIS man) and family in tow.
The first order of business was getting a “control” point for Secret Intelligence work. Someone who was fully aboard the British agenda and more importantly, would do whatever the British told him to do. Vincent Astor, with numerous familial connections into British high society, was chosen to hold that function while a more permanent arrangement was being worked on. (the COI, then the OSS).
Every step of the way was controlled by the British.
Stephenson told President Roosevelt, Roosevelt told the Secretary of the Navy, who then told the Chief of Naval Operations that Astor would now be unofficially in charge of ALL intelligence work in the New York area, including the Office of Naval Intelligence in New York City. This is the Third Naval District (abbreviation – 3ND).
No questions asked – that’s the way it IS kind of thing.
This also means that Astor is in charge of any agent selection/recommendations etc. in the New York area both then and when the 1939 Foreign Espionage function was transferred to the Foreign Intelligence Branch (OP-16-F-9) in early 1941.
The New York area was basically the who’s who in intelligence. Anywhere from William Donovan to David K.E. Bruce to John Riheldaffer (head of OP-16-F-9) to people like L. Ron Hubbard.

L. Ron Hubbard had already connected up with the Astor “secret” intelligence/naval reserve organization called the ROOM, and because of those connections had gained entrance to the Explorer’s Club of New York – being officially made a member in February of 1940.
Astor is actually even referred to as the “British Intelligence” section at the 3rd naval district, as I am about to show you.
There are a number of other significant events in the British intelligence community occurring right in this time frame. You can peruse a timeline of some of the main ones in my post: Straightening Out The Timeline Around Hubbard’s Intelligence Background – Plus a few other things.
Right after Astor was ensconced in the Third Naval District, Hubbard was sent on a naval intelligence mission for Stephenson and the BSC (who is who was actually controlling Astor).
William Stephenson told President Roosevelt, and Roosevelt told his cabinet, that they needed to recognize the great potential (and threat in enemy hands) of radio-based detection and tracking, and began the development of ship- and land-based systems. The first of these were fielded by the U.S. Navy in early 1940, hence Hubbard’s involvement as a civilian intelligence agent (remember the ROOMs heavy ties to the U.S. navy).

Hubbard was being engaged to assist the British (through his connections to Astor’s ROOM and its corresponding Explorer’s Club members) in the Alaskan deployment of Range and Direction Finding.

Note: The fact that he was doing this for British Intelligence and he was knowledgeable of MI6 agent Alistair Crowley, appears to have had no small amount of bearing on naming his ship for the trip – The Magician. Crowley’s intelligence cover throughout his career was that of an “occult magician”.


Joseph Cheesman Thompson of the US Navy and Consuelo Andrew Seoane of the US Army, served together as spies in Japan starting in 1909. They pretended they were studying coastal reptiles and amphibians, but they were actually charting possible invasion routes and counting all the Japanese fortifications and naval guns that were part of Japan’s coastal defenses. Their espionage work went on from there into places other than Japan. In a subsequent assignment, Thompson was sent into China because of the Boxer rebellion there.



TELL THE SAME STORIES!! TIME FOR THIS CULT TO BE TAKEN APART!! NO TAX ..EXEMPT STATUS...IT IS NOT A CHURCH!!!

It's been more than a decade since Shelly Miscavige, the wife of Scientology's revered yet controversial leader David Miscavige, has been seen alive or in public.
The last people to see Shelly alive all agree that she vanished in disturbing circumstances 13 years ago.
Many former members of the highly-secretive church allege Shelly's husband David would be one of the few people to know where his wife, the high Priestess of Scientology, may be.
In a new investigation by 60 Minutes, the current affairs program travelled to the US and to the gates of Scientology's most secure compound to ask, where is Shelly Miscavige?
The church has previously claimed Ms Miscavige has gone to ground, working for Scientology behind the scenes while her husband runs things publicly.
The Gold Base Compound, the international headquarters of Scientology. Photo / 60 Minutes
Others, including Ms Miscavige's former friend Leah Remini, fear for her safety.
Ron Miscavige, the father of David and a member of Scientology for 42 years, is terrified for his daughter-in-law.
"Shelly, she'll never be free," Mr Miscavige tells 60 Minutes.
The church, in its response to the programme, said show was passing off "fiction and salacious gossip as truth".
It's alleged Shelly was locked away by her husband more than a decade ago, less than a year after the high-profile wedding of Tom Cruise and Katie Holmes in 2005.
Through tears, Ron admits it would be easy for the church to have done exactly that.

"I know it's difficult to believe, but the worst thing about this is I'm telling you the truth," he said.
"That's the worst goddamn thing that's going on in this interview. This happens. These are pretty bad people, but they don't have a conscience and that lets them do it.
"She has no hope whatsoever of ever getting into the good graces of Dave or going free. None."
Ron left the church in 2012 and was cut off by Scientology — and his entire family — because of it.
Ron Miscavige fears for his daughter-in-law. Photo / 60 Minutes

"I feel grief-y because look I lost my family. It's like they're dead. They're gone. My two daughters, my grandchildren," he said.
Mike Rinder, an Aussie and Scientology's former special affairs director, said the church has left hundreds of families broken.
"If there's one thing that is the common thread that we see throughout the stories of Scientology it's broken families. It's destroyed families," Rinder tells the program.
The former Scientology member was once one of highest-ranked officials in the church.

He last spoke to Shelly in August 2005. She had expressed concerns to him about the church but a month later, she'd vanished.
Tony Ortega, a long-time critic and former member of Scientology, has spent years investigating the church.

The Scientology reporter claims Shelly's final moment of freedom came in mid-2005, not long after the high priestess reportedly completed admin work without her husband's approval.

"He just blows his stack, and I've got eye witnesses for this," Ortega told 60 Minutes.
"He had the biggest temper tantrum of all time. A week later she vanished."
Shelly and David Miscavige. Photo / 60 Minutes
Leah Remini, who clawed her way out of Scientology in 2013, is worried sick for her friend.
"You can't just do what you want with a human being," Remini told the current affairs program.
Remini filed a missing persons report for Shelly in 2013

The Los Angeles Police Department ruled the report was "unfounded" and closed the case, claiming officers had met with Shelly.
A lawyer representing Ms Miscavige told 60 Minutes the Scientology queen was "disgusted" about Remini's allegations and denied suggestions she was missing.
But Remini is still fighting.

"It's getting boring, this response from Scientology. And I'm gonna say it. I'll say it every time now. Cut the bullshit," she said.
"If what we're saying is untrue, sue us, me and Mike (Rinder). We're ready for the lawsuit, so that's what I keep saying. we welcome your lawsuit. We welcome it."

The moment Leah Remini noticed
As Leah Remini stood with her Scientology friends at the 2006 wedding of Tom Cruise and Katie Holmes, she looked around for her friend Shelly.
David Miscavige, the leader of the highly-secretive church, was there as Cruise's best man.
But his wife Shelly, who he married in 1982, wasn't.
That was the first time Remini, who very publicly left Scientology in 2013, held concerns for her long-time friend.
Leah Remini and Mark Rinder welcome a lawsuit from Scientology. Photo / 60 Minutes

"Shelly was always where David Miscavige was," Remini told ABC News in 2015.
"It was a wedding of the century … it was like, "where's Shelly?'

"It's such a simple thing. It's a big wedding that the leader of the Church is here and his wife isn't. It's getting weirder because you're making it weirder," Remini said, claiming anyone she tried to ask wouldn't give her a straight answer.
Nancy Many, who left Scientology in 1996, said Remini was "attacked" when she asked about Shelly's disappearance.

"Leah asked about David's wife and came under an unbelievable torrent of attack on her, an attack and inquisition," Many told Reuters in 2013.
Nine months after Remini questioned the whereabouts of her friend, Shelly made what has remained her final public appearance.

In her December 2016 series Scientology and the Aftermath, Remini said LAPD's response left her with more questions.
"There's still answers that I need. I do not know that she is alive. I do not know that she's not being held against her will," she said.
"I do not know these things and so if the church produces her, by bringing her to an event, even if she went on a program and said, 'Hi, Leah Remini. Go f*** yourself,' I'd be happy to know that she was alive.

"The police department should say, 'Yes, we've seen her.' No, I wasn't told that. I was told that a representative saw her or spoke to her. I'm going to continue to get and gather information."

In a statement released ahead of Remini's eight-part documentary, the church said the actress "seeks publicity by maliciously spreading lies about the Church using the same handful of bitter zealots who were kicked out years ago for chronic dishonesty and corruption and whose false claims the Church refuted years ago, including through judicial decisions".


Ron Hubbard’s next intelligence assignment was issuing British propaganda.
William Wiseman was the head of MI6 in the United States. In the mid 1930′s Wiseman was sent to Hollywood where he used his influence to “encourage a favorable portrayal of the British Empire in American films”


In 1936 Hubbard gets “called to Hollywood” (likely by Wiseman) – a British intelligence assignment.  39
Memory And Automaticity, an LRH lecture 16 December 1952 –
I worked for Hollywood for about a year… This is clear back in 1936 and 37.


Hubbard in Peking, under the tutelage of British MI6 agent Ian MacBean

 Robert Arthur Talbot Gascoyne-Cecil (Lord Salisbury)


Commander Thompson was very close friends with Clara Thompson. She worked at Chestnut Lodge Sanitarium which is only a few miles away from Saint Elizabeths Hospital. She was trained at Tavistock Clinic, the place where John Rawlings Rees was working.


David K.E. Bruce

Development of Dianetics and Scientology
Stephen Pearl Andrews was a leader in the religious movement called Spiritualism.


Stephen Pearl Andrews (March 22, 1812 – May 21, 1886) was an American individualist anarchist, linguist, political philosopher, outspoken abolitionist and author of several books on the labor movement and individualist anarchism.
Andrews was born in Templeton, Massachusetts on March 22, 1812, the youngest of eight children of the Reverend Elisha Andrews and his wife Ann Lathrop. He grew up thirty-five miles northeast in Hinsdale, New Hampshire.[1] Andrews went to Louisiana at age 19 and studied and practiced law there. Appalled by slavery, he became an abolitionist. He was the first counsel of Mrs. Myra Clark Gaines in her celebrated suits. Having moved to Texas in 1839, Andrews and his family were almost killed because of his abolitionist lectures and had to flee in 1843. Andrews travelled to England, where he was unsuccessful at raising funds for the abolitionist movement back in the United States.
While in England, Andrews became interested in Isaac Pitman's new shorthand writing system and upon his return to the United States he taught and wrote about the shorthand writing system and devised a popular system of phonographic reporting. To further this, he published a series of instruction books and edited two journals, The Anglo-Saxon and The Propagandist. Andrews devised a "scientific" language he called Alwato in which he was wont to converse and correspond with pupils. At the time of his death, Andrews was compiling a dictionary of Alwato which was published posthumously. A remarkable linguist, he also became interested in phonetics and the study of foreign languages, eventually teaching himself "no fewer than 32" languages.
By the end of the 1840s, he began to focus his energies on utopian communities. Fellow individualist anarchist Josiah Warren was responsible for Andrew's conversion to radical individualism and in 1851 they established Modern Times in Brentwood, New York. He was elected an Associate Fellow of the American Academy of Arts and Sciences in 1846.  In 1857, Andrews established Unity Home in New York City. By the 1860s, he was propounding an ideal society called pantarchy which is a society with a voluntary government strongly connected with a New Catholic Church and from this he moved on to a philosophy he called "universology" which stressed the unity of all knowledge and activities. He was also among the first Americans to discover Karl Marx and the first to publish his Communist Manifesto in the United States.


Andrews was one of the first to use the word scientology.


The word is defined as a neologism in his 1871 book

 The Primary Synopsis of Universology and Alwato: The New Scientific Universal Language.


 In the 1870s, Andrews promoted Joseph Rodes Buchanan's Psychometry besides his own universology predicting that a priori derived knowledge would supersede empirical science as exact science.


Andrews was also considered a leader in the religious movement of spiritualism.


Anarcho-syndicalist Rudolf Rocker called Andrews a significant exponent of libertarian socialism in the United States.

L. Ron Hubbard was not “mankind’s greatest friend”.
As an intelligence agent for the British slavemasters – he was one of mankind’s greatest enemies.

Formation of MI 6

In 1909, the British Home Office became MI 5 and the British Foreign Office became MI 6.
MI5 is Britain’s counter-espionage service. It operates inside Great Britain.
MI6 conducts intelligence activities on foreign soil, outside of Britain.

Admiral Sir George Mansfield Smith-Cumming headed the new Foreign Section of the British Secret Service.
The new Foreign Section is called the Secret Intelligence Service (SIS) and MI 6.

Mansfield_Cumming_Admiral Sir George Mansfield Smith-Cumming headed the new Foreign Section of the British Secret Service.

Commander Thompson Mentor To Ron Hubbard
.
Commander Joseph Thompson was a medical officer (neurosurgeon) in the US Navy.

Joseph Cheesman Thompson
Joseph Thompson of the US Navy and Consuelo Andrew Seoane of the US Army, served together as spies in Japan starting in 1909. They pretended they were studying coastal reptiles and amphibians, but they were actually charting possible invasion routes and counting all the Japanese fortifications and naval guns that were part of Japan’s coastal defenses. Their espionage work went on from there into places other than Japan. In a subsequent assignment, Thompson was sent into China because of the Boxer rebellion there.
Commander Thompson had a career doing intelligence work using the same archaeologist, exploring scientist cover. He studied bugs and dug up ancient graves, sometimes operating under his real name and sometimes using fake names such as Dr. Victor Kuhne and Joe Tom Sun.  24
Commander Thompson would become the mentor to Ron Hubbard.
On 13 March 1911 Lafayette Ronald Hubbard was born. He is the son of United States naval commander Harry Ross Hubbard and Ledora May Hubbard. A friend of Ron’s father was US Navy Commander Joseph “Snake” Thompson.

All of the basic mental, spiritual, and religious ideas found in Dianetics and Scientology were already developed by the Society for Psychical Research, before L. Ron Hubbard was even born.

That includes the therapy used.

Vincent Astor Intelligence Network – Naval Reserves
Waldorf Astor was an early member of the Round Table. He and his wife Nancy lived in an estate called Cliveden.
Waldorf and Nancy Astor

The Astors held regular weekend parties and the group that attended them was known as ‘the Cliveden set’.
Some of them were –
Edward Wood, Lord Halifax  (member of Round Table)
Philip Kerr, Lord Lothian  (member of Round Table)
Lionel Curtis  (member of Round Table)
Robert Brand  (member of Round Table)
Geoffrey Dawson  (member of Round Table, editor London Times)
Samuel Hoare  (Foreign Secretary, MI 6)

Waldorf Astor had a wealthy relative in America – William Vincent Astor.
William Vincent Astor
Franklin Delano Roosevelt was Assistant Secretary of the US Navy from 1913 to 1920. Vincent Astor was good friends with Franklin Roosevelt, and they met during World War I to discuss using yachts to make a Naval Reserve Force. They selected their wealthy socialite friends to form a private intelligence network called the Naval Reserves. Their socialite pals were young men who shared the “right” schools, clubs, and connections, and all of them were pro-British. These reserve intelligence officers were under the Office of Naval Intelligence.  12, 15

Roosevelt as Assistant Secretary of the US Navy
Astor and Roosevelt had in common that their grandfathers became wealthy trafficking opium into China.
The grandfather of Franklin Delano Roosevelt, Warren Delano Jr., was chief of operations for Russell & Co., a Boston trading firm which did big business in the China opium trade in Canton. He first went to China at age 24 and spent a decade dealing opium on the Pearl River before returning to New York wealthy. He admitted in letters home that opium had an “unhappy effect” on its users, but argued that its sale was “fair, honorable, and legitimate,” akin to importing wine and spirits to America.
Astor’s grandfather became wealthy from trading furs and trafficking opium.
Woodrow Wilson became President of the United States in 1913.
Edward House helped Wilson get elected and was Wilson’s closest adviser.
Colonel Edward Mandell House

World War I was from 1914 to 1919. That was an European conflict that had nothing to do with the United States. American citizens were against America getting into the war. But the British wanted to get America involved on the British side.
Sir George Mansfield Smith-Cumming sent Sir William Wiseman to run the British intelligence effort in America. Wiseman and Colonel House were good buddies. Wiseman was the handler of House, and House was invested in controlling American President Woodrow Wilson. Wiseman and House worked together on handling Wilson to get America into the war.


Woodrow Wilson became President of the United States in 1913.

Woodrow Wilson
Edward House helped Wilson get elected and was Wilson’s closest adviser.
Colonel Edward Mandell House


World War I was from 1914 to 1919. That was an European conflict that had nothing to do with the United States. American citizens were against America getting into the war. But the British wanted to get America involved on the British side.
Sir George Mansfield Smith-Cumming sent Sir William Wiseman to run the British intelligence effort in America. Wiseman and Colonel House were good buddies. Wiseman was the handler of House, and House was invested in controlling American President Woodrow Wilson. Wiseman and House worked together on handling Wilson to get America into the war.

Aleister Crowley was an MI 6 agent who had the cover of being in the occult. Robert Cecil was his patron who had sent him to Cambridge University for training as a “diplomat”. So, Robert Cecil himself was who recruited Aleister Crowley for British intelligence.
Aleister Crowley worked for William Wiseman during World War I and helped with getting America into the war.
In the 1920’s and 1930’s Crowley spied on Germans with occult interests. 17, 25 











Edward Alexander Crowley
Spencer Eddy, a wealthy New York socialite, was close friends with Franklin Roosevelt.
Spencer Fayette Eddy


In early 1916, William Wiseman recommends to Franklin Roosevelt to have Spencer Eddy start up a spy network to gather domestic intelligence. Eddy agreed to do it.
Commander Edward McCauley, Jr. was assistant director of Naval Intelligence and he acted as the handler for Eddy. Eddy recruited agents from the Naval Reserve Force. The agents in Eddy’s intelligence group were designated voluntary agents of Office of Naval Intelligence. 1

On 6 January 1917, Commander McCauley recruited all these voluntary agents into the United States Naval Reserve Force and gave them the rank of lieutenant junior grade. These men were made officers with temporary commissions and served as “volunteer agents” for the Office of Naval Intelligence. Vincent Astorwas made a Commander in the Naval Reserve.  13, 14


The Naval Reserve was basically a pro-British private intelligence network headed by Vincent Astor.
A little later in time Ron Hubbard was accepted into the Naval Reserves as an intelligence officer.


.
Behavior Modification by Psychiatry

During World War I, John Rawlings Rees and some other psychs were brought into the British Army to handle officer selection and to treat soldiers suffering from shell shock. They called it battle neurosis when the soldiers did not want to kill and be killed.
Their interest was in how to make men into killers and how to choose men to lead and influence others to kill.

They used abreactive therapy on the soldiers, followed up by drugs and electroshock “therapy”.

In 1920, these same psychs formed the Tavistock Institute of Medical Psychology, also called the Tavistock Clinic. They used the same treatments on the civilian population then.

John Rawlings Rees made the following statements about Tavistock Clinic –

…the best results with the war neuroses are obtained when they have active treatment.

“Psychosurgery” in the shape of abreaction followed by simple re-education should as a rule precede a period of rest under narcosis.

There is, however, no question that the general method of abreaction followed by sedation is applicable to many cases in civilian life… 


 

JOHN RAWLINGS REES – TAVISTOCK
John Rawlings Rees was one of the psychiatrists who worked for British intelligence.


Hubbard Imitated Commander Thompson

1923 – Commander Joseph “Snake” Thompson had recently been to Vienna and was a personal student of Sigmund Freud on the subject of the mind and psychoanalysis.
Joseph Thompson
In the autumn of 1923, Snake was on his way back to Washington DC aboard the USS Ulysses S. Grant. Ron Hubbard and his parents boarded the same ship on 1 November 1923, also on their way to Washington, DC.
During this voyage, Ron meets Commander Joseph Thompson. 5

United States Ship Ulysses S. Grant
Commander Thompson was stationed at Saint Elizabeths Hospital in Washington, DC – a mental health hospital.

Commander Thompson was very close friends with Clara Thompson. She worked at Chestnut Lodge Sanitarium which is only a few miles away from Saint Elizabeths Hospital. She was trained at Tavistock Clinic, the place where John Rawlings Rees was working.

Clara Thompson
Starting in 1923, Commander Thompson became the mentor of L. Ron Hubbard who is 12 years old at the time. Thompson spent many afternoons in the Library of Congress teaching Ron Hubbard about the human mind. 5

Further Introduction to Dianetics, an LRH lecture 23 September 1950 –
I was in the Orient when I was young. Of course, I was a harum-scarum kid; I wasn’t thinking about deep philosophic problems; but I had a lot of friends. One such friend was Commander “Snake” Thompson.
He had studied under Sigmund Freud, and he found me a very wide-eyed and wide-eared boy. He had just come from Vienna, and his mouth and mind were full of associative words, libido theories, conversion, and all the rest of it. He had served as an intelligence officer in Japan during the First World War.

The Story of Dianetics and Scientology, an LRH lecture 18 October 1958 –

Anyway, at the Library of Congress in Washington, DC, where they have all the books on everything, he [Thompson] started shoving my nose into an education in the field of the mind. Now, that’s a very unusual thing to do, to take a twelve-year-old boy and start doing something with the mind. But he really got me interested in the subject – up to the point where I was pretty sure that Freud didn’t know what he was talking about.

Practicalities of a Practical Religion, an LRH lecture 3 June 1955 –
Now, another fellow who had been more or less my mentor when I was a little kid – as a matter of fact, I followed in the footsteps of this man – Commander Thompson…
I followed in the footsteps of this man –
Commander Thompson
Commander Thompson was an intelligence agent – not just in Japan during World War I, being an intelligence agent was his career. And that is exactly the career of Ron Hubbard, British intelligence agent, including him being the front man for Scientology. Scientology was always under the thumb of British intelligence.

Commander Joseph Thompson got Ron Hubbard started on his intelligence career.
Ron Hubbard followed Commander Thompson’s footsteps as an intelligence agent.


Mechanics of the Mind, an LRH lecture 10 January 1953 –
…I have approximated to a very remarkable degree the career of Commander Thompson…
…in the field of expeditions, explorations, I always favored certain quarters of the world, always went there and, when there, did certain things. It fits Commander Thompson’s record.
This man had a tremendous influence upon me.
Hubbard is revealing that his expeditions and explorations were cover for doing intelligence work.
Just like Commander Thompson did in his various explorations such as collecting bugs, digging up ancient graves, etc. Those activities were only a cover story to hide what he was really doing in each area – intelligence work.

The common denominator that explains all of Hubbard’s actions in life ….
L. Ron Hubbard
Vincent Astor Intelligence Network – The ROOM
Vincent Astor and his socialite friends required a retreat where they could gather in private to discuss political, financial and international topics. In 1927 Astor formed a secret society called The ROOM, which met monthly in an apartment at 34 East 62nd Street in New York City. All members had British ties and served as British agents. 4

The ROOM building

The ROOM was an outcropping of the previously formed Naval Reserves. The ROOM was the forerunner of the Office of Strategic Services – which was the forerunner of the Central Intelligence Agency.
The members conducted espionage in their travels around the world and they reported at the monthly meeting. Vincent Astor then forwarded the intelligence on to Franklin Roosevelt. It was a Roosevelt-Astor Espionage Ring.
Vincent Astor and Franklin Roosevelt
The most significant ROOM members were –
William Vincent Astor  (family connection in Round Table)
William Wiseman  (head of MI 6 in America)
William Donovan  (Chief of OSS)
David Kirkpatrick Este Bruce  (Chief of OSS in London)
Robert Gordon McKay  (member of OSS)
Charles Suydam Cutting  (member of OSS)
Frederick Trubee Davison  (member of CIA)
Somerset Maugham  (MI 6 agent)
Clarence L. Hay  (Naval Reserve intelligence agent)
William Rhinelander Stewart  (U.S. Office of Naval Intelligence)
Other important Room members were –
Winthrop Williams Aldrich  (son of Nelson Aldrich – who helped enact federal reserve system)
Nelson Doubleday  (publisher, friend of MI 6 agent Ian Fleming)
Barklie McKee Henry (schooled at Oxford University)
Kenneth B. Schley (close friends with Duke and Duchess of Windsor)
H. Nugent  (Kermit Roosevelt’s close English friend)
Reginald Fincke  (his daughter married a British nobleman)
Oliver Dwight Filley  (pilot with the Royal Flying Corps in World War I)
Kermit Roosevelt Sr. (son of American President Theodore Roosevelt, joined the British Army)
Theodore Roosevelt Jr. (son of American President Theodore Roosevelt)    27, 28

Leah Remini and her missing friend Shelly Miscavige, the wife of David Miscavige the head of Scientology 


The British slavemasters want to eliminate national boundaries and establish a World Government that is run by them. Thus British propaganda states that nationalism is the cause of wars. That is a lie. Individual nations are not the cause of wars, the wars have been caused by the British nobility.
May 1938 – John W. Campbell given full authority for Astounding Science Fiction magazine.
May 1938 – Ron Hubbard goes to New York, Street and Smith want him to write for their newly acquired magazine, Astounding Science Fiction. Out of ALL the writers there could be, they choose Ron Hubbard?
Naw, this is a plan going into effect. A propaganda plan.
Now Hubbard is on his new British intelligence assignment as a sci-fi writer. British propaganda is under and done by British intelligence, so when Hubbard starts pumping out New World Order propaganda in his sci-fi stories, he is working for British intelligence.

A copy of Ian MacBean’s 1929 letter to L. Ron Hubbard was an exhibit in the Gerald Armstrong 1 trial.

Scientology Roots Chapter Nine – 1 Hubbard’s Lifelong Intelligence Career

See:
http://www.awn.bz/Scientology_createdbyMI6.html
http://www.awn.bz/Ron_Hubbard_GroomedByMI6.html
http://www.awn.bz/Scientology_MI6_RootsP1.html
http://www.awn.bz/Ron_Hubbard_MI6_Agent_P2.html


https://mikemcclaughry.wordpress.com/the-reading-library/scientology/scientology-roots/scientology-roots-chapter-twelve-1-hubbards-lifelong-intelligence-career/

Scientology Roots Chapter Nine – 1 Hubbard’s Lifelong Intelligence Career
.
The British nobility has been working on a Grand Plan to make themselves the ruthless ruler of the entire world.


The rest of humanity does not agree to their idea that the British nobility should rule the world. They do not want to be obedient subjects, servants and slaves who live under the boot and say-so of the British aristocracy.
Most men want to live as free men who live under their own will and say-so.
Thus the British slavemasters conducted mental and spiritual research. Their real interest in studying the human mind and spirit was to learn how to control men, so they could modify his behavior into what they want all men to be – willing subjects under rule by the British nobility.
The Cecil family is one of the top British slavemaster families. Their family has been the head of British intelligence for over 400 years. Robert Cecil was the leader of an influential family called the Cecil Bloc.
He was the head of British intelligence and he was a British Prime Minister.
Robert Arthur Talbot Gascoyne-Cecil (Lord Salisbury)

One of his sisters had a son named Arthur Balfour. He was in the Cecil family and he was also a head of British intelligence and a Prime Minister of Britain.  20 Arthur J. Balfour

Development of Dianetics and Scientology

Stephen Pearl Andrews was a leader in the religious movement called Spiritualism.

Edward Mandell House Edward  and William Wiseman

Here is a contemporary audio and video publication of Hubbard’s works, also called “The Golden Dawn.”

​Be ready to surrender all your gold to listen to Golden Dawn.

Edward Alexander Crowley

L  Ron Hubbard as a young child


All of the basic mental, spiritual, and religious ideas found in Dianetics and Scientology were already developed by the Society for Psychical Research, before L. Ron Hubbard was even born. That includes the therapy used.

L. Ron Hubbard with John W. Campbell

Ron Hubbard in 1936. 

What is Scientology - A Religion or Business?
Marc Headley
Former Scientologist and Sea Org Member
Valuetainment presents..Aan interview with Patrick Bet-David the Founder of Valuetainment


Question:
When you think about Scientology .. what does it mean to you?
Answer: I's rather be deads than be in Scientology..
Question: Seriously .. you say that ...
Answer: I comtemplated just ... driving into a wall and just killing myself.. 
Question: You're being serious...
Answer:  Absolutely..
Questio: Suicide...
Answer: Death would be a better existence ... that living there in Scientology...
Question:
When you say beating people .. what do you mean by that?
Answer:  
They are being punched, and kicked while they are sotting at the table ... 
Quesion:
It is hard to belive that... how can an organisation do that period.?
Answer: Under the guise of religion ... you have thousands and thousands of these little aliens attached  to you ... 
Question: I have aliens attached to me?
Answer: everybody does... especially you ...
Question: 
Either its brilliant or the people that represent the CHurch of Scientology  and the Government that approved the Church of Scientyology are idiots ... 
INTRODUCTION:
"... So before you watch this interview I want to preface a few things because:
a part of this interiew is going to controversial and there are a lot of areas where I push the guest and some areas where he's going to say something that Scientologists are not going to agree with or like .. ther're probably  going to hare some of it .. some of what the guest say s... so while we did this interview we  decide to reach out to David McSchavich .. we sent and email ... our executive producer Sir Gerard Haran sent an email to him ... and sayin i am the exective producer to David Bed-David of Valuetainment Media we interviewed Marc Heady and in an effor to provide a right of objection and fair and balanced coverage we will like to offer David Mschavich equal time to tell his side of the story ... thank you Gerrard Haran... 
So that was our email to him..,. to be able to sit down with him .. as there was a lot fo questions I had to ask .. I have worked with a lot of Scientologists myself .. I've many good experiences .. I am not a Scientologist myself, but there was a time in my like when I was extremely curious ... I was an athestic at the time.... I went and studied everything ... I would go to every church and debate everybody .... with all these tough questions .... because I was trying to get clarity for myself... 

This was the response we received from the Church of Scientology..

Dear Mr Haran,

Controversy" about the Church is in evitably traceable to the same handfull of bitter former members licked out for their malfeandance and eithical lapsed many years ago.  Those who would seek to introduce controversy where noen exists have an agenda. In their case, it is always financial. They get paid to feen tales to tabloids that are salacious and untrue. They know nothing about what is on out new television channel -- our spiritual headquarters in Clearwater, Bridge Publications, our International Dissemination and Distribution Center, and our new Churches that span 23 nations and six continents. Thy eknow noting about Scientology Media productions, our hmanitiarian, drug rehabiliation and social betterment programs, and success. They have no creditability. Those who live in tim houses shouldn't throw can openers. We suggest you look into them. See, for example wwww.whoismarcheadley.com.
Regards
Media Relations

And the have a link below to find out more about the gentleman I am interviewing ...  and to be and give full disclosure ... sp not one's getting paid for this ...we are not paying Marc to do this interview .. we don;t pay our guests to be interviewed on Valuetainment ... that is full diisclosure ... Marc and I don't know each other ....  we don't have a friendship .. we don;t have a relationship .... the first time I ever met Marc when he was a guest on this show ... with that being said ... as you watch this .. you will notice a couple of parts where Marc gets pushed very ... very ... hard .... in certain areas and if there is an area that I am going give a perspective that nobody has thought about whne ti comes down to the Church of Scientology so i ask you to watch this with an open mind from the beginning to the end .... and I really want the hear from you as to what you took away from this interview with Marc Headly on the stories regarding Scientology ... truth or not .. I want to hear from you ... with that been said ... here's the interview with Marc Headly 

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=2eTmlwFlyQQ 

Marc Headly talks about the book
Blown for Good
Behind the Iron Curtain of Scientology
by  Marc Headly
 also was in Scientology and the Aftermath with Leah Remini
So I got a call from friends of mine and entrepenures 

What do you think about Scientology?
So I said listen..
I think that the best way to answer the question about what I think about Scientology ... I have my own opinionss about Scientology ....  I have a lot of friends who are Scientologists ... and I've worked with a lot of people who are Scientologists .... so i said .... let me reach out and find out who we can interview that can tell you all about Scientology and we can go through questions... 
So we contacted  David Miscavige   .. who pretty well runs Scientology 


David Miscavige is the leader of the Church of Scientology. His official title is Chairman of the ... The group started with running Hubbard's errands, but as they grew into ... well managed by Author Services Inc., of which Miscavige was Chairman of the ....  
https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/David_Miscavige 
 David Miscavige (/mɪˈskævɪdʒ/) is the leader of the Church of Scientology.[1] His official title is Chairman of the Board of the Religious Technology Center (RTC), a corporation that controls the trademarks and copyrights of Dianetics and Scientology.


Miscavige was a deputy to church founder L. Ron Hubbard (a "Commodore's messenger") while he was a teenager. He rose to a leadership position by the early 1980s and was named Chairman of the Board of RTC in 1987. Official church biographies describe Miscavige as "the ecclesiastical leader of the Scientology religion"

Since he assumed his leadership position, there have been a number of allegations made against Miscavige. These include claims of forced separation of family members, coercive fundraising practices, harassment of journalists and church critics, and humiliation of church staff members, including physical assaults upon them by Miscavige. Miscavige and church spokespersons deny the majority of these claims, often criticizing the credibility of those who bring them.


We realised that the last time David Miscavige did an interview was 24 years ago with Ted Carple ...and then after that ... out team did a little research and we came towith the name Marc Headley and we contacted Marc ... now this may not be the favourite person that Scientologists would want me to interveiw ...but ... because it would be a lot different if could have got David...then is we could not get David we wanted to get somebody ...we got Marc here... for some of you to know who Marc is ....Marc work for the Church of Scientology for 15 years from 1990 up until 2005 .... four years after L Ron Hubbard died... Marc was there for 15 years at the International Base of Scientology in California ... 
Marc Headley: The International Base of Scientology in California ...  is the facility that runs and control Scientology internationally..


Question: You guys have around 5,000 people that work for Scientology world wide and around 700 people who work at the International Base of Scientology in California ... 


Answer:  yes at that facility there is bewteen 500 and 700 people working there ... at that one facility in Cakifornia ..
Marc also wrote a book called:
"Blown for Good "
Behind the Iron Curtain of Scientology..
Marc's book ... Blown for Good ...  means blown for good the image and secrets of the Church of Scientology .. when Marc stepped away form the Church..... there were some ugly things that happened to Marc when he left Scientology for good ... 
Marc is going to shrae some of that experience ..
Mrc also was in an Emy Award Winning Series called
"Scientology and the Aftermath" ...  with Leah Remini


 Question:
When you think about Scientology .. what does it mean to you? 
back then ... not now..
Answer:  Then I just  considered   Scientology  as a belief system 


Answer: Then I just knew it as a belief system .... L Ron Hubard has written thousands and thousands of Policy Letters ...  and Bulletens ... about how an individual is treated if they resign from Sea Org...
the policy leters have to do with how they have to work in the Sea Orgnanisation and how they apply to the Sea Org buisnesses ... then the Bulletins .... have to do with the teachings of Scientology ... the auditing ... the councilling they do in Scientology .. the courses .... and that sort of thing .... so i went to a Scientology School when I was little ... I did Scientology Courses  at the Scientology Centre at night .... and that's sort of all I knew as a kid .... that's how we did things... you just .... they have certain ways about gong about living and ... that's all I knew as a kid, so when I was recruited to work for the Sea Organisation 
 expected when you are a kid in Scientology ... is that the best thing you can expect you can do is join the Sea Organisation... because that is the most dedicated group of Scientologists...
They dedicate a billion years ... you actually sign a contract .. a Billion_Year-Contract  of Employment with the Sea Organization...
Its almost expected when you are a kid in Sceintology  ... that the best
"It is expected when you are a kid in Scientology ... is that the best thing you can expect you can do is join the Sea Organisation... because that is the most dedicated group of Scientologists...
They dedicate a billion years ... you actually sign a contract .. a Billion_Year-Contract  of Employment with the Sea Organization...


Question:
You mean you are contracted to be with them for one billion years..


Answer: Yes  .. even when you die .. you are contracted to come back in the next life time to work for the Sea Org ..
In the Sea Organisation ... sometimes when people die ... you actually have an In Mormorium Notice that goes out ... and it says at the end that .... 
" this person in granted a 21 year Leave of Absense .. "
and they expect to see them back...


Question:
Did you yourself ... your mother was a member of the Church of Scientology in 1979, when Marc was 6 or 7 years old ... .... then afterwards .. all you know is Scientology ... then you started working with Scientology form the age of 16 to 31 ... what is Scientology you?


Answer: Then I just knew it as a belief system .... L Ron Hubard has written thousands and thousands of Policy Letters ...  and Bulletens ... about how an individual is treated if they resign from Sea Org...
the policy leters have to do with how they have to work in the Sea Orgnanisation and how they apply to the Sea Org buisnesses ... then the Bulletins .... have to do with the teachings of Scientology ... the auditing ... the councilling they doin Scientology .. the courses .... and that sort of thing .... so i went to a Scientology School when I was little ... I did Scientology Courses  at the Scientology Centre at night .... and that's sort of all I knew as a kid .... that's how we did thing ... you just .... they have certain ways about gong about living and ... that's all I knew as a kid, so when I was recruited to work for the Sea Organisation 
He originally thought Scientology as a beleif System
He was recruited to work for the Sea Organisation
Many Are Called. Few Are Chosen
Join Sea Org
"It is almost 
 expected when you are a kid in Scientology ... is that the best thing you can expect you can do is join the Sea Organisation... because that is the most dedicated group of Scientologists...
They dedicate a billion years ... you actually sign a contract .. a Billion_Year-Contract  of Employment with the Sea Organization...
Its almost expected when you are a kid in Sceintology  ... that the best
"It is expected when you are a kid in Scientology ... is that the best thing you can expect you can do is join the Sea Organisation... because that is the most dedicated group of Scientologists...
They dedicate a billion years ... you actually sign a contract .. a Billion_Year-Contract  of Employment with the Sea Organization...

Question:
You mean you are contracted to be with them for one billion years..
Answer: Yes  .. even when you die .. you are contracted to come back in the next life time to work for the Sea Org ..
I the Sea Organisation ... sometimes when people die ... you actually have an In Mormorium Notice that goes out ... and it says at the end that .... 
" this person in granted a 21 year Leave of Absense .. "
and they expect to see them back...


Question:
Did you yourself ... your mother was a member of the Church of Scientology for 11 years from  1979, when Marc was 6 or 7 years old ... .... then afterwards .. all you know is Scientology ... then you started working with Scientology from the age of 16 to 31 ... from 1979 onewards ..what is Scientology you? 
Did you look at Scientology as a religion of was it more as a secret society .. or like an organisation like the Freemasons or ... like a personal development .. Tony Robbins type of organisation .... estabilished group that had been around longer that Tony Robbins had been around ... and its kind of like the Nightingale Type of Group .. learning how to process  issues ... how to work better ,... how did you view Scientolgy when you were in it ... not today .. but when you were actally in Scientology ...


Answer:
Well they kind of drilled into us  the whole region angle ... 
They drilled us it was like we are a religion .. these are our religious beliefs? ... so when i was there .. I viewed Scientology as a religion .... but at the same time .. when you are at the International Headquaters of Scientology in California .. .there's crazy shit going on you all ovr the place .... so when you see that stuff... there's a lot of mental gymnatistics  is happening to justify we are doing this is the name of religion .... like this guy  David Miscavige   is beating people   

Question:
You actually witnessed  David Miscavige   actually beating people ....  when you say beating people .. what do you mean by that..


Answer:
Absolutely ... absolutely .... punching with you fists into the face ....  shoving ... kicking ... punching .... kicking ... throwing people across tables ... and throwing people against walls ..


Question:
Who were the people that this was happening to...


Answer:
Most of the people he would give beat downs to were  International Executives ...
so these were the people who were in  charge of runing Scientology  ....  were to most beat people at that property ..


Question:
These were influential names ....
these were influential figures within the Church of Scientology ... and they were also
 in the Sea Organisation .... so the people that are fighting ..... the people that are beating each other up .... are the top executives  of the Church of Scientology and the Sea Org.   .... 


Answer: Yeh... if any Scientologist knew that the people that we was beating.. they would know all their names ... Marc Ingerg, Marc Jager ...Gullaume Leserve 
Hiborjans  .. Mike Rinder ...  any of the people ...  these people he would give a beat down to were well know executives in the Church of Scientology ...  they were also in the Sea organization, so ... the people that are fighting and beating each othewr up are the top executives of Scientology ... so mit wouldn't be a public member like a person whoi goes into an Org in Cincinatti .. that person wouldn't see or be part this ... its all..


Question:  Behind the Scenes?


Answer: It all happened behind the curtain..


Question: Did it ever happen to you... did you 


Answer: On two occasisons David Miscavige struck me ... and one of the last occassions wa sin thr 2000's ... it was shortly before I left Scientology ...David Miscavige punched me .. be basically ... ... I had glasses at the time ... David Miscavige punched me so hard in the face that my glasses broke ....and um .. I went up against a cabinet  .. kinda like a desk unit  and um ... I didn't fall down or anything ... but when I regained myself David Miscavige saw i was coming for him ... and he's not a big guy .. he usually has an entourage with him though .... and as soon as he saw the look in my eyes ... these two guys grabbed and took me out of the building and as I was being led out of the building ... David Miscavige said ... " did you see that? ....jhat was the guy that was going tohit me.. and I said .. you bet .... I was the guy that was going to hit you ... "


Question: Not tgo play the devils advocate ... but how many other peoplehave come out saying what you're saying about David Miscavige actually hitting people .... 


Answer: at  least 20 to 30 other people..


Question: 20 other people have come out saying this has happened?


Answer: Absolutely ...


Question: if that is the case ... how come David Miscavige is still runniing the entire thing... ?


Answer: Because they've got a group of 50 people there that they write affidavits for the people ...


Question: Right?
Answer: They give them to them and they sign them..


So he's got 50 people against the 30 people ... that say that never happened and that David Miscavige never even yelled at anybody ...  and
say in the affidavits that David Miscavige  found a little birdie outside that wa damaged and David Miscavige nursed the little birdie back to life .... 
#avid Miscavige 


Question: Right?:


Answer:  These people writing these affidavits were experts and good at writing pure fiction ... and if they wanted to, tghey could have 200 of those affidavits


Question: Has there ever been a deep investigation into the Church ... or no...


Answer: Absolutley ..



Question: I mean deep ... deep ... investigations..


Answer: I have seen government drone footage of the actual International Headquaters .. I was shown this by the FBI ... 


Question: What was the court ruling afterwards?


Answer: it was dropped ..


Question: So you can see that ... I am not trying to defend the Scientologists .. I am not trying to defend the other side .. I am just trying to get an argument on both sides to say ... OK ... if that's really happened... who hasn't a court ... the court process .. someone would say .. the court probably didn't proceed because the court paid them off.... 

Answer: No... I can tell you exactly why they get out of it ... 


Question: Tell me why?


Answer: How ever spends the most money on their lawyers and who ever has the best legal team are the ones that win the case... and Scientology in the cases that have been brought against them..


Question: Yep..


Answer: Have ... like myself and my wife sued Scientology ,,, 

Legal Opinion by O'Scannlain, Curcuit |Judge
We considered two fromer minister's claims that the Church of Scientology forced them to provide labour in violation of the Trafficing Victims Protection Act...
And Scientology spent 10's of million of dollars fighting that case... 


Question: Your case..?


Answer: Just my case ... Scientology has an unlimited legal and private investigation team and dirty budget that they can call from .... they have an entire spy wing in Los Angelos .... in the 1970's there was a group called The Guardian's Office .. and that was the spy wing of Scientology  .. they purpetrated the largest infiltration into the United States Government in its history ....you can Google this ... Guardian's Office ...
Newspaper clippings
The F.B. I. Raid
Scientologists Charge Narcotics Vover-Up
Los Angelos Times ..
F.B.I Raids of Scientology Are Ruled Improper...
Judge clalls Warrants Too Broad to Justify Seizure of Paper From Scientology Files
Church Sues F.B.I Agents for $7 million Dollars 
Scientologists Claim Raids, Seizure of Documents Were in Retaliation for Suits Against Goovernment
Scientology Battles
F.B.I raids on Church offices were part of drug investigations

If you Google FIB Scientology Raids it iwll show up... I think 11 top Scientology Officials were jailed ... had jail time based on this whole thing... the F.B.I conducted a raid of several Scientology Facilities.. I think it was 1977 ...
Newspaper Article
FBI agent prepared to drive knob through a door with a sledge hammer during a raid on Cedars complex ...
Newspaper article and photo
Scientology officials (from left) Hugh Withere,  Jeff Friendman and Rom Haugen address press conference... 
In that raid they found documents that exonerated people that Scientology had sued... and they found all this evidence of how Scientology had basically framed these people .. all sorts of dirty tricks ...  Ok.... that organisation is called the Office of Special Affairs Today ... and its ins Hollywood .. its on 63/31 Hollywood Boulevard  ... and that organisation is the one the hires the lawyers ... they hire private investigators ..


Question: Is it part of the Church?


Answer: Absolutely ...the people that work in the office of Special Affars are Sea Organization members ..... One thing that you've got to know about Scientology is that ..L Ron Hubbard ... wrote anything its in stone ... it can never be changed .... and  ..L Ron Hubbard ... wrote a policy that says that when somebody leaves Scientology and then is they attack Scientology or they speak badly about Scientology .. the policy is to destroy them utterly ...


Question: Is that public information to the members?


Answer: No..Its an internal policy..


Question: Right.. who has read that .. the 5,000 members that work for Scientology world wide ... 


Answer: Most of them probably have...


Question: And they know about it?
This is a common thing?
If they ever leave you have to desstroy them?


Answer: Even to a point ... there is a book that is caled the Ethics Book
An Intruction to Scientology Ethics by L. Ron Hubbard
and that book that any Scientologist can read.... anybody can reads it even if your not a Scientologist ... and in there it has crimes and high crimes and misdomenours ... and in that it talks about if you associate with a supressive person .. if you help a supressive person ... if you give a supressive person a platform to speak out ... these are High Crimes .... so either way .. this group .. the Office of Special Affairs .. one of theirt sole purposes is to destroy crtics of Scientology .... that's all they do .. they actually have graphs on their wall in their desk unit of how many Scientologists they have cut connections from these supressive persons ... 


Question: You may say that this is common in other religions as well .. likeI was part of a group and I watched what happen in front of my when a couple of people steped away from the Church ... their families turned against those two people ... it was very ugly when that happened.. and |i thought ...wow that was pretty ugly .. and then ... they used to be lifte up .. all because something happened .... 
Answer: There is one thing in Scientology is called disconnection ... 


What is Disconnection?
A Scientologist can have trouble making speritual progress in his audiig or training if he is connected to someone who is supressive or who is antagpnostic to Scientology or its tenets. All spititual advance gained from |Scientology may well be losy becaue one os continually invalidated by an antogolistic person 
 by a supressive person who wants nothing more than to do harm to tha person.
There are words for it in other religions ... so I leave ... and you don't want to talk to me anymore ... ok that's fine.... but when you call child services to try and get my ids taken away .... or you have private investigators camped outside my house  or ...
Question: Did this happen to somebody else ... or did that happen to you?


Answer: That happened to me.... 
 Child Services got an anomynmous tip ...that our kids were in danger ...  and Child Services showe dup to our house ... when we were working with the FBI in the investigation ... we gave al the information over ... about this  Child Services thing ..,. to the FBI .... without officially saying it ...,,
. they said ... yep they did that .... OK you can say other religions .. I do not know how many other religions have... have million and millions of dollars to pay private investigators to follow former members ..


Question:
Wel i will tell you this.... there is an individual that worked at Scientology's International Headquarters ...and he left in the 1980's .. and David Miscavige  .. this is documented ... this was reported on by the |Tamper Bay Times ...

Newspaper article and photo:
" IN my view the warrant ... invited agents to sieze any documents in the Church's files that struck their fancy ...  the sweep of that discretion is constututionally tollerable ... (Federal Justice William Bryant)

Tampa Bay Times
tampabay.com
The Truth Rundown
High-Ranking Defections say Scientology's leader Enforces Loyalty with beatings and Bullying... 
Two private invetstigators were paid by David Miscavige  adn they reported to David Miscavige  ... they watched this former Scientologist that worked in the Sea Orh International Base fp 25 years ... two private investigators ... that was their whole life ... they were paid milions and million ... just two guys were paid millions and millions of dollars to watch one single ex-Scientologist .... that's one..
Question: How important was that one...?
Answer:  He was the guy that David Miscavige  ... they have these levels in Scientology ... they have OT Levels ....
OT I
OT II
to
OT XV etc
to total freedom 
and you have hundreds of thousands of dollars to get to the top level ,,,
Question: How many levels ... I seen 15 levels .. I've seen 10 levels?
Answer: They have eight levels.. OK ... this guy that left ... David Miscavige  thought that this guy took levels 9 and 10 with him ...
because they don't have a 9 and 10 level ... 
L Romn Hubbard wrote a chart that goes from OT I to OT 15 ... but l Ron Hubbard only finishe dup to level 8 before he died... he himself only wrote up to either levels... they have been telling Scientologists that these levels 9 to 15 exist ... but they don't ...that's fiction .... but this guy that left ...David Miscavige  thinks that he took levels9 and ten with him ... because the guy that left worked with l Ron Hubbard .... 
Question:   So this was not a regular guy that left that they spent $25 million dollars on private investorgators to watch him ... this was a pretty influenntial guy that leeft Scientology .... so lets ..


Answer: Ether way ... you say its like other religions ....well I've worked there for 15 years and I've seen other things... don't get me wrong.... I've seen other horrible things that happens in other cults and in other religions .. but form working there for 15 years ... I can tell you that Scientology ... and Scientology has benn around since the 1950's   ... Scientology has spent 60 to 70 years perfecting this spy ops ... this black ops type of engagement against former members ... so ... there maybe other placed that do it .. but Scientology's Spy Operations are lowe level ... they know how to do stuff ..... 


Question: If you think about it ... ENRON .... ENRON is a very big compant ... multi million to multo billion dollar company ... they have some of the best lawyers ... the best lawyers than anybody else at that time ... they were still taken down ... you Google  various large comanies which are $50 billion dollar empires .... bigger than Scientology ,, bigger than a lot of other compant empires and it the proper investigation in done they still go down ... so how come it hasn't happened to Scientology?
I know that Scientology has 20 to 30 thousand members .... don't know the exact numbers ... you would know better than me ..


Answer: That's fairly accurate..


Question: 20 to 30 thousand members ... and the biggest name in probably To, Cruise and you have John TRavalta .. I know in the past Scienfield dabbled with it a little bit but says i was never part of it... I just took a few courses ... Brad Pitt used ot be there whern he used ot date a girl who used to be a bib scientologist .... he used to dabble with it a litle bit ... youi have some other names .. such as Katie Homes ... al these girls that were with Tom Cruise who used ot part of it ... one pf Tom Cruises ex wives that used to be part of Scientology that introduced Tom Cruise to Scientology ... she left Scientology ... Greta Van Sistrin is a Scietologist and she works for Fex News ... I don't know about John Travolta .. I dress like John Travolta Style from Saturday Night Fever ... when I wa sin the Army .. he has great taste ... and he knows how to dance ... but I do not know if I would put John Travolta as a genious ... I dont' think I would put him in that category ... 


Answer: John Travolta is not their best spokes person..


Question: I can tell you that om Cruise comes across as a very smart guy to me ... when i saw Tom's interview with Mat Louer and he's going bacdk and forward ... he made a come back in his career ... there's pasrt of that interview that shows that this guy in making sense and he's pushing Mat back and forward ... and Greta is not a dummy .. Gretta is a smart person ... so then if it is watch you say it is .. and you're not the only person that is saying tihis ...then whu have so many intelligent smart people been turned onto this this ... why is that ... is it jusy because of the power and the fame .. or is is just because the content of Scientology changed their lives... 


Answer: I explain it like this .. let's say you hae a relationship problem ...you just can't get into relationships... and you ... some Scientologist say  hey we have a course
Book : How to Improve Relationships with others
Based on the works of L. Ron Hubbard
that can help you with relationships ...


Question: Sure...
Answer: I aleardy know that that is a


Book: Creating A Successful Marriage 
Based on the works of L. Ron Hubbard  
they call this a Ruin.... something that you have in your life that you can't  figure out and you can't solve it .. theu then say that we have as course that will help you with that exact thing... its $50 buck.... $100 bucks. you do that course you find out that there another 10 thongs that are messed up with your life that you didn't know were messed up ... yo just wanted to sort out getting a girl friend...they wil now sell you another $5,000 worth of courses to handle those ten problems that you figured out .... 
Fast forward ... 15 years later ... your third divorse .... you've spent $500.000 dollars (half a million dollars) and you've brnn chasing this relationship thing ... that then turned into all this other stuff....  and it doesn't matter what your Ruin is ... Scientology has a course that will handle that Ruin .... if you're a person who is not good at communicating ... they have a communications course ... if you can't get along with your family ... they have a course called '... How to Get Along With Others ... 
they've isolated ... and this is the genious of L Ron Hubbard ... he isolate all these different aeas of life that people have problems with and they made all these $50 courses ... that's the cheese .... once they get you in the trap .., it just goes like that for ever .... all the way up to OTA .. its always a bate and switch ... al these these things ... they say that you've got these Aliens attached to you ... 


Question: So they are creating an imaginary problem and having a solution for te imaginary problem ... which is called the Egallion Dilectic .. which is ..
Theis ( Propositio) v Anti thesis (Counter Proposition) 
to reconciliation
to Synthesus ( New Thesis) v Antithesis (Counter-Proposition)
 to 
 reconciliation to 
Synthesis (New Thesis)
 I do not know if you are familiar with that..


Answer: I am and this is like the best part of it...
IT a set of cards .. this whole thing... but you build it...


Question: Right? it is an old tactic


Answer: They get you in.... then you build the house  of cards yourself... and your navigating all these problems that essentially that you've put in your own road block in front of you and their saying .. Oh ...this how we can get you though thta road block... and that's eseentially what happens ... now ... I've talked to Scientologists that have gone all the way up to OTA ... and their like Yeh.... I've got nothin ... if I could rewind and got rid of all that .. I'd right were I am right now .... you learn a lot of things in Scientology about yourself ... but most of those things you are prompted for you to say ... so ... they are trying to get your money... that's the bottom linr. their trying to get your money .. and they are alos trying to get you to get other people is .. so they can thodr people's money .... there's anothrer thing ... there are not as lot of poor Scientologists ... if you know people who are Scientology ..... most of those people thaat you know have money ... because  ... they don't need porr people ... they don't need people that don't have money ... because what are they going to do .. they are just going to do thaat $50 dollsr course and  thren what .. that's it ... OK ...tnat's not as good value for them to get in those sort of people ....  and L. Ron Hubbard in the 1960's ot 1970's actually wrote this program .. I think it was called Project Celebrity ...
It we are to do anything about the society at large, we must do something about its communication lihnes.
One of the parts of this plan is Projecy Celebrity.
There are many of hom America and the world listens. On the backs of these are carried most of the enthusiasms on which society runs. it is vital, on or Third Dynamic operation, to put such persons into wonderful condition.
It is obvious what would happem to America if we helped its leaders to help others. Project Celelbrity is part of that program. It is obvious what would happen to Scientology if prime communications benefitting from it would metion it now and then.
Herein you finf a list of celebrities. If you want one of these, write us ay omce, giving the ONE celebrity you have celected. We will then allocate this person to tou as your game.
Having been awarded one of these celebrities, it will be up to you to learm what you can about your quarry and them put yourself at every hand across his or her path, and not permittingdiscourasgements or "no's" or clerks or secretaries to intervene, in days or weeks or months, to bring your celebirty into formal auditing session and deliver an amount ofgood auditing necessary to (1) make him much more effective, and (2) make him aware of the benefits of Scientology on the Third Dynamic.
Finance, your pay, your expeneses on this hunt are up to you. OBviusly, at whatever future date, the investment will repay itself some doczen of times,
The HASI and HDRF will do this for you:
1. Award the celebrity to you as your quarry.
2. Restrain any other audor from bothering your game.
3. Gove you, tuition free, teo weeks of special coaching of the Hubbard Professional |College in Phoenix. (You would have to pay your transpory and living costs.)
4. Assist ny maining to the celebrity, your actions.
here we have Project Celebrity. Much later, as part of the Third Dynamic action of Scientology, we will have other comm-lines to take over. Just now we have these. They are powerful ines.
Thes celebrities are wull guared, well barricaded, over-worked, aloof quarry. If you brin one of them home you will get a small plaque as your reward. 
If you want one of these celebrities as your game, write us at once so the notable will be yours to hunt without interference.

They have done that every since... they get on celebrity in... then they get one or two other ones in and they get one or two other ones is and so on,...so even they only have 20 to 20,000 people in Scientology ... 5,000 of those are giving them a few million bucks each  year .. they don't pay these 5,000 people that work there ...  ther're not makling any money ... 
Question: When you worked  there ... what were you making... what were you making for 15 years... ?
Answer: I was getting... if you paid... it was about $50 bucks... er week... but taxes were taken out .... $46. bucks 24 cents a week ...


 Question: How much?


Answer:  $46. bucks 24 and 24 cents a week ...
what ever the SDA took out for tax..... but here's the the thing .. |i was working 120 hours per week..... e very week ... the schedule was aboiut 110 hours per week ... but we worked... sometimes we pulled all nighters.... sometimes we pulled multiple all nighters ...but it aaveraged out about 110 to 120 hours per week tha we worked ... 52 weks a year..


Question: When were you sleeping ... were you sleeping at the place..


Answer: Now they live in quarters right next door to where the work ..but at the time I worked there ... I lived just down the street from the compound...I was restricted to the property .. I was not allowed to leave the propert and for about a year I slept on my desk or in a closet ..


Question: So you didn't live at the compound?


Answer: I didn't live at the compound.... 

when I lieft there I got my social security statement... it showed \i made a totsl of $29,000 dollars for 15 years of workimg 120 hours a week 52 week per year,,

Scientology Aleister Crowley Tarot Card The rose-and-cross Tarot card developed by Satanist Aleister Crowley. Note the likeness with the Scientology cross.

Scientology E-Meter Are we having fun yet? Tell all your most intimate secrets to the E-Meter; it’s strictly confidential! Author William S. Burroughs, pedophile, occultist and suspected CIA asset had plenty of blackmail material handy.

Campos with burns caused by intense radiation

It was later revealed that Sargant worked for MI 5 and MI 6.

Starting in 1929, Ron Hubbard starts studying Scientology material. You can read about that in –
Scientology Roots Chapter Seven – The First Scientologists and Their Masters
1930 – Ron Hubbard enrolls in George Washington University where he studies civil engineering.
In 1931, Paul Linebarger was a student in the School of Engineering at George Washington University.
Paul Linebarger and Ron Hubbard met and became friends. The Hatchet was the college paper which had a supplement called the Literary Review, and Paul Linebarger was the editor. On 9 February 1932 Paul published Hubbard’s first story called “Tah”.   84,  85    

William Walters Sargant .Sargant experimented with numerous vicious drugs and drugs given in combination. He also performed leucotomies. Sargant spent 38 years butchering people with his horrific treatments.

Where is the missing wife of Scientology's ruthless leader? | 60 Minutes Australia
60 Minutes Australia 
Published on Feb 11, 2019
​https://youtu.be/P7QWifeY2_A

Shelly Miscavige is the wife of Scientology leader David Miscavige, the high priestess of Scientology who vanished 13 years ago. 60 Minutes investigate into the missing Queen’s whereabouts and speak to the former Scientologist’s who want answers. WATCH more of 60 Minutes Australia: https://www.60minutes.com.au LIKE 60 Minutes Australia on Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/60Minutes9 FOLLOW 60 Minutes Australia on Twitter: https://twitter.com/60Mins FOLLOW 60 Minutes Australia on Instagram: https://www.instagram.com/60minutes9 For forty years, 60 Minutes have been telling Australians the world’s greatest stories. Tales that changed history, our nation and our lives. Reporters Liz Hayes, Allison Langdon, Tara Brown, Charles Wooley, Liam Bartlett and Tom Steinfort look past the headlines because there is always a bigger picture. Sundays are for 60 Minutes. #60MinutesAustralia
​Type your paragraph here.

Puerto Rico became a United States possession at the end of the Spanish-American war.
Pedro Albizu Campos was the leading advocate for Puerto Rican independence.
Campos was elected president of the Puerto Rican Nationalist Party in 1930.  37

Dr. Cornelius P. Rhoads was doing medical research for the Rockefeller Institute at San Juan Presbyterian Hospital. In November 1931, when Rhoads was about to complete his research for Rockefeller, he wrote a letter that said:
…the Porto Ricans — they are beyond doubt the dirtiest, laziest, most degenerate and thievish race of men ever inhabiting this sphere. It makes you sick to inhabit the same island with them. What the island needs is not public health work, but a tidal wave or something to totally exterminate the population. I have done my best to further the process of extermination by killing off 8 and transplanting into several more. The matter of consideration for the patient’s welfare plays no role here — in fact, all physicians take delight in the abuse and torture of the unfortunate subjects.

When lab workers in the Presbyterian Hospital found the letter and photocopied it, all hell broke lose. The letter reached Campos, who displayed it for all Puerto Ricans to see, thus sparking a revolution amongst the Puerto Ricans. In January 1932, Campos published an article accusing Dr. Rhoads of killing Puerto Rican patients. Campos continued to make an international flap out of it.
Hubbard dropped out of college in 1932 and immediately went on an intelligence mission to Puerto Rico. He made two lengthy trips to Puerto Rico, which was a political nightmare at the time. The people in Puerto Rico were demanding independence.
The first cover story he used was he was going on a “Caribbean Motion Picture Expedition”. Hubbard rented the schooner Doris Hamlin and set sail on 24 June 1932. His final stopping point was Puerto Rico, where he got off the Doris Hamlin. Hubbard spent more than two weeks there in August 1932.  33, 34  Ship records show Hubbard departed San Juan on the SS Coamo on 25 August 1932.  35
Ron Hubbard’s second trip to Puerto Rico had the cover of him doing the “Puerto Rican Mineralogical Expedition”. Hubbard does this with a mining engineer named Joseph Buhrman Carper. Hubbard went to Puerto Rico on 26 October 1932, on board the USS Kittery. They spent a short time looking for gold in a river and the bulk of the time Hubbard was out gatherin
g intelligence on the people in Puerto Rico who were rebelling.

William Donovan

When he was trying to explain his radio-direction finding work while in Ketchikan, he is recorded in a radio program giving the explanation that:
…doing radio experimental work on beacon signals for the Navy Department, Fisher Research Laboratories, and the Cape Cod Instrument Company, I chanced to have some radio direction finders of high sensitivity. (Church of Scientology site “Clearing the Airwaves”; history of KGBU )
He didn’t “chance” to have such equipment. He was given it specifically for his trip and his real purposes there. Astor had been provided one for a similar intelligence mission that he had done where he was locating Japanese radio stations in the Marshall Islands

William Wiseman
After graduating from George Washington University, Paul Linebarger went to Oxford in England where he was groomed for his intelligence career.  84    
In the future, Paul Linebarger would be one of several CIA agents who helped Hubbard start Dianetics and Scientology. In addition to that, Linebarger and Hubbard worked for a CIA unit called Political Action Staff.
The head of that CIA unit was under Kermit Roosevelt junior whose father was a ROOM member.   86   

Intelligence Assignment in Puerto Rico
In 1932 Vincent Astor starts forwarding ROOM intelligence directly to Franklin Roosevelt.
Most early data concerned general conditions in the Caribbean and Panama Canal Zone.   30


November 1928 – Hubbard is leaving China, going back to Guam.
January 1, 1929 – Ian MacBean writes to Hubbard, calls him a lieutenant and says he has been retained. 16


Dear Red,
You’ll probably hear this officially soon but I want to let you know first. You’re still a Lieutenant. You’ve been retained in spite of all the fuss the Ambassador made.
Please come back…
Mac


A copy of Ian MacBean’s 1929 letter to L. Ron Hubbard was an exhibit in the Gerald Armstrong 1 trial.
We see from this that Ron Hubbard was hired by British intelligence and given the rank of Lieutenant.
It was to be his lifelong career…


Scientology Stage

Between 1932 and 1941 Hubbard traveled extensively in Central America.  


Roosevelt Meeting With Round Table

In 1932 Franklin Delano Roosevelt was elected President of the United States. Roosevelt immediately goes to meet with Round Table members at Cliveden.  45  Franklin Roosevelt then assumed office as American President from 1933 to 1945.
Starting in 1933, Vincent Astor served as the intermediary for intelligence gathered by ROOM members and their agents, forwarding intelligence directly to President Franklin Roosevelt.
Roosevelt went to the Nourmahal for rest, and to escape from the burdens of office during the early years of his presidency. “This is the only place I can get away from people, telephones and uniforms,” Roosevelt wrote a friend in 1934.  31

Waldorf and Nancy Astor. Waldorf Astor was an early member of the Round Table. He and his wife Nancy lived in an estate called Cliveden.

The ROOM

The ROOM was an outcropping of the previously formed Naval Reserves. The ROOM was the forerunner of the Office of Strategic Services – which was the forerunner of the Central Intelligence Agency.

Tanja Castle (David Miscavige's secretary) leaves Gold Base
SoUpstat Published on Jul 10, 2012


https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=JdHEh6toiWI
David Miscavige's secretary Source: http://abclocal.go.com/kabc/video?id=... Please support ABC's great journalism and visit the link above. http://abclocal.go.com/kabc/html5/vid... Dear ABC, please put this on YouTube under your official account When Ron Hubbard was a teenager he was recruited by British intelligence. Thereafter he executed one intelligence assignment after the other for his entire life. They groomed Hubbard to be the front man for their subjects of Dianetics and Scientology. You can read about that in Scientology Roots Chapter Seven – The First Scientologists and Their Masters. The common denominator that explains all of Hubbard’s actions in life …. Ron Hubbard told Scientologists to support the British New World Order. He advocates the worst sociopaths in the world having direct control over the life of every individual person.


http://www.awn.bz/Ron_Hubbard_GroomedByMI6.html
https://mikemcclaughry.wordpress.com/the-reading-library/scientology/scientology-roots/scientology-roots-chapter-twelve-1-hubbards-lifelong-intelligence-career/


The Tyranny & Violence of Scientology Leader David Miscavige 1 of 2


https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=BddkM-qcLvo


doyle63l5 Published on Nov 3, 2009 ABC Nightline News Broadcast - 22 October 2009 Part 1 of 2 ABCs feature on how David Miscavige abuses and Physically Assaults his staff. This includes testimony from, amongst others, former high-ranking scientologists Mike Rinder, Amy Scobee, Marty Rathbun and Bruce Hines.


Ron Hubbard on the left - Carper and Hubbard constructed a sluice. Hubbard said –
“After locating a likely spot, Carper built a test sluice from discarded boards, and we began the task of sluicing the Negro in hope of fabulous riches. The sluice itself was a simple affair—a twenty-foot box without a top, a foot deep and a foot wide…

Vincent Astor
Roosevelt as Assistant Secretary of the US Navy.Astor and Roosevelt had in common that their grandfathers became wealthy trafficking opium into China.
The grandfather of Franklin Delano Roosevelt, Warren Delano Jr., was chief of operations for Russell & Co., a Boston trading firm which did big business in the China opium trade in Canton. He first went to China at age 24 and spent a decade dealing opium on the Pearl River before returning to New York wealthy. He admitted in letters home that opium had an “unhappy effect” on its users, but argued that its sale was “fair, honorable, and legitimate,” akin to importing wine and spirits to America. Astor’s grandfather became wealthy from trading furs and trafficking opium.

Colonel Edward Mandell House Edward House helped Wilson get electedas US President and was Wilson’s closest adviser

Hubbard Recruited by British Intelligence
In April 1928 Hubbard drops out of high school and goes to meet his parents in Guam.
On 30 May 1928 Hubbard traveled to China aboard the Mariana Maru, without his parents along.
Ron Hubbard aboard the Mariana Maru – he is 17 years old
Hubbard apparently spent more than six months in China, because a journal entry in his diary on November 11, 1928 shows that he has left Peking, and is now at sea again.
This is the time when Hubbard’s British intelligence career gets officially going.
Major Ian MacBean worked for MI 6 in China. His wife was Phyllis Bedell and since childhood she was lifelong friends with Admiral Mark Kerr. His cousin was Philip Henry Kerr, a member of the Round Table who held top positions in British intelligence and he worked directly with Lord Robert Cecil. The point is – Major Ian MacBean had family connection right to the top of the British slavemasters.  57
Starting in June 1928, Hubbard gets trained by British intelligence man Ian MacBean, for the next six months.
An autobiographical excerpt by Hubbard:
I was up and down the China coast several times in my ‘teens from Ching Wong Tow to Hong Kong and inland to Peking and Manchuria. I had a very good friend in the British Legation in Peking, Major Ian MacBean who was an intelligence officer. My friends were very kind to me, even indulgent, and I was extremely fortunate in having the friendship of a great many older men. They found me a good listener.
Ian MacBean took Hubbard on a tour of British intelligence efforts from Peking through northern China.
From the L. Ron Hubbard website –
…among those encountered through the course of his second Asian venture… was a Major Ian MacBean of the British Secret Service. Precisely why this MacBean would take a seventeen-year-old L. Ron Hubbard through a tour of British intelligence efforts from Peking through northern China is not known. Nonetheless, and as we shall see, MacBean’s lessons were to serve Ron well.
http://adventurer.lronhubbard.org/page06.htm

Hubbard, in his own words in Dime Adventure magazine, October 1935 –
I completely missed the atmosphere of the city, devoting most of my time to a British major who happened to be head of the Intelligence out there.

Originally published in the February 1935 issue of Five Novels –
It was on Hubbards second journey to East Asia that he met British Secret Service agent, Major Ian MacBean, who introduced him to “The Great Game,” the geopolitical tug-of-war between China, Japan, and Britain.  

Aleister Crowley was an MI 6 agent who had the cover of being in the occult. Robert Cecil was his patron who had sent him to Cambridge University for training as a “diplomat”. So, Robert Cecil himself was who recruited Aleister Crowley for British intelligence. Aleister Crowley was a good friend ofl Ron Hubbard and they both worked for William Wiseman during World War I and helped with getting America into the war. In the 1920’s and 1930’s Crowley spied on Germans with occult interests. 

L. Ron Hubbard (left with John W. Cambell 

Creditable Claims that Ron Hubbard started Scientology as a front for MI6/MI5 and the CIA

Lts (jg) L. Ron Hubbard and Thomas S. Moulton in Portland, Oregon in 1943

L Ron Hubbard-In The USA in 1969

Former Scientologist Speaks
https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=kXwiNoywDLM

Mark Bunker
Published on Mar 1, 2016
7-24-99 I joined Barb and Zinjifar as they passed out fliers at the San Diego Gay Pride Parade with info on Scientology's view of homosexuality. We met a man who had joined the Sea Org for a year at L.A.'s Celebrity Center and he shared his experiences. www.xenutv.com

1982 CW Scientology Hearings - Ron DeWolf - Day 1
https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=elFdBCldOz4

Mark Bunker
Published on May 3, 2012
Ron DeWolf (L. Ron Hubbard Jr.) was the son of Hubbard and worked very closely with his father during the growth of Scientology in the 1950's. He had a very rocky relationship with his dad and ultimately wound up testifying against him in court. Playlist of Full Hearings: http://www.youtube.com/playlist?list=...

1982 CW Scientology Hearings - David Ray - Day 3

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=RdqOTg5bCI0&t=155s
Mark Bunker
Published on May 3, 2012
David gives a blow by blow account of what is was like to join the Sea Org and discover the harsh realities of life among the "elite crew" of Scientology. Playlist of Full Hearings: http://www.youtube.com/playlist?list=...

L Ron Hubbard in Los Angeles, 1950

It was later revealed that Sargant worked for MI 5 and MI 6.

L. Ron Hubbard’s Great-Grandson Reveals Horrifying Truth About Scientology

https://newspunch.com/l-ron-hubbard-scientology/

July 18, 2017 Sean Adl-Tabatabai News, US

L.Ron Hubbard’s great-grandson, Jamie DeWolf,  has spoken out against Scientology and its founder, revealing the dark and disturbing truth about the biggest cult in the world.
Scientology has a history of silencing its critics. If you want to know why they are so desperate to stop insiders from speaking out, look no further than Jamie DeWolf.
In the video below, you will learn about Hubbard’s family story, how L. Ron had vowed to con everybody he came in contact with, and the numerous death threats Ron and the Church issued to those who dared criticise it.


https://youtu.be/0QsCrFANMzc

Transcript:
Host: I’m excited about this one. This is going to make history. Our next guest, a poet, writer, filmmaker, educator, photographer. I’m leaving stuff out. Brother is amazing, and you are in for a treat. I’m in for some trouble, and you’re about to find out why. Mr. Jamie DeWolf.
Jamie DeWolf: Every family has their black sheep. On my mother’s side, our black sheep was a shepherd who enslaved his own flock, the king of cons, a man who made himself a messiah even though he never called himself a god. Even tonight, his words are written in steel, in titanium capsules, in a nuclear reinforced bunker miles underground. So if our whole species goes extinct, his words will still survive. He was a subject we never talked about at the kids’ table at family reunions, but he was my great grandfather, L. Ron Hubbard.
Lafayette Ron Hubbard, he was born a storyteller, a science fiction writer, a golden tongued grifter who could write a book in any genre while the publisher waited downstairs in the hotel lobby. Just another name on dime store pulp mags paid only $0,01 a page until 1949 when he said, “You want to know how you really get rich? You start a religion.”
A year later, he kept to his word, wrote “Dianetics,” transforming science fiction into fact until you could pay to flat line your mind for a fee. Overnight, he went from pennies to a prophet until the world demanded to see his evidence. But L. Ron knew if you don’t have facts, all you need is faith. So he transformed his science into a religion, and Scientology was born.

A few years later, his son arrived, a baby who survived an early abortion attempt, born premature at two pounds, two ounces, abandoned by his father as he sought fame and fortune. Now he emerged to take his part of the new family business. He was my grandfather, L. Ron Hubbard Jr.

Carrying his father’s name and his red hair, Junior became his right hand man and was a devout disciple and a believer, helping them to construct the church. It took him years to realize he was only another accomplice. Trained in the arts of electrified hypnotism, blackmail and beat downs, he learned to hide his crimes behind his charisma. And it took him a decade to see the holes behind the holy, the man behind the myth, his father, stuffing thousands of dollars in a shoe box he kept secret underneath the bed. His father, burning incriminating documents before dawn. His father, escaping criminal charges as he ran from state to state as Junior watched his family and friends, brains washed, banks broken.

Sickened by what he had seen behind the curtain, in 1959, Junior left. But his Father always understood retribution better than redemption, and he stalked his son with wiretaps, break ins and death threats, my grandfather coming home to photographs of his children in his mailbox playing on playgrounds alone and unguarded to remind him the eye of the pyramid never blinks. While every one of my aunts and uncles were taught how to use a gun, the son forced to live like his dad, permanently on the run until he changed his last name from Hubbard to DeWolf, a lie to protect him from every having to tell the truth.

When your father has created a religion in your lifetime, there’s no sun big enough to ever escape his shadow. But there’s a thin line between prophecy and psychosis, and the bare faced messiah run from countries and criminal charges, an international outlaw on a ship escaping extradition, his sanity slipping as he started confusing his past from his fiction. Until one day, he vanished before a courtroom or a jail cell could ever make him real again.

Junior, now buried under debt, tried to flush his father out of hiding to write him a check. So he litigated the holy ghost to prove he still had flesh. The son took his war public, scraped the idol’s gold down to rust. Junior, now a dying diabetic with an amputated foot, buried and battered from a decade of lawsuits against the man who carried his same name until the day his dad died in hiding, cremated the next morning, leaving only a legacy of ashes.

The church gave the son on final offer. Arrest your tongue, swallow the truth for one final check, or you and your next of kin will suffer a lifetime of threats. So he signed away his silence and took his secrets and two heart attacks to his grave, another victim the church stopped pretending to save.

On Thanksgiving in a house a self-made god paid for, his grand children never said his name. He was the one god we never gave grace to. One day, my grandfather led me to a bookshelf and showed me his father’s works. And he said, “Your mom says you want to be a writer. Well, don’t believe everything you read, but believe everything you say.”
I never met the man who gave me my red hair. The manic depression is still twisted in the strains of my DNA. And the first time I saw a psychiatrist. when he asked me if mental illness runs in my family, all I could say was, “Yes. Yes it does.” When I told him my great grandfather was a cult leader that enslaved the minds of millions, he accused me of having delusions of grandeur. What can I say? It runs in my veins.

I’ve been, in secret, to L. Ron Hubbard Hollywood Life Exhibits, where his latest victim leads me on a tour of a life he never led, my family written out of existence. And this disciple will never know the legacy of lies that I still carry in my last name. DeWolf, a cover story to protect us from my great grandfather’s true children, the army of empty who greet me in train stations with an E-meter and a personality test. And they ask me if I’ve ever heard of L. Ron Hubbard. And I want to ask them, “Which one? The son or the father? The god or the man?”

L Ron Hubbard in his early days of  working for MI5/MI6 and the CIA - "..MI-6 Are The Lords of The Global Drug Trade It may be a revelation to many people that the global drug trade is controlled and run by the intelligence agencies. In this global drug trade British intelligence reigns supreme.,,," ,,James Casbolt.  Please take the time to read the full paper written by James Casbolt further down this wikipediaexposed.org web page  and also read  http://www.wikipediaexposed.org/wikipediaexposed_featurenewsstories_p.1.html

L Ron Hubbard's wife Sara at a 1951 custody hearing

ASIC PRINCIPLE
THE A-R-C TRIANGLE
Affinity—Reality—Communication


https://www.freedommag.org/magazine/201702-the-data-demon/basic-principle/the-arc-triangle.html

IN THIS COLUMN 

We present a fundamental of the Scientology religion researched and developed by L. Ron Hubbard.

The Scientology religion, founded by L. Ron Hubbard, offers a precise path leading to a complete and certain understanding 
for oneself of one’s true spiritual nature and one’s relationship to self, family, groups, mankind, all life forms, the material universe, the spiritual universe and the Supreme Being.

A tool of considerable importance in Scientology and one that greatly assists interpersonal relationships is the principle of affinity, 
reality and communication. These three interdependent factors may be expressed in a triangle—the A-R-C Triangle.
The first corner of the triangle is affinity, which is the degree of liking or affection or lack of it. It is the feeling of love or  liking for something or someone.
The second corner of the A-R-C Triangle is reality, which could be defined as “that which appears to be.” Reality is fundamentally agreement. 

What we agree to be real is real.
The third corner of the triangle is communication, defined as “the interchange of ideas or objects between two people.” 
In human relationships this corner is more important than the other two corners of the triangle.
The interrelationship of the triangle becomes apparent at once when one asks, “Have you ever tried to talk to an angry man?” 
Without a high degree of liking and without some basis of agreement, there is no communication. 
Without communication and some basis of emotional response, there can be no reality. 
Without some basis for agreement and communication, there can be no affinity.
Thus these three things form a triangle. Unless there are two corners of a triangle, there cannot be a third corner. 
Desiring any corner of the triangle, one must include the other two.
The A-R-C Triangle is not equilateral. Affinity and reality are much less important than communication. 
It might be said that the triangle begins with communication, which brings into existence affinity and reality.
Great importance is placed in Scientology on the factor of communication, as Scientologists know that communication is 
the bridge to higher states of awareness and happiness.

L_Ron_Hubbard1958_L. Ron Hubbard-Scientology will thrive when medical doctors are reined in

Hana Eltringham Whitfield - L Ron Hubbard's Ship Captain - Secret Lives - Scientology - Dianetics
https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=qw-At2NNyZo
Keeping.Skepticism.Working

Published on Apr 23, 2015
Hana Eltringham Whitfield - L Ron Hubbard's Sea Organization Ship Captain & Loyal Officer Secret Lives Scientology Dianetics This video is uploaded with the intent of educating the public regarding Scientology and its belief structure and to help preserve the tech for future generations. Uploaded in the spirit of Fair Use Copyright Act of 1976, 17 U.S.C. § 107. All credit for the video goes to its original creator. All rights are reserved by the copyright holder.
Category Science & Technology

L. Ron Hubbard. 

The materials of Dianetics and Scientology comprise more than 35 million spoken and written words of the religion’s founder L. Ron Hubbard. 

“That bitch Paulette Cooper!”
Those were the choice words belted out by Scientology founder L. Ron Hubbard back in 1974 as he pounded on his desk while playing Commodore aboard his yacht, the Apollo. Photo Illustration by The Daily Beast

By 1974, the author  Paulette Cooper wears the stress of her ordeal in her pained visage.

John Whiteside "Jack" Parsons (born Marvel Whiteside Parsons) was a friend on L Ron Hubbard worked with L Ron Hubbard in the various  Intelligence Services    https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Jack_Parsons_(rocket_engineer) born on the October 2, 1914 – June 17, 1952) was an American rocket engineer and rocket propulsion researcher, chemist, and Thelemite occultist. Associated with the California Institute of Technology (Caltech), Parsons was one of the principal founders of both the Jet Propulsion Laboratory (JPL) and the Aerojet Engineering Corporation. He invented the first rocket engine to use a castable, composite rocket propellant, and pioneered the advancement of both liquid-fuel and solid-fuel rockets. Born in Los Angeles, Parsons was raised by a wealthy family on Orange Grove Avenue in Pasadena. Inspired by science fiction literature, he developed an interest in rocketry in his childhood and in 1928 began amateur rocket experiments with school friend Ed Forman.  Please read more about the life and times of John Whiteside "Jack" Parsons further down this page.

Ketchikan, Alaska, where Hubbard and his wife were stranded during the -Alaskan Radio-Experimental Expedition-

The sluice constructed by Carper and Hubbard

Major Ian MacBean - MI6 British Intelligence had worked for MI6 in China  Starting in 1928 Hubbard gets trained by Major Ian McBean for the next six months, whose wife was Phyllis Bedell and since childhood she was lifelong friends with Admiral Mark Kerr. His cousin was Philip Henry Kerr, a member of the Round Table who held top positions in British intelligence and he worked directly with Lord Robert Cecil. The point is – Major Ian MacBean had family connection right to the top of the British slavemasters. 

The Unbreakable Miss Lovely: How the Church of Scientology tried to destroy Paulette Cooper (w/ Q&A)

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=V7KadY1UKsE

Carl Wong
Published on May 20, 2015

Introduction by Jim Underdown: 0:00 Tony Ortega and Paulette Cooper: 5:43 Q&A from audience: 40:04 In 1971, a magazine freelancer in New York named Paulette Cooper came out with her first book, “The Scandal of Scientology”, and it was the first popular book that gave the public a view into this secretive organization. She nearly paid for it with her life. What even Paulette didn't know at the time was the extent that Scientology and its founder, L. Ron Hubbard, would go to destroy someone it perceived as an enemy. By 1973, Paulette had been framed in an elaborate plot involving fake bomb-threat letters, and she faced 15 years in federal prison if convicted. Newly unearthed documents show that by that time, Scientology had kept her under tight surveillance for several years and proposed many ways to destroy her reputation and life. She was finally exonerated after the FBI raided Scientology in 1977 and found those documents, which referred to her by the code name "Miss Lovely." Eleven top Scientology officials went to prison after that raid, but more than 30 years later, Scientology is still around -- and so is Paulette. In his new, and first, book, “The Unbreakable Miss Lovely”, journalist Tony Ortega tells Paulette's story in full for the first time, with eyewitness accounts and new documents which describe the full extent of her ordeal -- and her continued fight against a group now seriously in decline. For the launch of the book, Paulette will be appearing with the author at a limited number of events as they talk about various parts of her life depicted in the book, from her childhood survival of the Holocaust to her much calmer life in Florida with her husband Paul, as well as the latest developments in the controversies facing Scientology today. Ortega is the executive editor of The Raw Story, a progressive political news site. From 2007 to 2012, he was editor in chief of The Village Voice, and he's been investigating and writing about Scientology since 1995, when he was a reporter for the Phoenix New Times. He also wrote for or edited weekly newspapers in Los Angeles, Kansas City, and Fort Lauderdale. Originally from Los Angeles, he lives in New York and maintains a breaking news website about Scientology news, "The Underground Bunker." He is also featured in “Going Clear”, Alex Gibney's documentary about Scientology, which first aired on HBO in March. Recorded on May 17, 2015 at the Center for Inquiry in Los Angeles, California. Find out how to become a Contributing Member of CFI here: http://www.centerforinquiry.net/la/ge
... Cameras, sound and editing by Carl Wong. https://www.youtube.com/c/carlwong5 Buy me a cup of coffee for $1 at http://bit.ly/1Htl0BS

Unfortunately, we sometimes pay a terrible price for it.
First Edition Copy of The Scandal of Scientology


https://www.collectorsweekly.com/stories/182735-first-edition-copy-of-the-scandal-of-sci

This first edition of The Scandal of Scientology, a Tower Book, was written by Paulette Cooper and was released to the public in 1971. It goes much more in depth than the story the author wrote of the same name, that was printed in Queen Magazine in the UK. This book sold about 154,000 copies, but now it is really hard to find a copy anywhere because of the majority of copies being bought and destroyed. And, if you do find a copy you will pay much much more than the original price of $.95.

I bought this copy from Abebooks a few years ago. The picture of the book that the seller put up, even though what people are looking for are first editions on the website, was the book with the banner that says, "The Book that Scientology tried to stop!". That banner was not placed on the first printing of this book, it was placed there with the later printings. But, the price the seller wanted was really low, much much lower than what people usually ask for when selling a copy of this book. And most copies for sale are not the super rare first edition, they are later printings and most were found at book sales from libraries. Those books have the library card pockets in them and may also have had writing.

I had looked for this book here and there over the past 8 or 9 years just in case I found one in my price range with no luck until I found this one on Abes. So, I bought the book from the seller with the knowledge that the picture of the book had the banner, which told me that it was not a first edition and I was OK with that.
When I got the book, I was suprised to see it really was the super rare first edition. It was also in really great shape, the book looks brand new and the only thing that tells of the book's true age are the yellowed pages. The one time I opened it a little bit after I got it was to look at the page that shows the printing information, and I let the cover close right back up after. I then put the book in plastic and put it behind glass. It has been opened one other time years later by someone, and that was by the author herself when she signed this book for me. She verified that this is a first edition as well.
It took me a while to ask the author if she would sign my copy, when I did she said yes. She asked me how I wanted her to sign, and I told her that Tony Ortega has it right. He came out with a book about Paulette Cooper last year, called The Unbreakable Miss Lovely. It is the story of what happened to Mrs. Cooper-Noble after the release of this book. I asked her to sign my copy of her book that way, she really is a lovely woman inside and out. And the fact that she came through being falsely implicated as a terrorist, only vindicated because of the raid from the FBI in July 1977, and came out whole is amazing. She endured that and more, she found out that people who said they were her friends were actually plants that reported her every move to those that falsely said she was a terrorist. She came through all of that and went on to write more books and has been happily married since.
With the book back safely, signed by the author, it has been wrapped and placed back behind glass in one of my curio cabinets.

 L. Ron Hubbardwho fronted for MI5/MI6/CIA to establish what is now known as the Church of Scientology
Ron Hubbard told Scientologists to support the British New World Order. He advocated the worst sociopaths in the world having direct control over the life of every individual person. MI5/MI6/CIA groomed Hubbard to be the front man for their subjects of Dianetics and Scientology. You can read about that in Scientology Roots Chapter Seven – The First Scientologists and Their Masters.

​The same year that Andrews started the idea of Scientology, the Cecil family took up the idea. In 1871, Arthur Balfour and his in-laws form a private group to study paranormal phenomena. Psychiatrist Josef Breuer was treating Bertha Pappenheim in the summer of 1880.
He found that when she recalled a series of memories back to a traumatic memory, one of her many symptoms would disappear. Breuer drew two important conclusions from his work with Bertha: that her symptoms were the result of thoughts that were buried in her unconscious and that when these thoughts were spoken and became conscious, the symptoms disappeared. Breuer called this catharsis therapy. It was also called abreactive therapy and talking therapy. Catharsis or abreactive therapy – The process of bringing repressed ideas and feelings into consciousness. It is the reliving of past traumatic incidents buried in the subconscious. Sigmund Freud began using this cathartic treatment under Breuer’s guidance. In 1882, Arthur Balfour created the Society for Psychical Research. They conducted scientific research into mental and spiritual phenomena. They developed the subjects of Dianetics and Scientology. All the basic mental, spiritual, and religious ideas in Dianetics and Scientology were developed by the SPR, before L. Ron Hubbard was even born. That includes the therapy used. Sigmund Freud was a member of the Society for Psychical Research. The SPR also conducted extensive research into catharsis therapy. The subjects of Dianetics and Scientology were tied together from the beginning and both subjects were underneath the Cecil family, which means underneath British intelligence. When Ron Hubbard was a teenager he was recruited by British intelligence. Thereafter he executed one intelligence assignment after the other for his entire life.

MI-6 Are The Lords of The Global Drug Trade
by James Casbolt
from JamesCasbolt Website
https://www.bibliotecapleyades.net/sociopolitica/sociopol_drugs

It may be a revelation to many people that the global drug trade is controlled and run by the intelligence agencies. In this global drug trade British intelligence reigns supreme.

As intelligence insiders know MI-5 and MI-6 control many of the other intelligence agencies in the world (CIA, MOSSAD etc) in a vast web of intrigue and corruption that has its global power base in the city of London, the square mile. My name is James Casbolt, and I worked for MI-6 in 'black ops' cocaine trafficking with the IRA and MOSSAD in London and Brighton between 1995 and 1999
My father Peter Casbolt was also MI-6 and worked with the CIA and mafia in Rome, trafficking cocaine into Britain. My experience was that the distinctions of all these groups became blurred until in the end we were all one international group working together for the same goals. We were puppets who had our strings pulled by global puppet masters based in the city of London. Most levels of the intelligence agencies are not loyal to the people of the country they are based in and see themselves as 'super national'.
It had been proved beyond a shadow of a doubt that the CIA has been bringing in most of the drugs into America for the last fifty years (see ex LAPD officer Michael Rupert's 'From the wilderness' website for proof).


The CIA operates under orders from British intelligence and was created by British intelligence in 1947.


The CIA today is still loyal to the international bankers based in the city of London and the global elite aristocratic families like the Rothschild's and the Windsor's. Since it was first started, MI-6 has always brought drugs into Britain. They do not bring 'some' of the drugs into Britain but I would estimate MI-6 bring in around ninety percent of the drugs in.


They do this by pulling the strings of many organized crime and terrorist groups and these groups like the IRA are full of MI-6 agents.
MI-6 bring in heroin from the middle east, cocaine from south America and cannabis from morocco as well as other places. British intelligence also designed and created the drug LSD in the 1950's through places like the Tavistock Institute in London. By the 1960's MI-5, MI-6 and the CIA were using LSD as a weapon against the angry protestors of the sixties and turned them into 'flower children' who were too tripped out to organize a revolution.

Dr Timothy Leary the LSD guru of the sixties was a CIA puppet. Funds and drugs for Leary's research came from the CIA and Leary says that Cord Meyer, the CIA agent in charge of funding the sixties LSD counter culture has "helped me to understand my political cultural role more clearly".

In 1998, I was sent 3000 LSD doses on blotting paper by MI-5 with pictures of the European union flag on them. The MI-5 man who sent them told my father this was a government 'signature' and this LSD was called 'Europa'.
This global drugs trade controlled by British intelligence is worth at least 500 billion a year. This is more than the global oil trade and the economy in Britain and America is totally dependent on this drug money.


Mafia crime boss John Gotti exposed the situation when asked in court if he was involved in drug trafficking.
He replied "No we can't compete with the government".


I believe this was only a half truth because the mafia and the CIA are the same group at the upper levels. In Britain, the MI-6 drug money is laundered through the Bank of England, Barclays Bank and other household name companies. The drug money is passed from account to account until its origins are lost in a huge web of transactions.

The drug money comes out 'cleaner' but not totally clean. Diamonds are then bought with this money from the corrupt diamond business families like the Oppenheimers.
These diamonds are then sold and the drug money is clean. MI-6 and the CIA are also responsible for the crack cocaine epidemic in Britain and America. In 1978, MI-6 and the CIA were in south America researching the effects of the natives smoking 'basuco' cocaine paste. This has the same effect as crack cocaine. They saw that the strength and addiction potential was far greater than ordinary cocaine and created crack cocaine from the basuco formula.


MI-6 and the CIA then flooded Britain and America with crack.

Two years later, in 1980, Britain and America were starting to see the first signs of the crack cocaine epidemic on the streets. On august 23, 1987, in a rural community south of Little Rock in America, two teenage boys named Kevin Ives and Don Henry were murdered and dismembered after witnessing a CIA cocaine drop that was part of a CIA drug trafficking operation based at a small airport in Mena, Arkansas.
Bill Clinton was the governor of Arkansas at the time. Bill Clinton was involved with the CIA at this time and $100 million worth of cocaine was coming through the Mena, Arkansas airport each month.
For proof see the books 'Compromise' and 'Dope Inc'.
On my father's international MI-6 drug runs, whatever fell off the back of the lorry so to speak he would keep and we would sell it in Britain. As long as my father was meeting the speedboats from Morocco in the Costa del Sol and then moving the lorry loads of cannabis through their MI-6, IRA lorry business into Britain every month, British intelligence were happy.
As long as my father was moving shipments of cocaine out of Rome every month, MI5 and MI6 were happy. If my father kept a bit to sell himself no one cared because there was enough drugs and money to go round in this £500 billion a year global drugs trade. The ones who were really paying were the people addicted. Who were paying with suffering.
But karma always catches up and both myself and my father became addicted to heroin in later years and my father died addicted, and poor in prison under very strange circumstances. Today, I am clean and drug-free and wish to help stop the untold suffering this global drugs trade causes.
The intelligence agencies have always used addictive drugs as a weapon against the masses to bring in their long term plan for a one world government, a one world police force designed to be NATO and a micro chipped population known as the New World Order. As the population is in a drug or alcohol-induced trance watching 'Coronation Street', the new world order is being crept in behind them.
To properly expose this global intelligence run drugs trade we need to expose the key players in this area:
Tibor Rosenbaum, a MOSSAD agent and head of the Geneva based Banque du Credit international. This bank was the forerunner to the notorious Bank of Credit and Commerce international (BCCI) which is a major intelligence drug money laundering bank. 'Life' magazine exposed Rosenbaum's bank as a money launderer for the Meyer Lanksky American organized crime family and Tibor Rosenbaum funded and supported 'Permindex' the MI6 assassination unit which was at the heart of the John F. Kennedy assassination.
Robert Vesco, sponsored by the Swiss branch of the Rothchilds and part of the American connection to the Medellin drug cartel in Colombia.
 Sir Francis de Guingand, former head of British intelligence, now living in south Africa (and every head of MI5 and MI6 has been involved in the drug world before and after him).
 
Henry Keswick, chairman of Jardine Matheson which is one of the biggest drug trafficking operations in the world. His brother John Keswick is chairman of the bank of England.
Sir Martin Wakefield Jacomb, Bank of England director from 1987 to 1995, Barclays Bank Deputy Chairman in 1985, Telegraph newspapers director in 1986 (This is the reason why this can of worms doesn't get out in the mainstream media. The people who are perpetrating these crimes control most of the mainstream media. In America former director of the CIA William Casey was, before his death in 1987, head of the council of the media network ABC. Many insiders refer to ABC as 'The CIA network.)
George Bush, Snr, former President and former head of the CIA and America's leading drug baron who has fronted more wars on drugs than any other president. Which in reality is just a method to eliminate competition. A whole book could be written on George Bush's involvement in the global drug trade but it is well-covered in the book 'Dark Alliance' by investigative journalist Gary Webb.
Gary Webb was found dead with two gunshot wounds to the back of his head with a revolver. The case was declared a 'suicide'. You figure that out. Gary Webb as well as myself and other investigators, found that much of this 'black ops' drug money is being used to fund projects classified above top secret.

These projects include the building and maintaining of deep level underground bases in,
Dulce in New exico
Pine Gap in Australia
Snowy mountains in Australia
The Nyala range in Africa
west of Kindu in Africa
next to the Libyan border in Egypt
Mount Blanc in Switzerland
Narvik in Scandinavia
Gottland island in Sweden,
...and many other places around the world (more about these underground bases in my next issue).
The information on this global drugs trade run by the intelligence agencies desperately needs to get out on a large scale.
Any information, comments or feedback to help me with my work would be greatly welcomed.
 

In 1882, Arthur Balfour created the Society for Psychical Research. They conducted scientific research into mental and spiritual phenomena. They developed the subjects of Dianetics and Scientology. All the basic mental, spiritual, and religious ideas in Dianetics and Scientology were developed by the SPR, before L. Ron Hubbard was even born. That includes the therapy used.
Sigmund Freud was a member of the Society for Psychical Research. The SPR also conducted extensive research into catharsis therapy. The subjects of Dianetics and Scientology were tied together from the beginning and both subjects were underneath the Cecil family, which means underneath British intelligence.

When Ron Hubbard was a teenager he was recruited by British intelligence.
Thereafter he executed one intelligence assignment after the other for his entire life.
They groomed Hubbard to be the front man for their subjects of Dianetics and Scientology. 
You can read about that in Scientology Roots Chapter Seven – The First Scientologists and Their Masters.
The common denominator that explains all of Hubbard’s actions in life ….
Ron Hubbard told Scientologists to support the British New World Order.
He advocates the worst sociopaths in the world having direct control over the life of every individual person.

Wikipedia Exposed Media - WEM www.wikipediaexposed.org

FREEDOM TO PROVIDE FACTS, INFORMATION, OPINION AND DEBATE WIKIPEDIA EXPOSED MEDIA - TRUTHFUL NEWS MEDIA, ENCOURAGE OPEN DEBATE