The Claremont Serial Trial - The Podcast
Prime Suspect’s Knife Sent to the FBI  2020-03-25

https://www.podbean.com/media/share/dir-xc3zx-867dcbc?utm_campaign=w_share_ep&utm_medium=dlink&utm_source=w_share 

Just as day 62 of the Claremont serial killings trial was ending, drama erupted in the courtroom.
Coronavirus-related drama.
Justice Hall hauled a security staff member into the courtroom after it emerged some pensioners and students were banned from entering the court.
He told the security their actions, which were approved by the court’s general manager could amount to contempt of court, saying,

“I take this extremely seriously. The public has been discouraged from attending but not excluded." And "No one is to be excluded from this court other than by my order.”
During proceedings, former forensic police officer Victor Webb gave evidence, who told the court knives owned by the prime suspect at the time - Lance Williams’ - was sent to the FBI along with Jane Rimmer and Ciara Glennon’s hair and clothes.
Despite finding nothing, police still pursued him, overtly and round the clock, for years.
It wouldn’t be until 2008 that Lance Williams would be cleared.
Along with MACRO exhibits, exhibits from operation Ambrose - the investigation into the murder of Gerard Ross was sent to the FBI too.
In 1999 the FBI had technology that WA didn’t - that’s why the samples were sent there. WA police also sought the advice from the best entomologists and profilers in the world.
They stayed there until 2001, and what would come out of it would be the critical fibres that the prosecution say link Ciara Glennon, Jane Rimmer and the Karrakatta rape victim to Bradley Robert Edwards

Join Tim Clarke, Natalie Bonjolo and criminal defence lawyer Damien Cripps as they discuss day 62.
If you have any questions for the podcast team, or any of their guests, send them to 

claremontpodcast@wanews.com.au

Expert lists the items Australians need to stock up on before coronavirus becomes a global pandemic leading to mass shortages and empty shelves

By CHARLIE COË FOR DAILY MAIL AUSTRALIA
26 February 2020

https://www.dailymail.co.uk/news/article-8044051/Stark-warning-Australians-stock-food-supplies-coronavirus-pandemic.html  

From dried foods to toilet paper and drinking water - expert lists the items you need to stock up on before coronavirus becomes a global pandemic leading to mass shortages and empty shelves
Coronavirus has killed more than 2,200 people worldwide and infected 80,000
New hot spots have emerged in South Korea, Italy and Iran as the virus spreads
Supermarket shelves in some Italian towns emptied as coronavirus crisis grows 
Survival expert said Australians should start building good supply of dried foods
Root vegetables, dried fish and separate water supply will help during shortage 
Coronavirus symptoms: what are they and should you see a doctor?



Australians need to start stocking up on food and supplies before the spread of the deadly coronavirus becomes a global pandemic and stocks of required goods start to run low, a survival expert has warned.
While the vast majority of the 80,000 infections have been within China, 37 people have died in South Korea, Italy and Iran as the new hot spots emerged in the past week for COVID-19.
One of Australia's leading survivalists said the nation's shoppers should start bulking up their weekly shop before the virus' spread leads to food supply shortages.  
'We should always be prepared for food shortages - not just from coronavirus but civil incidences, extreme weather and power outages which will cut us off from supply,' Western Australian survival instructor Bob Cooper told Daily Mail Australia on Wednesday.
Stockpiling by panicked shoppers has already seen shelves emptied in Italian towns at the centre of the country's outbreak in the northern Veneto and Lombardy regions. 
Mr Cooper said it was too early for such panic here but said Australians should start thinking about whether their food cupboards can sustain them if the supply chain is broken.
'You need to think about things that have a long shelf life: dried fruit, dried foods, cereals, pasta will also last a long time,' he said.
'Packets of flour will also allow to make your own bread.'
The survival expert said shoppers should be prioritising vegetables rather than protein, as the former should make up 80 per cent of our diet.

FOOD AND HOUSEHOLD ITEMS TO STOCKPILE IN A PANDEMIC
Extra prescription medications, asthma relief inhalers 
Over-the-counter anti-fever and pain medications 
Feminine hygiene products
Family pack of toilet paper
Vitamins 
Alcohol-containing hand rub
Household cleaning agents and soap 
 Tissues, paper towel
Cereals, grains, beans, lentils, pasta
Tinned food – fish, vegetables, fruit
Oil, spices and flavours
Dried fruit and nuts
Ultra-heat treated or powdered milk 
Soft drink or candy/chocolate for treats 
Pet food and care

 Source: Virology Down Under by University of Queensland virologists Dr Ian Mackay and Dr Katherine Arden

'Things like root vegetables can be sun-dried and re-hydrated and last up to six months. I've tested it with bananas and fish as well,' he said. 
Mr Cooper said even more important than food is keeping a supply of your own drinking water in case the supply runs out.
'No-one is gonna die of starvation - it might get hard - but that should be the least of your priorities,' he said. 'You need to have your own water supply though.' 
University of Queensland virology expert Ian Mackay has also compiled a thorough list of items Australians should stockpile in a box labelled 'pandemic stash'
As well as food items, included in the list are feminine hygiene products, over-the-counter medication, toilet paper and pet food if required.
The Australian government is preparing a contingency plan should the spread turn into a pandemic - a development which would be declared by the World Health Organisation.
'Every part of the health system is now working on its plan so that we're ready if things develop further in the future,' chief medical officer Brendan Murphy said.   
It comes as Australia's federal sports minister warned the nation's athletes could be pulled out of the Tokyo Olympics in July as the coronavirus continues to spread globally. 
'Australian athletes are ready to make their mark at the Tokyo Olympics - but it should not be at the risk of their health and well-being,' sports minister Richard Colbeck said.
'We continue to work with the relevant authorities both here and overseas to ensure our athletes remain safe and protected as the response to the coronavirus continues.'
Australian athletes can also choose on an individual basis whether to compete in Tokyo.
The government's chief medical officer Professor Brendan Murphy said it was unclear how safe Japan would be for those travelling to the Games at this stage. 
'We still haven't seen the full impact of the Diamond Princess outbreak - we're making a daily evaluation of the effects,' he said. 
The worrying government comments follow Australian Olympic Committee president John Coates saying last week that organisers found no case for postponing or cancelling the Games.
In the past week, it emerged seven people had died and 229 are infected after an outbreak of the virus in Italy. 
A third Victorian passenger from the Diamond Princess cruise ship has tested positive for COVID-19, bringing the state's total number of cases to seven, chief health officer Brett Sutton confirmed.
The trio were repatriated to Victoria and are recovering in isolation.
Four people who previously tested positive for the virus in Victoria have recovered, the state's health department said.

CORONAVIRUS CASES IN AUSTRALIA: 25
NEW SOUTH WALES: 5

January 25 
Three men aged 43, 53, and 35 who had recently travelled to China contracted the disease.
Two flew in from Wuhan while the other arrived in Sydney from Shenzhen, south China.
They were treated in isolation at Westmead Hospital

January 27 
A 21-year-old woman is identified as the fourth person to test positive for the illness in NSW.
The woman, a student at UNSW, flew into Sydney International Airport on flight MU749 on January 23 and presented to the emergency department 24 hours later after developing flu-like symptoms.                                                                                                  

VICTORIA: 7
January 25

A Chinese national aged in his 50s becomes the first confirmed case of the coronavirus in Australia.
The man flew to Melbourne on China Southern flight CZ321 from Wuhan via Guangzhou on January 19.
He was quarantined at Monash Hospital in Clayton in Melbourne's east.

January 29
A Victorian man in his 60s is diagnosed with the coronavirus.
He became unwell on January 23 - two days after returning from the Chinese city of Wuhan, the epicentre of the outbreak. 
 The man was confirmed as positive on January 29 and was subsequently seen by doctors at the Monash Medical Centre.     

 January 30
A woman in her 40s is found to have coronavirus. 
She was visiting from China and mostly spent time with her family.
She is being treated at Royal Melbourne Hospital.          

February 1
A woman in her 20s in Melbourne is found to have the virus 

 February 22 
Two passengers taken off the Diamond Princess cruise ship test positive

February 25
Third passenger taken off the cruise ship tests positive

QUEENSLAND: 9
January 2

Queensland confirms its first case after a 44-year-old Chinese national was diagnosed with the virus. He is being treated at Gold Coast University Hospital.

January 30
A 42-year-old Chinese woman who was travelling in the same Wuhan tour group as the 44-year-old man tests positive. She is in Gold Coast University Hospital in stable condition.  

February 4
An eight-year-old boy was diagnosed with coronavirus. He is also from the tour group where the other Queensland cases came from    

February 5  
A 37-year-old man, who was a member of a group of nine Chinese tourists in quarantine on the Gold Coast, also tested positive

February 6
A 37-year-old woman was diagnosed with coronavirus from the same travel group that flew to Queensland from Melbourne on January 27February 21                                                        
Two Queensland women, aged 54 and 55, tested positive for COVID-19 and will be flown to Brisbane for further treatment. 
A 57-year-old woman from Queensland also tested positive for the virus.  
 February 28                                                                                                                                         
 A 63-year-old woman was confirmed to have the virus after returning to the Gold Coast from Iran.

SOUTH AUSTRALIA: 3
February 1

A Chinese couple in their 60s who arrived in Adelaide from Wuhan to visit relatives are confirmed to have coronavirus.
A 24-year-old woman from South Australia was transferred to Royal Adelaide Hospital

WESTERN AUSTRALIA: 1
February 21

A 78-year-old man from Western Australia was transferred to Sir Charles Gairdner Hospital in Perth. On February 28, he was taken into intensive care in a 'serious' conditionDIAMOND
PRINCESS CRUISE SHIP: 8
Of the 23 overall cases in Australia, eight contracted the disease on the Diamond Princess cruise ship, which had gone into quarantine in the Japanese port of Yokohama
They tested positive for the coronavirus after arriving at the Manigurr-ma Village Howard Springs facility in Darwin, and are now being treated in their home state
A Chinese couple in protective masks and plastic coats shop in Beijing on February 11. A survival expert said shoppers in Australia should start preparing their cupboards for a food shortage


Chief medical officer Brendan Murphy (pictured) said the Australian government is preparing for the coronavirus spread to become a pandemic  


The virus has infected 80,000 - including 690 passengers on board the Diamond Princess cruise ship in Japan. Pictured are passengers disembarking the ship on February 21 after a two-week quarantine ended  


Empty shelves are pictured in a supermarket near Milan in Italy's coronavirus-hit Lombardy region. Survival instructor Bob Cooper warned against panic buying but said Australians should start buying certain dried foods  

The Claremont Serial Trial Podcast- The FBI Connection  2020-03-24
The Claremont Serial Trial - 
The FBI Connection  2020-03-24

https://www.podbean.com/media/share/dir-r67ei-86556d0?utm_campaign=w_share_ep&utm_medium=dlink&utm_source=w_share  

WA’s trial of the century will likely take a couple of days off each week in an effort to try and limit the amount of time the lawyers, witnesses and police are in the room.It’s been a fast changing process of how this important trial can continue through the COVID-19 crisis, all the players are working together to try and get a result, as well as stay safe. Justice Hall told the court “We will pull together”

That means streamlining the witnesses.
Today, three forensic scientists took the stand, giving evidence about the search for clues from the bodies Jane Rimmer and Ciara Glennon, and the clothes of Ciara and the Karrakatta rape victim.
One of the former forensic officers told of how police were so desperate for clues, they sent the hair masses of Jane and Ciara to the FBI to expert hair analysts, as Tim Clarke explains, they were world leaders at the time in fibre analysis.
Another scientist, Bernard Lynch told the court he analysed the Karrakatta rape victim’s shorts, looking for carpet fibres - fibres which would have been from the car the perpetrator used when he abducted her, but he didn’t find anything.
What was found almost two decades later, was a blue fibre, which the prosecution say belonged to blue Telstra shorts Bradley Edwards wore.

Join Natalie Bonjolo, Alison Fan and Tim Clarke as they take you through day 61 of the trial, and day 2 of the fibre evidence.
If you have any questions for the podcast team, send them in to claremontpodcast@wanews.com.au

Senate coronavirus vote delayed after Rand Paul pushes doomed amendment Sen. Chuck Schumer called the Paul amendment "ridiculous" and "a colossal waste of time"
March 18, 2020, 4:03 PM GMT
By Julie Tsirkin and Dareh Gregorian

https://www.nbcnews.com/politics/congress/senate-coronavirus-bill-vote-delayed-after-rand-paul-pushes-doomed-n1162356 

Senate leaders were scrambling Tuesday to pass coronavirus legislation as quickly as possible, but Sen. Rand Paul put a damper on those plans, two leadership sources told NBC News.
Senators were heading toward a vote on the package — which would include provisions for free coronavirus testing, secure paid emergency leave, enhance unemployment insurance, strengthen food security initiatives and increase federal Medicaid funding to states — but they had to slam on the brakes because of an amendment Paul proposed.
The sources said Paul is forcing a vote on his amendment, which would "require a social security number for purposes of the child tax credit, and to provide the President the authority to transfer funds as necessary, and to terminate United States military operations and reconstruction activities in Afghanistan."
Senate Majority Leader Mitch McConnell agreed to take up the amendment Wednesday, delaying the vote on the larger bill, the sources said. The Paul amendment is not expected to pass. The Senate is also planning to vote on the House bill later Wednesday.

Ahead of the vote Wednesday, Senate Minority Leader Chuck Schumer, D-N.Y., blasted the Paul amendment as "a colossal waste of time."
The House bill "must pass the Senate today but unfortunately, first we must dispose of a Republican amendment that would make a condition of the bill to require the president to terminate military operations in Afghanistan. Yes you heard me right!" Schumer said on the Senate floor. "In a time of national emergency this Republican amendment is ridiculous, a colossal waste of time. We probably could have voted on this bill a day or two ago if not for the need to schedule this amendment."
McConnell, Kentucky's senior senator, said Tuesday that a number of his members think that the package the House passed Saturday has "considerable shortcomings" but that it is still necessary and urgent.
"My counsel to them is to gag and vote for it," he said.
"We're able to rise above our normal partisanship and many times our normal positions because these are not ordinary times. This is not an ordinary time," he said.
Paul was the sole "no" vote on the $8.3 billion coronavirus spending bill the Senate passed earlier this month.
Paul is notorious for forcing votes on amendments he knows will not pass.
In July, Paul blocked a bipartisan bill that would ensure that a victims' compensation fund related to the terrorist attacks of Sept. 11, 2001, never runs out of money. Paul questioned the bill's 70-year time frame and said any new spending should be offset by corresponding cuts. After the amendment failed, he wound up being one of two no votes on the legislation.
He even briefly caused the government to shut down in 2018, using a procedural tactic to block the Senate from meeting the deadline to keep the government open because he objected to the price tag

Sen. Rand Paul, R-Ky., responds to reporters on Capitol Hill on Jan. 8, 2020.J. Scott Applewhite / AP file

Sarah Spier, Ciara Glennon and Jane Rimmer- The Claremont victims

 Gotti’s Hitman Exposes The Dark Side of Mafia
Valuetainment
Former Mafia enforcer John Alite does a sit down with Patrick Bet-David to talk about how he became the Gotti Family's enforcer and how he's still alive to talk about it. Order the book The Darkest Hour: https://amzn.to/2kx5B5g Order the book Gotti's Rules https://amzn.to/2lDmStF GQ Magazine article: https://www.google.com/amp/s/www.gq-m... There are many life lessons to learn from someones story. Subscribe to Valuetainment for all future notifications http://bit.ly/2aPEwD4 and to see who shows up on Valuetainment next. About John Alite: John Edward Alite also known as Johnny Alletto is an Albanian-American former Gambino family associate, informant and motivational speaker. He was an associate of the Gambino crime family and John A. Gotti. Music selection used through agreement with Epidemic Sound http://bit.ly/2B8DxK1 Subscribe for more content and interviews - http://bit.ly/2aPEwD4 Visit the official Valuetainment Store for gear: https://www.valuetainmentstore.com/ About Valuetainment: Founded in 2012 by Patrick Bet-David, our goal is to impact entrepreneurs around the world through value and entertainment. We are the #1 channel for entrepreneurs because of the best interviews, best how to videos, best case studies and because we defend capitalism and educate entrepreneurs. Follow Patrick on social media: Website: http://www.patrickbetdavid.com Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/PatrickBetDa... Instagram:https://www.instagram.com/patrickbetd... Twitter:https://twitter.com/patrickbetdavid Linkedin: https://www.linkedin.com/in/patrick-b... Category: Education

Sarah Spier, Ciara Glennon and Jane Rimmer- The Claremont victims

CLAREMONT Serial Killer  Trial Podcast
Unlike DNA, Fibres CAN Fly Around the Room 
 2020-03-23

https://www.podbean.com/media/share/dir-47bv8-862a9fc?utm_campaign=w_share_ep&utm_medium=dlink&utm_source=w_share 
 
After a 10-day break, WA’s trial of the century resumed - with strict and widespread cleaning and social distancing measures to ensure this mammoth trial can continue.
Compared to previously in the trial - when the public gallery was packed to the point a separate room was set aside for overflow - one person from the public was in court.
And what they heard was the beginning of the fibre evidence, which focussed on Jane Rimmer’s hair mass.
Fibres are critical to the prosecution to link Ciara Glennon’s fingernails - which they say contained Bradley Edwards’ DNA - to Jane Rimmer and the Karrakatta rape victim.
Without any DNA evidence linking Jane to the accused, or any DNA evidence at all, the prosecution say 22 critical fibres were found in Jane’s hair, which came from specially made Telstra pants that Bradley Edwards would have worn in the mid 90s.
They say those fibres got there through Bradley Edwards taking Jane in his car, and getting close enough to her when he was killing her.
The defence, however say contamination is also the way those fibres got into Jane’s hair mass.
If you’re just joining the trial now, you can start from season 2, episode 1, or our special two-part catch up, called JUMP IN NOW: Claremont the Trial Catch Up Part 1 and 2.
If you have any questions about the trial for any of the guests, send them in to claremontpodcast@wanews.com.au
Join Natalie Bonjolo, Tim Clarke and Forensic expert Brendan Chapman as they discuss day 60.

Sarah Spier, Ciara Glennon and Jane Rimmer- The Claremont victims

Wikipedia Exposed Media - WEM www.wikipediaexposed.org

FREEDOM TO PROVIDE FACTS, INFORMATION, OPINION AND DEBATE WIKIPEDIA EXPOSED MEDIA - TRUTHFUL NEWS MEDIA, ENCOURAGE OPEN DEBATE

Claremont serial killings trial of Bradley Edwards cut short as court adopts coronavirus measures 
By Andrea Mayes
23rd March 2020

https://www.abc.net.au/news/2020-03-23/claremont-serial-killings-trial-cut-short-coronavirus-measures/12081950


The Claremont serial killings trial is likely to be shortened by more than a month after defence lawyers agreed to allow testimony from 20 witnesses to be read into the court rather than requiring them to give evidence in person.
Bradley Robert Edwards, 51, is on trial for the wilful murders of Sarah Spiers, 18, and Jane Rimmer, 23, in 1996, and 27-year-old Ciara Glennon in 1997.


The young women all went missing late at night from Claremont, in Perth's western suburbs, where they had been out drinking with friends.
Ms Spiers's body has never been found, but the bodies of Ms Rimmer and Ms Glennon were found at opposite ends of the metropolitan area, weeks after they vanished.
State prosecutor Carmel Barbagallo told the court an agreement had been reached with the defence team over the 20 witness statements, which meant the state's case against Edwards would be wrapped up in about five weeks' time.
Edwards will then have the opportunity to testify, although it is unclear whether he plans to do so or not.
It was previously anticipated the trial would wrap up some time in June, but Ms Barbagallo's comments suggest it will likely finish late next month or early in May.

Court hears fibres found on two victims' hair
The trial was sitting for the first time for nearly a fortnight after an adjournment to allow time for defence counsel Paul Yovich to consider the latest report from the prosecution's fibre expert.
Fibres were found in the hair of both Ms Glennon and Ms Rimmer, and prosecutors say they match fibres found on Edwards's clothing and car.
Photographs of Ms Rimmer's hair were shown to the court for the first time today, something Justice Stephen Hall only allowed because none of the families of the victims were present in court.
On previous occasions during the trial, the judge ordered physical barriers be erected in court when sensitive material was shown, preventing those in the public gallery and media benches from seeing it.
Ms Rimmer's curly brown hair appeared matted and damp, with debris and dirt clearly visible in it.
Senior Sergeant George Paton told the court he had taken the hair mass from secure storage at the Special Crime Squad offices in October 2009 and taken it to PathWest, where it was examined by a team of biologists and chemists, the latter from the ChemCentre.
He said the hair had been divided into five parts and was "systematically and methodically" examined over four days, with items of interest carefully recorded.
The prosecution alleges crucial fibres were found in Ms Rimmer's hair, fibres that matched those from Edwards's Telstra-issued work car and clothing.

Gallery quiet after COVID-19 outbreak
Public interest in the case remained high throughout the first four months of the trial, with the public gallery often near capacity and occasionally full.
But today, following the announcement of formal coronavirus social distancing measures, the only people in the public gallery were Edwards's parents and a handful of plain-clothed police officers from the Claremont investigation.
Bottles of hand sanitiser and packets of antibacterial wipes were visible in court, although Justice Hall said supplies were running low.
He said his "ever resourceful" associate had tried to manufacture some for the court given the shortage, but with only "limited success".
But Justice Hall said extra cleaning precautions were being taken, including disinfecting the witness box in-between witnesses, limiting the number of people allowed in the courtroom and allowing witnesses to testify from home if they wished.
Ms Barbagallo last week told a hastily convened court hearing to establish procedures for the continued running of the trial in the wake of the coronavirus pandemic that at least one witness was in self-isolation already, and many others were elderly and had concerns about travelling into the court.
The trial is scheduled to continue tomorrow 24th March 2020

Sarah Spier, Ciara Glennon and Jane Rimmer- The Claremont victims

'I felt like I had a belt around my chest': Rep. Ben McAdams shares details after testing positive for coronavirus
REBECCA SHABAD
Mar 19th 2020 - NBC News

https://www.aol.com/article/news/2020/03/19/i-felt-like-i-had-a-belt-around-my-chest-rep-ben-mcadams-shares-details-after-testing-positive-for-coronavirus/23955425/ 


WASHINGTON — Rep. Ben McAdams, D-Utah, who has tested positive for the coronavirus, said Thursday that it feels like "worst cold I've ever had" and that any members of Congress who had close contact with him since Friday should be concerned.
“What I've been told by the House physician is that anyone who had close contact with me from Friday onward should be should be concerned and should probably take precautions,” McAdams said in an interview on NBC’s “TODAY” show.
McAdams said there aren’t a lot of members who would be in that category, but the “few members that I had contact with in that period probably should be quarantined.”
The Utah Democrat said started feeling sick Saturday afternoon, but only mildly so. His doctor didn’t think his symptoms — a temperature of 100 and a cough — justified getting tested for COVID-19. But then he took a “turn for the worse” from Monday night into Tuesday, when he had a temperature of 103 and his lungs were really constricted, he said.
“I felt like I had a belt around my chest, and so I couldn't breathe deeply,” said McAdams, whose doctor then recommended that he get tested.
Besides McAdams, Rep. Mario Díaz-Balart, R-Fla., has also tested positive, and a number of other House members have said they are self-quarantining because they they had contact with someone who tested positive.
Having all of these absent members “does place a limit on the ability of Congress to get stuff done right now,” McAdams told "TODAY." House rules don’t allow members to vote remotely, but he said, “I think we need to consider changing that” under emergency situations.

CORONAVIRUSAMERICANS STUCK IN PERU OVER CORONAVIRUS FEARS URGE U.S. TO BRING THEM HOME

https://www.nbcnews.com/news/world/americans-stuck-peru-over-coronavirus-fears-urge-u-s-bring-n1164316?icid=recommended 
 
More from NBC News:
Two members of House test positive for COVID-19

https://www.nbcnews.com/politics/politics-news/two-members-house-test-positive-covid-19-n1163511 
 
Trump signs off on coronavirus aid bill

https://www.nbcnews.com/politics/congress/senate-plans-vote-house-coronavirus-bill-wednesday-n1162851?cid=sm_npd_nn_fb_ma&fbclid=IwAR2gzXTf483RkCbWDomd89cJHr2eN3C9TYOGIu9RAoKO2NuiJGPFOAqxz2g 
 
Senate coronavirus vote delayed after Rand Paul pushes doomed amendment  

https://www.nbcnews.com/politics/congress/senate-coronavirus-bill-vote-delayed-after-rand-paul-pushes-doomed-n1162356  

Paul Yovich SC, is representing Bradley Robert Edwards in court.
 Paul Yovich SC stated at the beginning of the trial of Bradley Robert Edwards ... that his client's simple defense is that his client is not guilty of the murders of  Sarah Spiers, Jane Rimmer and Ciara Glennon, and that the prosecution have to produce the evidence that proves beyond reasonable doubt that Bradley Robert Edwards is guilty of the murders of  Sarah Spiers, Jane Rimmer and Ciara Glennon ... and can not just try and fit the evidence to a theory ...

"..... the only alleged evidence that it seems the prosecution have to rely on to try and convict Bradley Robert Edwards, .....  is the alleged DNA of Bradley Robert Edwards found in an alleged DNA test made in the United Kingdom of Ciara Glennon's DNA .... after DNA tests of Ciara Glennon's DNA in Perth, Western Australia and New Zealand did not find the DNA of Bradley Robert Edwards with Ciara Glennon's DNA ..... with all the claimed evidence that no one could have interfered with Ciara Glennon's DNA at PathWest and/or at the New Zealand Testing Place ..... there was every opportunity for Ciara Glennon's DNA to be interfered with by the two people who were made responsible for taking Ciara Glennon's DNA to the UK for testing ... these two people are:
(a) Laurie Webb CIA-MI6_Asset .... who was sacked by PathWest for not following the right procedures for DNA Tests the correct way
and 
(b) Detective Sergeant James Stanbury-CIA-MI6_Asset ....  who  has been accused of being derelict in his duties by ignoring scraping noises from the cell of a prisoner being questioned over another murder, despite the fact the man was a suicide risk.

So what the Western Australian Police did was give the possession of the most important material evidence in the murder investigation of Ciara Glennon being 


​Ciara Glennon's DNA .... to two people who have shown that they could well be corrupt .. who one would have no trouble believing that they would accept a large bribe and/or some other benefits .. or even just to protect the system by satisfying the families of the victims and the general public, the police, and other powerful people in their same network they mix in, to solve the problem that they need to find a way to charge someone with the murders of  Sarah Spiers, Jane Rimmer and Ciara Glennon ....  it would be extremely easy for a senior ex-PathWest Scientist to use some of Bradley Robert Edwards's DNA to add to Ciara Glennon's DNA before it was tested in the UK ..... there are many other features of the evidence presented by prosecution at the trial of Bradley Robert Edwards that in fact help prove the possible innocence of Bradley Robert Edwards of the murders of  Sarah Spiers, Jane Rimmer and Ciara Glennon ...... there is material evidence and material witnesses that seem to have deliberately not been presented at the trial of Bradley Robert Edwards ...... and misleading evidence at the trial of Bradley Robert Edwards ..... it seems that the trial of Bradley Robert Edwards and the evidence and information presented at the trial of Bradley Robert Edwards is more of an inquest into the disappearance and/or murders of Sarah Spiers, Jane Rimmer and Ciara Glennon, rather than a trial ....... which is creating many more questions than answers....... with a lot of material information, evidence and witnesses deliberately not presented by Prosecutor Carmel Barbagallo. for acts for the Western Australian Police Service, Director of Public Prosecutions for Western Australia and the State of Western Australia at the trial of Bradley Robert Edwards ... which seems the way the trial has proceeded has been partly done to help protect the powerful people that Sarah Anne McMahon stated were involved in the murders of  Sarah Spiers, Jane Rimmer and Ciara Glennon .. and not only is wasting millions of dollars of money provided by the people of Western Australia ..... it is also a serious criminal contempt of court for Prosecutor Carmel Barbagallo. for acts for the Western Australian Police Service, Director of Public Prosecutions for Western Australia and the State of Western Australia at the trial of Bradley Robert Edwards ... not to present all possible
material information, evidence and witnesses at the trial of  Bradley Robert Edwards ....".... NYT CSK Investigation Team.

CLAREMONT Serial Killer Trial Podcast- The Sensitive Operation -03-30- 2020
https://www.podbean.com/media/share/dir-89gcm-8735b17?utm_campaign=w_share_ep&utm_medium=dlink&utm_source=w_share  

On Day 64 of the Claremont Serial Killings trial, two forensic police officers detailed how they painstakingly sifted through Jane Rimmer’s hair mass 13 years after her post-mortem.
It was a sensitive operation for two reasons.
After being in frozen storage for more than a decade, Jane’s hair mass was extremely brittle, and still had icicles on it.
But these officers were very aware they were sifting through the hair of a murdered woman.
As forensic expert Brendan Chapman explains in this epsidode, while collecting and retaining a hair mass during a post-mortem is common, actually testing a hair mass isn’t - because mostly, it’s taken as a, what he called the “one per center” a “last resort” exhibit to examine.
Through his experience, cases tend to get solved before sifting through a hair mass is needed.
But this was a “one per center” case, and the prosecution would say that one per cent chance of testing paid off.
The prosecution say 22 fibres, 20 of which the prosecution say matched a white commodore station wagon Bradley Edwards had access to at the time, and 2 which they say match specially-made Telstra pants worn by the accused in the 90s were found in Jane Rimmer’s hair.
Join Natalie Bonjolo, Tim Clarke and forensic expert Brendan Chapman as they discuss day 64 of the Claremont Serial Killings trial.

Sarah Spier, Ciara Glennon and Jane Rimmer- The Claremont victims

Bradley Robert Edwards and Prosecutor Carmel Barbagallo.

The Claremont Serial Killer  Trial Podcast 
The Good Old Fashion Police Work that Changed WA History 
 2020-04-06

https://www.podbean.com/media/share/dir-arkhh-88465b0?utm_campaign=w_share_ep&utm_medium=dlink&utm_source=w_share 
The police officer who went digging for the fingerprints that would blow the Claremont Serial Killings investigation wide open give his evidence today. Sgt Colin Stuart Beck took the stand to tell his massive involvement in one of WA’s most infamous cold cases, how his good old fashioned police work finding fingerprints from a series of break-ins, which led to fingerprints linking the Claremont cases to Huntingdale cases, and the database match with threw up the name Bradley Robert Edwards. All of these links, however didn’t have any DNA evidence. That’s when WA police set up an undercover operation to follow Bradley Edwards. Long-time listeners of the podcast and the case will remember in late December 2016, Bradley Edwards went to the movies. He had no idea police were watching his every move. He dropped a Sprite bottle into the bin as he left, police picked that bottle up and it was immediately sent to the lab. Police waited anxiously for the results, which eventually showed an exact match to Huntingdale and Karrakatta, and a match that couldn’t be ignored for Ciara. The podcast team take you through the details of Sgt Beck’s evidence - from the phone call of a DNA match, to the arrest of Bradley Edwards and the searches of four houses linked to him, through to finding clothes from the 90s to compare to fibres found in Jane and Ciara’s hair, and the car Bradley Edwards drove in 1996 and 1997. As always, Bradley Edwards is innocent until proven guilty, and this evidence is the prosecution’s way of trying to prove whether he is the Claremont Serial Killer. Join Natalie Bonjolo, Tim Clarke and forensic expert Brendan Chapman as they discuss day 68. If you have a question for the podcast team or any of their guests, send them in to 
Claremontpodcast@wanews.com.au  

A Chinese couple in protective masks and plastic coats shop in Beijing on February 11. A survival expert said shoppers in Australia should start preparing their cupboards for a food shortage

CLAREMONT Serial Killer The Trial  
Bonus Episode: How COVID-19 Could Impact on CLAREMONT Serial Killer The Trial

https://www.podbean.com/media/share/dir-6uw73-854830a?utm_campaign=w_share_ep&utm_medium=dlink&utm_source=w_share

Bonus Episode: How COVID-19 Could Impact the Claremont Trial
2020-03-17

We’re in an unprecedented time, a confusing time.
As we’re being asked to self-isolate and work from home to try and stop the spread of Coronavirus, there are many professions where that simply isn’t possible.
Shops, cafes and restaurants may close, but hospitals, police stations, any emergency services can’t stop.
And the justice system - for the moment can’t either.
This week, Western Australia, like many other states and countries, announced that no new jury trials will be listed for three months, to try and protect any potential jurors.
Our legal expert Damien Cripps tells us what impact that will have on trials, the backlog that’s expected to happen - and for us, what that will mean for the Claremont Serial Killings trial.
Fortunately, the Claremont trial is judge-alone, but what will happen if some of the lawyers, a witness, the judge, or even the accused Bradley Edwards gets sick?
Can the public still watch the trial?
Will the media be allowed in to bring you the details?
Natalie Bonjolo, Tim Clarke and Damien Cripps explore those questions in this bonus episode of Claremont in Conversation.

CLAREMONT Serial Killer Trial Podcast - 
The Trial Travels to China  2020-04-02

https://www.podbean.com/media/share/dir-ws4eu-87ad3a3?utm_campaign=w_share_ep&utm_medium=dlink&utm_source=w_share 
With a video link to China, technical difficulties plagued the morning’s proceedings. When the technical issues were sorted, day 67 took a deep dive into fibres, VIN numbers and cars. Tim Clarke says in this episode, you would have had to be a car buff for the day’s evidence to keep you interested and focussed the whole day. Luckily, Tim Clarke was in court all day and takes us through the most important aspects of the day. A former Holden manufacturer, who told the court the particular colours of the fibres of the car - found in Jane and Ciara’s hair - were only found in that make and model of car. It was a narrowing down exercise today, narrowing down the chances that the car police found could be the car which Jane and Ciara were in, and possible take to where they were killed. Join Natalie Bonjolo and Tim Clarke as they discuss the day’s evidence, and make it easy to understand. Send any questions you have for the podcast team to

claremontpodcast@wanews.com.au 

The Claremont Serial Trial Podcast  - 
The Trial Must Go On  2020-03-26

https://www.podbean.com/media/share/dir-xprjj-86a116f?utm_campaign=w_share_ep&utm_medium=dlink&utm_source=w_share  

Despite the coronavirus outbreak, the judge presiding over the Claremont Serial Killings trial, Justice Hall effectively told the court on day 63 that the trial must go on.
At the end of the shortened day for the cross examination of former forensic police officer Victor Webb, Justice Hall told the court he is prepared to make changes to the process to allow witnesses to give evidence from home.
But for day 63, former forensic police officer Victor Webb was grilled by the defence about storage and transfer of critical exhibits, as well as the car he drove in the 90s.
As Tim Clarke and Emily Moulton explain, the defence will try to argue that instead of the critical fibres linking Bradley Edwards to Jane Rimmer and Ciara Glennon through his Telstra car and shorts, instead, they were found on the victims through contamination and fibre transfer.
It’s previously been revealed several police officers drove police cars, some of of which were commodore station wagons to the crime scenes of Jane Rimmer and Ciara Glennon, as well as to the morgue during their post-mortems, where the bodies were placed on a sheet on the floor.
But the prosecution say the fibres got there from the women being in the car driven by Bradley Edwards.
The prosecution also argue he didn’t necessarily have to be wearing his Telstra uniform at the time of the murders, instead, some fibres from his Telstra shorts stayed in the car, and transferred onto the women while they were in his car.
Join Natalie Bonjolo, Tim Clarke and Emily Moulton as they take you through day 63.
Send in ny questions you have for the podcast team to claremontpodcast@wanews.com.au

CLAREMONT Serial Killer Trial Podcast
The Last Thing Jane and Ciara Could Have Ever Seen  2020-04-01

https://www.podbean.com/media/share/dir-hxk86-8785097?utm_campaign=w_share_ep&utm_medium=dlink&utm_source=w_share 
 
Could the inside of the Holden Commodore VS series be the last thing Jane Rimmer and Ciara Glennon ever saw before they were killed? It was revealed CSI took three days to dismantle and examine the Holden Commodore that Bradley Edwards drove in 1996 and 1997. Hundreds of exhibits were taken from the car - ChemCentre looking for fibres, PathWest looking for biological material, police looking for investigative clues, polilight exams, swabs, mats, seat covers and door panels taken away. Anything that could be examined, was. Even though the car was assigned to Bradley Edwards in April 1996, the witness today - CSI officer Acting Senior Sergeant Steven Mark told the court they still looked for any signs of Sarah Spiers, who disappeared on January 26, 1996. Nothing from Sarah Spiers or DNA was found, but fibres were - and that’s what this car brings to the case. The prosecution say the seat fibres were found on Jane Rimmer and Ciara Glennon. So, what is the importance of this car and fibres to this case? Criminal defence lawyer Damien Cripps says in other criminal trials, fibres are used in evidence to make sure every stone is turned in the investigation. Fibres may not be the most important exhibits in the trial, but they are physical links between Bradley Edwards and the two women. More than 90 photos of the car were shown to the court, and have been released to the public. As Tim Clarke explains in this episode, the last photo is probably the most interesting because it shows a piece of the puzzle that can’t be seen with the naked eye. Those photos can be seen on thewest.com.au. Join Natalie Bonjolo, Tim Clarke and Damien Cripps as they discuss day 66 of the Claremont Serial Killings trial. If you have any questions for the podcast team, or any of their guests, send them in to claremontpodcast@wanews.com.au. 

Federico and Paola Capasso were in Peru when the country shut its borders.Courtesy of Federico and Paola Capasso

Sarah Spier, Ciara Glennon and Jane Rimmer- The Claremont victims

The Claremont Serial Killer Trial 
Looking For a Needle in a Haystack  2020-04-14


https://www.podbean.com/media/share/dir-tx6ne-8979f1e?utm_campaign=w_share_ep&utm_medium=dlink&utm_source=w_share  

Today in court we found out a world-first fibre database was created specifically for the Claremont Serial Killings trial, which led to a ground breaking new way of investigating fibres now used as the standard method of fibre matching. The scientists who were testing the fibres found in Jane Rimmer and Ciara Glennon’s hair saw that they looked similar to those found in cars. So, they took off their lab coats and went out into the field, specifically wrecking yards, the police compound and tested cars - though trial and error. After years of finding fibres, testing and ruling them out, they finally found their needle in a haystack - the fibres were strikingly similar to those found in a Holden Commodore Stationwagon VS 1 or 2. The incredibly detailed work was done by scientists who had to cross reference more than 4000 fibres they found on the victims. The scientists literally had to take each fibre one-by-one and look at them through a microscope to compare to the MACRO fibres - and they did it in the hopes of finding a match - they didn’t have anything to cross reference, until December 2016. We previously heard scientists spend 11 days combing through Bradley Edwards’ former Telstra car, and even longer testing the fibres. As we’ve heard before, 41 critical fibres were found in Ciara Glennon’s hair, and 22 were found in Jane Rimmer’s hair. Once Bradley Edwards was arrested in 2016, detectives had the confirmation Telstra was involved - previously we’d heard WA police investigated Telstra in 1997 - and in 2018, they got hold of pants worn by Telstra workers in the mid-late 90s, and the same intricate, detailed tests were compared to the fibres found on Jane, Ciara and importantly the link to the living victim - the Karrakatta rape victim. The West Australian has released a two-part video series, as Tim Clarke takes you through the areas which are key to the trial, from Claremont, where the women went missing, to Hollywood hospital and to the sites were Jane Rimmer and Ciara Glennon’s bodies were found. To watch those videos, head to: Part 1: https://thewest.com.au/news/claremont-serial-killings/claremont-serial-killings-trial-tim-clarke-takes-you-on-a-visual-tour-of-claremont-ng-b881516606z Part 2: https://thewest.com.au/news/claremont-serial-killings/claremont-serial-killings-trial-tim-clarke-takes-you-to-wellard-and-eglington-ng-b881517153z If you have any questions for the Claremont in Conversation podcast team, send them in to claremontpodcast@wanews.com.au


 Senior Sergeant George Paton transported Ms Rimmer's hair samples for analysis in 2009. (ABC News: Charlotte Hamlyn)

 Ciara Glennon's father, Denis Glennon, and Sarah Spiers's father, Don Spiers, continue to fight for justice for their daughters. (ABC News: Hugh Sando)

CLAREMONT Serial Killer Trial Podcast
The Car Seizure that Changed the Investigation  2020-03-31

https://www.podbean.com/media/share/dir-gry4n-875e360?utm_campaign=w_share_ep&utm_medium=dlink&utm_source=w_share  

The police officer who seized the car Bradley Edwards drove in the 90s told the court of the breakthrough police had when they realised the car still existed. That car was the Holden Commodore seized in December 2016 - the same day Bradley Edwards was arrested. It’s been revealed it was the car Bradley Edwards drove in 1996 and 1997 - and the prosecution say it was the car he drove to abduct Sarah Spiers, Jane Rimmer and Ciara Glennon. It’s become vitally important in the case, because the prosecution says fibres found on the victims match the fibres of the seat inserts of the car. Other fibres which the prosecution say link the victims to Bradley Edwards are blue fibres. As Tim Clarke explains in this episode, a lot of people present at the crime scenes, post mortems and fibre collection also wore blue - police officers. But the prosecution says that blue was specially made for Telstra by workfare company Yakka, the colour called Telstra Blue, and ChemCentre can prove that because their technology is so sensitive, it can pick up colour down to the wavelength, and can determine the exact colour, not tainted by the interpretation of what the human eye sees. Join Natalie Bonjolo, Tim Clarke and Alison Fan as they discuss day 65 of the Claremont Serial Killings trial. If you have any questions for the podcast team, or any of their guests, send them in to
claremontpodcast@wanews.com.au 

The Claremont Serial Killer  Trial Podcast 
The Good Old Fashion Police Work that Changed WA History 
 2020-04-06

https://www.podbean.com/media/share/dir-arkhh-88465b0?utm_campaign=w_share_ep&utm_medium=dlink&utm_source=w_share 
 
The police officer who went digging for the fingerprints that would blow the Claremont Serial Killings investigation wide open give his evidence today. Sgt Colin Stuart Beck took the stand to tell his massive involvement in one of WA’s most infamous cold cases, how his good old fashioned police work finding fingerprints from a series of break-ins, which led to fingerprints linking the Claremont cases to Huntingdale cases, and the database match with threw up the name Bradley Robert Edwards. All of these links, however didn’t have any DNA evidence. That’s when WA police set up an undercover operation to follow Bradley Edwards. Long-time listeners of the podcast and the case will remember in late December 2016, Bradley Edwards went to the movies. He had no idea police were watching his every move. He dropped a Sprite bottle into the bin as he left, police picked that bottle up and it was immediately sent to the lab. Police waited anxiously for the results, which eventually showed an exact match to Huntingdale and Karrakatta, and a match that couldn’t be ignored for Ciara. The podcast team take you through the details of Sgt Beck’s evidence - from the phone call of a DNA match, to the arrest of Bradley Edwards and the searches of four houses linked to him, through to finding clothes from the 90s to compare to fibres found in Jane and Ciara’s hair, and the car Bradley Edwards drove in 1996 and 1997. As always, Bradley Edwards is innocent until proven guilty, and this evidence is the prosecution’s way of trying to prove whether he is the Claremont Serial Killer. Join Natalie Bonjolo, Tim Clarke and forensic expert Brendan Chapman as they discuss day 68. If you have a question for the podcast team or any of their guests, send them in to 
Claremontpodcast@wanews.com.au  

Chief medical officer Brendan Murphy (pictured) said the Australian government is preparing for the coronavirus spread to become a pandemic  

Sarah Spier, Ciara Glennon and Jane Rimmer- The Claremont victims


Empty shelves are pictured in a supermarket near Milan in Italy's coronavirus-hit Lombardy region. Survival instructor Bob Cooper warned against panic buying but said Australians should start buying certain dried foods  

Two members of House test positive for COVID-19 Reps. Mario Diaz-Balart, R-Fla., and Ben McAdams, D-Utah, are the first two members of Congress who have said they tested positive for COVID-19.
March 19, 2020, 2:06 AM GMT / Updated March 19, 2020, 12:29 PM GMT
By Phil Helsel

https://www.nbcnews.com/politics/politics-news/two-members-house-test-positive-covid-19-n1163511 


 Two members of the House of Representatives have tested positive for the coronavirus illness COVID-19 and are self-quarantining, the lawmakers said Wednesday.


Reps. Mario Diaz-Balart, R-Fla., and Ben McAdams, D-Utah, are the first two members of Congress who have said they tested positive for COVID-19.
Diaz-Balart was the first to make the announcement Wednesday. His office said in a statement that after votes on Friday, he self-quarantined in Washington, D.C., and decided not to return home because his wife has a pre-existing condition.
Saturday evening, Diaz-Balart "developed symptoms, including a fever and a headache," and on Wednesday, he learned he had tested positive for COVID-19, his office said.
"I want everyone to know that I am feeling much better," Diaz-Balart said in a statement. "However, it is important that everyone take this extremely seriously and follow CDC guidelines in order to avoid getting sick and mitigate the spread of this virus."
McAdams is quarantining at home in Utah. He said that after he returned home from Washington on Saturday evening, he developed mild cold-like symptoms and isolated himself at home.
"My symptoms got worse and I developed a fever, a dry cough and labored breathing," McAdams said in a statement. He was tested Tuesday and learned Wednesday that he was positive.

"I'm doing my part as all Americans are doing to contain the spread of the virus and mitigate the coronavirus outbreak," McAdams said. "I urge Utahns to take this seriously and follow the health recommendations we're getting from the CDC and other health experts so that we can recover from this public health threat."
Neither representative's statement shed light on where they may have been exposed. 
President Donald Trump was tested, and the test came back as negative, his doctor said Saturday. 
 At least seven lawmakers said they will self-quarantine as a precaution following the news of two representatives testing positive for the virus, although they said they are not experiencing any symptoms.
Rep. Steve Scalise, R-La., said in a statement Wednesday night that because he had an extended meeting with Diaz-Balart last week, he would self-quarantine. And on Thursday, Rep. Kendra Horn, D-Okla., tweeted that she will go into a "precautionary two-week self-quarantine" after having contact with McAdams last week.
Rep. Drew Ferguson, R-Ga., also said that he will self-quarantine until March 27, after he was informed by the Attending Physician of the United States Congress that on March 13 he came into contact with a member who tested positive.
Drew Ferguson
✔@RepDrewFerguson
 · Mar 19, 2020
Today, the Attending Physician of the United States Congress informed me that I was in contact with a member of Congress on March 13th that has since tested positive for COVID-19. After heeding the advice of the President, Governor Kemp and at the direction of the House
Drew Ferguson
✔@RepDrewFerguson
physician, I will self-quarantine until March 27th. I am asymptomatic and will continue to work from my home in West Point, Ga.
12:50 AM - Mar 19, 2020

Rep. Ann Wagner, R-Mo., said in a statement Wednesday night that she would self-quarantine because she participated in a small group meeting with a colleague who has since tested positive.
Other House members who said Wednesday that they interacted with a person who tested positive and will self-quarantine include Reps. Kathleen Rice, D-N.Y., Matt Cartwright, D-Pa. and Stephanie Murphy, D-Fla. The lawmakers said that they are not experiencing symptoms but will stay at home for the next two weeks, which means they won't be able to return to Washington when the House comes back into session next week.
The office of the attending physician said in an update that it has been carefully monitoring the situation, and it has taken action to "identify any individuals who require additional monitoring for periods of quarantine."
It has also reviewed possible exposure to staff members and has identified offices and locations deemed to be at risk and cleaned those areas.
"It reflects the pace of the COVID-19 disease throughout the United States and its presence here in Washington, D.C. that it has touched the community of the U.S. Capitol," the office of the attending physician said.
More than 8,000 cases of COVID-19 had been reported in the United States as of Wednesday night, according to an NBC News count of reports around the country. The number includes confirmed and presumptive cases, people who have died, people who have recovered and those who had been repatriated from other countries.
At least 140 deaths in the U.S. have been linked to the illness, according to NBC News' count.
Worldwide, there are more than 215,000 cases and more than 8,700 deaths related to the illness, according to Johns Hopkins University, which is tracking cases

Grocery workers 'vulnerable' as panicked shoppers crowd stores
[NBC News]

BY DAVID K. LI AND SARAH KAUFMAN
Mar 21st 2020  NBC News 
https://www.aol.com/article/news/2020/03/21/grocery-workers-vulnerable-as-panicked-shoppers-crowd-stores/23957316/  

They can't work from home.
They spend hours a day within a few feet of a never-ending line of strangers, despite public health guidelines on social distancing.
And rather than their work slowing down, it has speeded up.
America's grocery store workers are on the front lines of the coronavirus pandemic, helping to keep the nation's 330 million residents alive and fed in an uncertain and frightening time.
The suddenly crucial role of grocery store employees prompted the states of Minnesota and Vermont to reclassify them as essential emergency workers, affording them benefits often similar to health care providers and first responders.
As panicked shoppers snap up toilet paper and dash for express lanes, overburdened grocery employees are clocking in at all hours to keep up with pandemic-driven demand.

Recent days have been "unlike anything I’ve ever seen at work, as "stockers were getting pushed out of the way for toilet paper" and customers were "fighting over beans," Journey Carnahan, who works at H-E-B Grocery in central Texas, told NBC News.
Despite such hand-to-hand combat in the aisles, Carnahan praised his bosses for protecting employees by limiting store hours and meticulously cleaning every surface possible.
"We have multiple bottles of cleaning spray to wipe down our check stands. The company installed sneeze guards on the check stands, as well as handing out bottles of hand sanitizer," he said.
"I personally wash my hands every chance I get, as well as putting on hand sanitizer so much my hands are dry and cracking by the end of my shift," Carnahan said.
The tension felt by consumers in the checkout line is rubbing off on some employees.
"You can feel how stressed out everyone else is," Chloe Gordon, 22, an employee of Target in, McKinney, Texas, told NBC News. "I just feel stressed out for others."

Grocery store workers, unlike health care providers, are not on the whole being given masks or other protective gear to wear on the job.
But some localities are passing rules to protect both store employees and their customers.
The Los Angeles City Council this week enacted measures that mandate markets, as well as drug stores and food-delivery businesses, to provide "all necessary sanitary cleaners," give workers time to frequently wash their hands, and provide any necessary protective wear.
“These are workers that are on the front lines of this public health emergency, and we have to make sure they have the protections they need throughout their shifts,” City Councilman Curren Price said.
“The goal of the package is for the safety and protection of the employees and customers."


Some grocery store workers said they understand the risks.
A cashier at Publix in central Florida said his company is doing all it can to keep the store clean, but that he is still bringing in his own sanitizer. He is rubbing his hands on it after every single transaction "as a precaution for myself and my family."

Sarah Spier, Ciara Glennon and Jane Rimmer- The Claremont victims

Sarah Spier, Ciara Glennon and Jane Rimmer- The Claremont victims

Who were the Claremont victims?
Sarah Spier, Ciara Glennon and Jane Rimmer.


https://www.abc.net.au/news/2019-11-24/who-were-claremont-serial-killer-victims-spiers-glennon-rimmer/11220316


Three women whose names were etched into Perth's consciousness more than 20 years ago.

​The heartbreak of the parents is shockingly apparent as they plead for information about their missing children.

​Their pain is marked on their exhausted faces as they ask, trembling, for public help to find the daughters whose names have become indelibly etched in the minds of the people of Perth over the past two decades.

Sarah Spiers. Ciara Glennon. and Jane Rimmer.

We think we know them, but we don't and we never will.
More than 20 years later, it is confronting to watch footage of their still-hopeful parents speaking at police media conferences, armed with the terrible knowledge that their beloved daughters are never coming home.
Denis Glennon, whose 27-year-old daughter Ciara went missing in March 1997, wipes his tears with a neatly folded hanky as he pleads for public help three days after she was last seen.

The white-haired man is ashen-faced as he faces the media at police headquarters, addressing them in his gentle Irish lilt.
"We are a strong family and I don't cry easily but … Ciara's alive, we believe that, and we are confident that the way she's been brought up she will fight on, and we are hopeful that she will be found at this stage," he says.
"We need your help and your prayers."

In the intervening years since the young women disappeared — Sarah in January 1996, Jane in June of the same year and Ciara in March 1997 — the focus of police and the media alike has been on catching the killer.
Every apparent new lead, new focus, new investigative technique, new suspect has been endlessly analysed and scrutinised by a public eager to see the culprit apprehended and punished.
In some ways the focus on the search for the perpetrator has subsumed the identities of the victims themselves, though their names remain as familiar as ever.
So who were Sarah Spiers, Ciara Glennon, and Jane Rimmer?

Part of the reason their disappearances resonated with the public so deeply is their relatability, the fact that they were young women who should have had their whole lives ahead of them.
Sarah, Jane and Ciara were like so many people of their age at a time when Perth was still emerging from its image as a sleepy and isolated backwater.
Each came from respectable, loving, middle-class families, had full-time jobs and had moved out of home. Young and fun loving, they had close friendship circles and bright futures.

Part of the reason their disappearances resonated with the public so deeply is their relatability, the fact that they were young women who should have had their whole lives ahead of them.
Sarah, Jane and Ciara were like so many people of their age at a time when Perth was still emerging from its image as a sleepy and isolated backwater.
Each came from respectable, loving, middle-class families, had full-time jobs and had moved out of home. Young and fun loving, they had close friendship circles and bright futures.
​​

Sarah Spier, Ciara Glennon and Jane Rimmer- The Claremont victims

Bonus Episode: “Nothing Will Stop This Trial From Going Ahead”  2020-03-18 - 
CLAREMONT Serial Killer The Trial  


 2020-03-18
https://www.podbean.com/media/share/dir-2tyhh-856ea25?utm_campaign=w_share_ep&utm_medium=dlink&utm_source=w_share 

Despite restaurants and pubs closing, and events being cancelled, WA’s trial of the century will still be going ahead.
In a last-minute, urgent hearing called at 3pm today, Justice Stephen Hall announced the news not many people, including the Claremont in Conversation team were expecting to hear.
Court will resume on Monday, March 23.
As Alison Fan explains in this special update episode, Justice Stephen Hall virtually told the court that nothing will stop this trial from going ahead, even if it’s the only criminal trial running in the building.
What followed that extraordinary news was extraordinary, unprecedented measures implemented by the court to allow it to run.
As the podcast team discusses, it’s so fortunate that this mammoth trial is judge alone, because if there was a jury, it would be likely that it would have been stopped, to start all over again in the future.

Join Natalie Bonjolo, Tim Clarke and Alison as they give you an update on the Claremont Serial Killings Trial.

The virus has infected 80,000 - including 690 passengers on board the Diamond Princess cruise ship in Japan. Pictured are passengers disembarking the ship on February 21 after a two-week quarantine ended  

The Moment the Forensics linked Ciara and Jane’s Murders  2020-04-15
-The Claremont Serial Killer Trial   

https://www.podbean.com/media/share/dir-grxv2-89a05f5?utm_campaign=w_share_ep&utm_medium=dlink&utm_source=w_share 

 Although the MACRO taskforce had investigated Jane, Ciara and Sarah’s disappearances together since the moment Jane went missing, but before 2012, there was no physical evidence linking the murders. On Day 72 of the Claremont Serial Killings trial, a ChemCentre scientist recounted the moment the first alleged forensic links were made, connecting Jane Rimmer and Ciara Glennon’s murders. In 2012, blue polyester fibres found in Jane’s hair and on Ciara’s shirt were compared to each other, and matched. For the first time, a forensic, physical, tangible link was made to link the murders of Jane and Ciara. But they didn’t know where it came from. It wasn’t until after Bradley Edwards’ arrest in 2016 that they tested Telstra pants - and they were found to match the colour and fibre make-up of the fibres found on Jane and Ciara. Mr Powell also detailed how blue fibres found on the shorts the Karrakatta rape victim was wearing, also matched fibres of Telstra shorts from the 1990s, which police had sourced from former Telstra workers, as well as fibres found on Ciara Glennon. As we know, Bradley Edwards has pleaded guilty to the rape at Karrakatta, but he denies the murders of Sarah Spiers, Jane Rimmer and Ciara Glennon. During his second day on the stand, forensic scientist Rees Powell took the court through the individual critical fibres to the trial, what other fibres they match and why they’re important. We got through 5 fibres today, so strap yourselves in for a long haul. But as Tim Clarke and Damien Cripps explain, this evidence is so important to linking Jane Rimmer physically and forensically into the trial. Join Natalie Bonjolo, Tim Clarke and Damien Cripps, as they discuss the evidence from day 72. ***We couldn’t be in the studio today and are all on the phone, please bear with the audio quality*** Justice Hall has released some exhibits from the fibre evidence to the public, you can find those photos on thewest.com.au The West Australian has also released a two-part video series, as Tim Clarke takes you through the areas which are key to the trial, from Claremont, where the women went missing, to Hollywood hospital and to the sites were Jane Rimmer and Ciara Glennon’s bodies were found. To watch those videos, head to: Part 1: https://thewest.com.au/news/claremont-serial-killings/claremont-serial-killings-trial-tim-clarke-takes-you-on-a-visual-tour-of-claremont-ng-b881516606z Part 2: https://thewest.com.au/news/claremont-serial-killings/claremont-serial-killings-trial-tim-clarke-takes-you-to-wellard-and-egli

Federico and Paola Capasso.

CLAREMONT Serial Killer The Trial   
Bonus Episode: Your DNA Questions Answered  

2020-03-19

https://www.podbean.com/media/share/dir-82i7d-8595df6?utm_campaign=w_share_ep&utm_medium=dlink&utm_source=w_share 

Now the DNA portion of the trial is over, and before we delve into the world of fibre evidence, the Claremont in Conversation team have consolidated all of the DNA evidence which is crucial to the case.
Ciara Glennon’s fingernails, the Karrakatta rape victim’s swabs and a kimono - the three pieces of evidence which the prosecution say led them to Bradley Edwards.
Joined by forensic expert Brendan Chapman, Natalie Bonjolo and Tim Clarke answer the questions you’ve asked about all things DNA in relation to the Claremont Serial Killings trial.
If you’re just jumping in, hear about the advanced DNA technique at the time which found microscopic fragments of DNA from a broken fingernail, the international agencies involved in the testing, and the fluke cold case reinvestigation which blew the Claremont case wide open.
And if you’ve been following the case from the beginning, recap the last six weeks of DNA evidence before the trial of the century resumes on March 23.
If you have any questions for the Claremont in Conversation team or any of their guests, send them in to claremontpodcast@wanews.com.au

Bradley Robert Edwards is on Trial being accused to murdering Sarah Spiers, Ciara Glennon and Jane Rimmer

NAVIRUS Americans stuck in Peru over coronavirus fears urge U.S. to bring them home 
Many of the two dozen people on a tour were able to book flights back to the U.S., but then they were canceled.
 March 19, 2020, 10:20 PM GMT
By Daniella Silva

https://www.nbcnews.com/news/world/americans-stuck-peru-over-coronavirus-fears-urge-u-s-bring-n1164316?icid=recommended 

When Federico Capasso, 70, and his wife Paola, 68, booked a 10-day trip to Peru it was supposed to be the trip of a lifetime. But in the middle of their getaway, the country declared a state of emergency — closing its borders in the midst of the coronavirus pandemic.
Now Capasso and other Americans stuck in the South American country are urging the U.S. government to help bring them home.
“We’re urging the State Department to take care of this situation,” Federico Capasso, a professor at Harvard University, said from a hotel in downtown Lima on Thursday. “We just want to make sure there is a plan in place.”
Capasso said after landing in Peru on March 9 and spending several days seeing sights such as the Sacred Valley and the Inca ruins of Machu Picchu, things took a turn for the worse.
Late Sunday, the Peruvian government issued a state of emergency, closing all international borders after midnight the next day and issuing a 15-day mandatory quarantine with limited exceptions for necessities or emergencies. The U.S. Embassy in Peru said that as of Wednesday morning, the country had 145 confirmed cases of COVID-19.
Capasso said the tour company, Odyssey Unlimited, worked diligently to secure the group of two dozen people new flights back to the U.S. as soon as possible, but those flights started getting canceled.
A State Department spokesperson said it “has no higher priority than the safety and security of U.S. citizens overseas.”
“We are aware the governments of several countries have announced suspension of air travel,” the department said. “We are considering all options to assist U.S. citizens in these countries and are continuously assessing travel conditions in all areas affected by COVID-19.”
“We will continue to update our travel advisories and safety information for U.S. travelers as situations evolve,” the department said.
An official with the State Department said U.S. citizens in Peru should monitor the embassy’s website, enroll to receive updates from the embassy, follow the advice of the CDC and local health authorities and monitor the department’s COVID-19 website. The department has not said how many Americans are in Peru who want to leave.
On Thursday afternoon, the State Department raised its global travel advisory to level 4, advising U.S. citizens to avoid all international travel because of the pandemic.
“U.S. citizens who live in the United States should arrange for immediate return to the United States, unless they are prepared to remain abroad for an indefinite period,” the department said.
President Donald Trump said earlier Thursday the government was “working on taking care” of the situation of the Americans stuck in Peru and were “trying to get them out.”
Capasso said the travel company flew the group back from the city of Cusco to Lima on March 16 and then the Capassos were supposed to board a flight from Lima back to the United States at 12:35 a.m. on March 17.
They went to the airport in Cusco and had “a boarding pass up to Boston with our luggage ready” when they heard their flight had been canceled.
Francisco Arriz, the tour director for Peru for Odyssey Unlimited, is staying at the hotel with the group and said that while everyone was trying to stay positive, some were “getting desperate.”
“Things just happened that fast and everybody lost their flights,” he said.
Arriz said his concerns were that most of those on the tour were over the age of 65 and really wanted to fly back home, see their families and take care of their health.
The U.S. Embassy in Peru said on its website that with the state of emergency, Americans who were still in the country should arrange lodging for the quarantine period and limit their movements.
On Wednesday, the country also issued a mandatory 8 p.m. to 5 a.m. curfew.
Laura Lowther, another American who was stuck in Peru, told MSNBC people who were in a remote village after announcement were unable to secure flights on time before they started being canceled.
She said after the announcement she saw "hordes of people leaving the resort" she was at and to "scramble to get a flight."
She said she checked with the embassy and was also unable to go home.
"We just don't have any indication of how or when we will be able to leave," she said.