Richard Nixon
While his reputation may have waned since, back in the ’50s Richard Nixon was considered a catch. Nixon would become president in 1969, but for much of the 1950s, he served under Dwight Eisenhower. And it appears that both men had quite a female following at the time

Perry Como
According to the Life survey respondents, the man who most resembled the ideal husband of the 1950s was Perry Como. However, the entertainer was seemingly far from perfect. An extract from the article read, “Como was chosen in spite of the fact that he does not fit all of the requirements nor all of the personal characteristics girls rate high. He is five feet nine-and-a-half inches tall instead of six feet. His eyes are brown instead of blue and he is not 23. He almost never washes dishes.”

William Holden
The 1950s are widely considered to be the Golden Age of Hollywood. So it’s little wonder that women took inspiration from the movies when it came to picturing their perfect man. One popular crush of the era was William Holden. Filmmaker Billy Wilder once said of the actor, “He was a genuine star. Every woman was in love with him.

 JFK
While he wouldn’t become president until 1961, during the 1950s John F. Kennedy made a name for himself as a handsome young senator. And while he was careful to show himself as a devoted family man, he also had a reputation as a womanizer. Nevertheless, ladies loved him, probably on account of his dashing good looks and undeniable charisma.

Day 4, Part 5: Devin Nunes and Steve Castor question Gordon Sondland
CBS News
California Congressman Devin Nunes, the top Republican on the House Intelligence Committee, and Steve Castor, senior investigative counsel for Republicans on the panel, questioned U.S. Ambassador to the E.U. Gordon Sondland on Wednesday, the fourth day of public impeachment hearings.  

Jordan to Rosenstein: Why are you keeping info from us?
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Republican accuses the deputy attorney general of 'hiding' documents related to the Russia investigation during a House hearing on the oversight of the FBI and DOJ during the 2016 election.

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Not jealous
Having a touch of the green-eyed monster wasn’t something that women of the time wanted from their potential husbands. Jealousy was considered an unattractive attribute by the women polled for the Life magazine article. Clearly, they wanted a man who was sure enough in himself not to have feelings of envy.

Cheerful
Another asset on women’s checklists was someone with a cheerful disposition. A moody man simply wouldn’t do for many of the ladies quizzed by Life. So while the saying goes “happy wife, happy life,” it seems that a merry husband is just as essential to household harmony.

How does Donald (Trump) compare to Ronald (Reagan)? - BBC Newsnight
 BBC Newsnight
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It's 36 years since the inauguration of Ronald Reagan, the former Hollywood actor. Documentary maker Michael Cockerell filmed with Reagan at the time and looks at the similarities - and differences - between Ronald Reagan and Donald Trump.Subscribe to our channel here: https://goo.gl/31Q53FNewsnight is the BBC's flagship news and current affairs TV programme - with analysis, debate, exclusives, and robust interviews. Website: www.bbc.co.uk/newsnightYouTube: https://www.youtube.com/user/BBCNewsn... Twitter: https://twitter.com/BBCNewsnightFacebook: https://www.facebook.com/bbcnewsnight


Elvis
By the late 1950s Elvis Presley had risen out of poverty to become one of the world’s biggest superstars. What’s more, his iconic good looks made him one of the era’s most enduring sex symbols. With that in mind, it’s little wonder that many women dreamed of becoming Presley’s wife.

You May Be Surprised By What 1950s Women Saw As Perfect Husband Material
Affluent Times - By Staff Writer- September 27, 2019

https://affluenttimes.com/lifestyle/nostalgia-lifestyle/may-be-surprised-what-fifties-women-saw-perfect-husband-material/2/?l=a&utm_source=AOL.com&utm_medium=Referral&utm_campaign=Direct
It’s safe to say that gender roles have moved on quite a bit since the 1950s. Back then, women largely stayed home and kept house while men went out and earned a living. However, expectations were beginning to change during the decade itself, and some of the qualities girls desired in a husband may come as a big surprise.

Dubious friends of Donald Trump: the Russians
 ZEMBLA - Onderzoeksjournalistiek
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Although still in its early days, Donald Trump’s presidency is coming under fire. The Russians are alleged to be in possession of sensitive information about Trump. And that exposes Trump to blackmail. Fake news, tweets Trump: “I have nothing to do with Russia – no deals, no loans, no nothing!” Trump swears he has no ties with the Russians. But is that actually the case?For months, the FBI have been investigating Russian interference in the American presidential elections. ZEMBLA is investigating another explosive dossier concerning Trump’s involvement with the Russians: Trump’s business and personal ties to oligarchs from the former Soviet Union. Powerful billionaires suspected of money laundering and fraud, and of having contacts in Moscow and with the mafia. What do these relationships say about Trump and why does he deny them? How compromising are these dubious business relationships for the 45th president of the United States? And are there connections with the Netherlands? ZEMBLA meets with one of Trump’s controversial cronies and speaks with a former CIA agent, fraud investigators, attorneys, and an American senator among others.Subscribe to the channel of Zembla: http://bit.ly/ZEMBLA_BNNVARAInstagram: http://bit.ly/ZEMBLA_InstagramTwitter: http://bit.ly/ZEMBLA_twitter


How much trouble is Jeffrey Epstein's death for the Royal Family? - BBC Newsnight
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•Aug 19, 2019
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Prince Andrew is appalled by sex abuse claims about his ex-friend Jeffrey Epstein, Buckingham Palace has said.Subscribe to our channel here: https://goo.gl/31Q53FIt comes after the Mail on Sunday published footage that claimed to show the Duke of York inside the financier's Manhattan mansion in 2010 - two years after Epstein's first conviction.A Buckingham Palace statement said: "The Duke of York has been appalled by the recent reports of Jeffrey Epstein's alleged crimes. His Royal Highness deplores the exploitation of any human being and the suggestion he would condone, participate in or encourage any such behaviour is abhorrent."But what was the Duke of York doing at Epstein's house?Jeffrey Epstein, 66, took his own life in a jail cell while awaiting trial on sex trafficking charges in New York.Kirsty Wark speaks to former BBC Royal Correspondent, Michael Cole.Newsnight is the BBC's flagship news and current affairs TV programme - with analysis, debate, exclusives, and robust interviews. Website: https://www.bbc.co.uk/newsnightTwitter: https://twitter.com/BBCNewsnightFacebook: https://www.facebook.com/bbcnewsnight


Affluent Times
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This Girl Was Locked In Her Body For Years, But What She’s Done Since Is Beyond Astonishing
By Staff Writer
September 27, 2019

https://affluenttimes.com/lifestyle/feel-good-news/girl-locked-in-body-years-done-since-astonishing/?l=a&utm_source=AOL.com&utm_medium=Referral&utm_campaign=Direct


A teenage girl lies immobile in a hospital room. For some time she has been unconscious – and now she doesn’t seem able to move. Doctors write her off, advising her family to accept that she will not recover. In fact, she will probably die. But although no one thinks Victoria Arlen can hear their predictions, she can, and she’s determined to overcome being locked in.

Not secretive
In keeping with their desire for an honest man, women of the 1950s didn’t want their husbands to be secretive. They much preferred full disclosure in their marriage, with their man laying it all out on the table. So while she was often left at home, she clearly expected her husband to fill her in with all the significant happenings of his day..

Well-educated
The ideal husband should have a good education, according to the women who took part in the Life poll. Being learned was a highly-prized asset, so much so that some females enrolled in college simply to find the perfect man. As a result, some girls jokingly claimed they were “seeking an M.R.S. degree.”

Community-orientated
One of the more unusual attributes outlined in the Life article required men to be involved in civic matters. It was unclear what this meant exactly, but it perhaps suggested that women liked their men to take an interest in politics or helping out in the community. In general, then, it seems that husbands should have been model citizens.

Sondland says Giuliani pushed for Ukraine quid pro quo AP
LISA MASCARO, MARY CLARE JALONICK AND ERIC TUCKER- Nov 20th 2019
https://www.aol.com/article/news/2019/11/20/sondland-says-giuliani-pushed-for-ukraine-quid-pro-quo/23865101/
WASHINGTON (AP) — Ambassador Gordon Sondland told House impeachment investigators Wednesday that Rudy Giuliani had pushed a “quid pro quo” with Ukraine that he had to go along with because it’s what President Donald Trump wanted.
“Mr. Giuliani was expressing the desires of the president of the United States, and we knew that these investigations were important to the president,” Sondland said of his dealings with Trump’s personal attorney.
Sondland, the most highly anticipated witness in the public impeachment probe, made clear that he believed Trump was pursuing his desire for investigations in return for the Oval Office meeting that the Eastern European nation’s president sought. Sondland said he later came to believe military aid for Ukraine was also being held up until the investigations were launched.
“I know that members of this committee have frequently framed these complicated issues in the form of a simple question: Was there a ‘quid pro quo?’ As I testified previously, with regard to the requested White House call and White House meeting, the answer is yes,” he said.
The impeachment inquiry focuses significantly on allegations that Trump sought investigations of Democrat Joe Biden and his son — and the discredited idea that Ukraine rather than Russia interfered in the 2016 U.S. election — in return for the badly needed military aid as well as the White House visit.
Sondland, a wealthy hotelier and Trump donor, has emerged as a central figure in an intense week in the impeachment prone that has featured nine witnesses testifying over three days. Both Democrats and Republicans were uncertain about what Sondland would testify to, given that he had already clarified parts of his initial private deposition before lawmakers.
His opening statement included several key details. He confirmed that he spoke with Trump on a cellphone from a busy Kyiv restaurant the day after the president prodded Ukraine’s leader to investigate political rival Joe Biden. He also said he kept Secretary of State Mike Pompeo and other top administration officials aware of his dealings with Ukraine on the investigations Trump sought.
Sondland said he specifically told Vice President Mike Pence he “had concerns” that U.S. military aid to Ukraine “had become tied” to the investigations.
“Everyone was in the loop,” Sondland testified in opening remarks. “It was no secret.”
Sondland appeared prepared to fend off scrutiny over the way his testimony has shifted in closed-door settings, saying “my memory has not been perfect.” He said the State Department left him without access to emails, call records and other documents he needed in the inquiry.
Still, he did produce new emails and text messages to bolster his assertion that others in the administration were aware of the investigations he was pursuing for Trump from Ukraine.
Sondland insisted, twice, that he was “adamantly opposed to any suspension of aid” for Ukraine. “I was acting in good faith. As a presidential appointee, I followed the directions of the president.”
The son of immigrants who he said escaped Europe during the Holocaust, Sondland described himself as a “lifelong Republican” who has worked with officials from both parties, including Biden.
Democratic Intelligence Committee Chairman Adam Schiff of California opened the hearing saying, “The knowledge of this scheme was far and wide.”
Schiff warned Pompeo and other administration officials who are refusing to turn over documents and testimony to the committee “they do so at their own peril.” He said obstruction of Congress was included in articles of impeachment during Watergate.
The top Republican on the committee, Devin Nunes of California, decried the inquiry and told the ambassador, "Mr. Sondland, you are here to be smeared."
Nunes renewed his demand to hear from the still-anonymous whistleblower whose complaint about Trump’s July 25 phone call with Ukraine President Volodymyr Zelenskiy led the House to open the impeachment inquiry.
Associated Press writer Colleen Long in Washington contributed to this report.


Honest
It will probably come as no surprise to find that women of the 1950s expected their husbands to be honest. Being truthful is still considered an important component of a successful relationship today, of course. As a result, honesty remains high on the list of attributes people look for in their future spouse.

Unresponsive in her bed, Arlen can hear the voices of her three brothers – one older, and two of her triplets. And they’re keeping her up to date with a world that she cannot take part in. Moving is impossible, but her brain continues to work. Unbelievably, it’s the only thing about her that does function. But her brothers don’t know that – and neither do the medics.

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The Trump Impeacment Breifing, November 23, 2019

The New York Times , 
By Noah Weiland


Welcome to the Impeachment Briefing. Today we’re looking at how Republicans have been deploying counternarratives to impeachment.

What happened today
· Russia has been mounting a disinformation campaign for years to frame Ukraine for its 2016 election meddling, American intelligence officials told senators. Those unfounded claims about Ukrainian interference have seeped into Republican impeachment talking points.
· In a 53-minute phone interview with “Fox & Friends” this morning, Mr. Trump attacked the impeachment inquiry and accused David Holmes, who testified yesterday, of fabricating a phone call between Mr. Trump and Gordon Sondland, the American ambassador to the European Union. (There is no evidence of this; Mr. Sondland confirmed Mr. Holmes’s account of the call.)
· Tonight’s installment of “The Latest,” The Times’s new impeachment podcast, explores what the Fox interview tells us about Mr. Trump’s impeachment defense.

How Republicans used impeachment hearings

What happened in this week’s impeachment hearings? Your answer might depend on which lawmakers you were watching.

That’s because there are, as BuzzFeed put it, “two separate impeachment hearings happening right now.” One is run by Democrats, who are trying to build the case that the president’s behavior is impeachable, and one is run by Republicans, who are devising an entirely different narrative: that the evidence is thin, the witnesses aren’t trustworthy, and the investigation is focused on the wrong people.

I asked my colleague Jeremy Peters, who covers conservative politicians and news media, to help me understand how Republicans have refined that strategy in the past few weeks.

1. Rapid, prosecution-style questioning that can be amplified out of context
Some members of the House Intelligence Committee have used their five-minute question blocks to make rapid-fire assertions to befuddled witnesses, creating short video clips that are then replayed on Twitter and by conservative news outlets. See, for example, this video of Representative Jim Jordan questioning Bill Taylor, the top American diplomat in Ukraine.


Continue reading the main story
And yesterday, Representative Devin Nunes, the top Republican on the committee, rattled off a group of obscure names he believed were tied to a Ukrainian election meddling scheme, asking Fiona Hill and Mr. Holmes about them.

Jeremy: “What they’ve been trying to do is muddy the waters as much as possible. The facts are really dense: the corporations, the people, the names. They know that it’s a case with a lot of figures whose names we don’t really recognize, whose jobs we don’t fully understand, who saw things that we’re not entirely sure add up to impeachable activity."

 

2. What the Bidens and Obama did was worse
Republicans have given the impression of conducting a parallel inquiry about what they view as shady dealings related to Hunter Biden, Joe Biden’s son. “If the Democrats and the media are suddenly so deeply concerned about bribery,” Mr. Nunes said in his opening statement on Tuesday morning, “you would think they would take some interest in Burisma paying Hunter Biden $83,000 a month.
And as a way of responding to claims that Mr. Trump help up military aid, Republicans have pointed to Mr. Trump approving the sale of antitank missiles to Ukrainians, which former President Barack Obama did not
“The Trump administration changed course from its predecessor and provided lethal defensive assistance to the Ukraine,” Steve Castor, the Republican staff lawyer on the Intelligence Committee, said yesterday. Hours later, Mr. Trump posted a video of the conservative radio personality Mark Levin making the same point.
Jeremy: “The Bidens, their argument goes, were doing corrupt things themselves. It’s a classic Trump argument: ‘What about them? They did it. Why am I getting in trouble for something they did? I know you are, but what am I?’ The best example of this is what he did with the Clintons, after the release of the “Access Hollywood” tape. ‘So what if I said this horrible thing on tape and I got caught? So what if I engaged in this locker room talk? What Bill Clinton did is way worse.’”


3. Talking points that rebut the witnesses in real time
On Wednesday, Mr. Sondland testified that he saw the Ukraine campaign as a clear “quid pro quo.” He also recalled that the president once told him: “I want nothing. I want nothing. I want no quid pro quo.” Mr. Trump soon read out those lines from handwritten notes on the White House lawn. Representatives Mark Meadows and Jim Jordan, two of Mr. Trump’s favorite allies, tweeted out the lines around the same time in the hearing room. Hours later, Republicans had a poster board behind the dais in the hearing room that read, “I WANT NOTHING.”
Jeremy: “Lines are taken out, isolated, stripped of context and meant to look as if they’ve completely cleared the president. If you turned on Sean Hannity’s show the night of Mr. Sondland’s testimony, what you heard was not Mr. Sondland admitting a quid pro quo, but the idea that ‘this is over for the Democrats.’ He spun it as Democrats having their worst day yet and having been humiliated, when in fact we learned new and really damaging info about the president.”


4. Using testimony to attack the witnesses’ character

When Lt. Col. Alexander Vindman testified on Tuesday, multiple Republicans on the committee, including Mr. Nunes, asked questions that implied he had been working in conjunction with the anonymous whistle-blower whose complaint prompted the investigation. As BuzzFeed reported, an article on Gateway Pundit, a pro-Trump website, tying Colonel Vindman to the whistle-blower had been widely shared on Facebook.
This morning, Senator Marsha Blackburn leveled the same kind of accusation on Twitter:
Jeremy: “One strategy Republicans and conservative media have used is ridiculing witnesses, to make them look diminished. When George Kent, a Ukraine expert at the State Department, testified, they were making fun of him for wearing a bow tie, calling him a nerd. Yesterday on Fox News, Laura Ingraham was making fun of Fiona Hill’s British accent. Ridicule is a huge component. If you’re trying to win an argument in the court of public opinion, you have to impeach their character.”


What else we’re reading
· Speaking of smears, a former Fox News host wrote a column in our Opinion pages today outlining how and why the cable network spreads conspiracy theories, including their repeated assertion that the decorated combat veteran had dual loyalties to Ukraine.
· So much happened this week in the impeachment investigation. We put together a comprehensive guide — something you should bookmark — about relevant procedures, the cast of characters, and the latest news.
· And finally, find some time this weekend to look through Damon Winter’s gorgeous black-and-white photos from inside the hearing room.

Not controlling
While women were expected to let their husbands take the lead in family business as head of the house, they didn’t want to share their life with tyrants. Consequently, being controlling was cited as a negative attribute by the girls who took part in the Life poll. Instead, wives expected a certain level of freedom.

Trump/Russia: Moscow rules (3/3) | Four Corners
ABC ws In-depth
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It's the story of the century: The US President and his connections to Russia.In part one of this three-part series, Four Corners follows the money trail from New York to Moscow, tracking the ties between Donald Trump, his business empire and Russia.Part 2: https://youtu.be/lEQBHeZqDIoPart 3: https://youtu.be/p5BLKKREIck

Donald Trump the Perfect 1950's Husband, who was elected the president of the USA.

Donald Trump's his enemies are trying to have him impeached,. based on claims that Donald Trump as the President of the USA was pursuing his desire for investigations in return for the Oval Office meeting that the Eastern European nation’s president sought. Sondland said he later came to believe military aid for Ukraine was also being held up until the investigations into the Biden Family were launched.

Fierce fallout after Prince Andrew breaks his silence on Jeffrey Epstein l ABC News
ABC News 6.89 M subscribers
Prince Andrew answered questions about his friendship with Epstein in a new interview.

Talkative
Women wanted their husbands to be chatty as well. Being talkative was cited as a plus in the Life poll. In fact, two-thirds of the girls who took part in the survey said that they would prefer a talker to a listener, but they themselves didn’t promise to be a good listener either.

President Donald Trump the Perfect American Husband

When it came to finding the ideal husband, for women of the 1950s height was key. The perfect suitor had to be tall, with the optimum measurement seemingly being a nice, round 6 feet. Back in 1957 the average woman was 5 feet, 2 inches tall, meaning girls dreamed of having a man tower over them.

Rock Hudson
Another celebrity heartthrob of the era was Rock Hudson, and many women considered him to be perfect husband material. Handsome Hudson starred in a number of popular movies including Giant and All That Heaven Allows. But at the time his dedicated female following were unaware of the fact that he was actually gay.

Vindman: Improper for Trump to demand Biden investigation
 CNN
7.86M subscribers
A key National Security Council aide told lawmakers Tuesday that President Donald Trump's push for Ukraine to investigate former Vice President Joe Biden on a July call was "inappropriate," and he knew "without hesitation" that he had to report it.

In new Yahoo News/YouGov poll, most voters think Trump committed abuses — but are split on impeachment

Yahoo News- ANDREW ROMANO - Nov 22nd 2019 6:31PM

https://www.aol.com/article/news/2019/11/22/in-new-yahoo-newsyougov-poll-most-voters-think-trump-committed-abuses-but-are-split-on-impeachment/23866292/


As two weeks of televised impeachment hearings and wall-to-wall coverage came to a close, a new Yahoo News/YouGov poll showed that a majority of registered voters believe Donald Trump abused his powers as president of the United States. But the country remained divided over the question of whether he should be impeached as a result.

The poll was conducted Nov. 20 to Nov. 22. There were five days of televised House Intelligence Committee hearings, ending Thursday, Nov. 21.

When asked to say whether they believe Trump did or did not commit specific acts in connection with Ukraine — the subject of the House impeachment inquiry — 58 percent of registered voters said they believe the president “asked a foreign leader to investigate a political opponent”; 51 percent said they believe he “withheld military aid to Ukraine until they agreed to conduct the investigations he wanted”; and 51 percent said they believe he “abused his powers as president.” (Respondents were not asked about any other allegations against Trump.)

These results suggest that a majority of registered voters have been largely convinced by the case House Democrats are making in Washington: that Trump pressured Ukrainian President Volodymyr Zelensky to investigate former Vice President Joe Biden and his son by using nearly $400 million in military assistance as a quid pro quo — and that he overstepped the bounds of the presidency in the process. 

Yet only 48 percent of registered voters said they favor impeaching Trump or removing him from office — slightly more than the 45 percent who opposed impeaching or removing him, but less than a majority. 

The remaining 7 percent were undecided whether Trump should be impeached or removed, a sign that some registered voters may still be persuadable. And while Republicans and Democrats have largely made up their minds about removal — 83 percent of Republicans oppose it; the same percentage of Democrats are in favor — independents are less certain: A slight plurality of them (40 percent) said Trump should be removed, while another 23 percent said they’re still not sure.

Americans are even divided by party over what they believe the likely outcome of the impeachment inquiry will be. Overall, only 11 percent believed that Trump will be removed from office; a plurality (41 percent) expected impeachment in the House followed by acquittal in the GOP-controlled Senate. That’s a view shared by a majority (54 percent) of Democrats. Yet a majority of Republicans (56 percent) believe that Trump won’t be impeached at all.

These disparities may reflect the fact that Republicans are paying less attention to the impeachment inquiry than Democrats. Fifty-six percent of Democrats said they have been following the congressional hearings “very closely” or “somewhat closely”; among Republicans, that number was 11 percentage points lower. 

Regardless, Americans say impeachment will play a big role in how they vote in next November’s congressional elections. Asked to rate how important their current representative’s impeachment vote will be in their decision about casting their own vote for Congress, Democrats and Republicans were in ra
re agreement, with 74 percent in both parties saying it will be either “very important” or “somewhat important.” 

Values their opinion
While women valued men who were independent, they still wanted to have their say on important household decisions. As a result, girls wanted to marry a man who would value their opinion, or at least consult them before reaching an outcome. That way, married couples could figure things out together.

The New York Times
Impeachment Briefing, Concluding a momentous three-day stretch of public hearings.
November 22, 2019
By Noah Weiland


Welcome to the Impeachment Briefing. Two witnesses described their intimate views of an attempted quid pro quo, concluding a momentous three-day stretch of public hearings.

Who testified today?
Fiona Hill, the White House’s former top Europe and Russia expert, who had testified previously about her efforts to oppose the pressure campaign on Ukraine; and David Holmes, an official in the United States Embassy in Ukraine, who was a witness to a key phone call between President Trump and Gordon Sondland, his ambassador to the European Union.

What were the highlights?

· Dr. Hill criticized Republicans for promoting what she called a “fictional narrative” embraced by Mr. Trump: that Ukraine, not Russia, meddled in the 2016 elections. “I would ask that you please not promote politically driven falsehoods that so clearly advance Russian interest,” she said. “These fictions are harmful even if they are deployed for purely domestic political purposes.”

· Dr. Hill called Mr. Trump’s demands for Ukraine to announce investigations into Joe Biden and the 2016 elections a “domestic political errand” that diverged from American foreign policy goals. “This is all going to blow up,” she recalled telling Mr. Sondland.
· Dr. Hill was asked about a now-famous line from her deposition, in which she quoted John Bolton, the national security adviser at the time, as saying, “I am not part of whatever drug deal Sondland and Mulvaney are cooking up.” She said she took “drug deal” to mean the scheme of exchanging a White House meeting for the investigations Mr. Trump sought.
· Both Dr. Hill and Mr. Holmes said that the use of the name “Burisma” — a Ukrainian energy company — was code for investigating the Bidens. Asked whether “anyone involved in Ukraine matters in the spring and summer would understand that as well,” Mr. Holmes had a one-word answer: “Yes.”
· Mr. Holmes said he had a “clear impression” that the hold on nearly $400 million in military aid for Ukraine was “likely intended by the president either as an expression of dissatisfaction with the Ukrainians who had not yet agreed to the Burisma/Biden investigation, or as an effort to increase the pressure on them to do so.”
Here’s a quick video recap of some of the biggest moments. And if you want to go deeper, here’s our full story on the day’s events, a profile of Dr. Hill, Dr. Hill’s opening statement and Mr. Holmes’s opening statement.


Fiona Hill and the ‘Russia hoax’

T.J. Kirkpatrick for The New York Times


In her testimony today, Dr. Hill reminded investigators of the ways in which Russia continues to influence American politics. I asked my colleague Scott Shane, who has written widely on the subject, what Dr. Hill may have been hoping to do with that theme.
Scott, I thought one of the most vivid lines from Dr. Hill today was her saying Russian security services “operate like a super PAC,” spending millions to weaponize America’s own “false narratives.” What did she mean by that?


Continue reading the main story

Russia is weak economically and militarily, at least relative to the U.S. But Vladimir Putin has been creative in discovering relatively low-cost, high-payoff ways to confront the U.S. One is hacking, and one is influence and information operations. That has come back in new ways in the impeachment inquiry. Recently, Russians have enthusiastically endorsed the idea that they didn’t have anything to do with interfering in the election, but Ukrainians did.


Why did she make so much of her testimony today about the threat of Russian meddling?


She seemed to have felt that in the microscopic examination of the events this past summer related to the White House and Ukraine, the members of the committee might have lost the forest for the trees, and she wanted to restore a larger framework, that these are two countries — Russia and Ukraine — that are at war with each other, and Ukraine depends on us.

 

We’ve heard Devin Nunes, the top Republican on the Intelligence Committee, mock the idea of the “Russia hoax” over and over the past two weeks. She seemed to want to take that on.

 

People can hear the words “Russia hoax” pronounced by the president, by many commentators on Fox News, and by members of the House, some of whom were at the hearing today, and take that to mean not just the idea of “collusion,” but an assertion that the Russians didn’t interfere in our elections.

For somebody like Dr. Hill, who’s one of the top handful of experts on Russia in Washington and who co-wrote a 500-page book on Mr. Putin, it has to be just infuriating to hear that suggestion.

In the hearing today we heard more about this “server” conspiracy, about a hacked server at the Democratic National Committee that Mr. Trump believes Ukrainians actually hacked, and not Russians.

It’s an alternate theory to the entire set of facts on the Russian intelligence operation in 2016 that Robert Mueller and many others have established in detailed, indisputable terms. It’s like a Hail Mary pass that can somehow defeat his enemies in the media and intelligence agencies, disprove the story that there are questions about the legitimacy of his election and restore the luster of his presidency. It has the power of political emotion behind it.

A restaurant terrace and a presidential phone call

Between a beauty supply store and a smoke shop in Kyiv, the Ukrainian capital, is SHO, a ritzy fine-dining destination for politicians and diplomats — and, now, the setting for a crucial piece of evidence in the impeachment investigation.

It was there, seated on the terrace on July 26 — a day after Mr. Trump’s phone call with Ukraine’s president — that Mr. Sondland called the president from his cellphone, the two men speaking loudly enough that Mr. Holmes could hear both sides of the conversation. In his testimony today, he described the scene at length.
The morning began with meetings at the Presidential Administration Building a mile from the restaurant, where Mr. Holmes and other American officials met with a series of top Ukrainian officials, including President Volodymyr Zelensky. But when most of the group left, Mr. Sondland took aside Andriy Yermak, a top Zelensky aide, for a one-on-one meeting that Mr. Holmes was told he could not attend.
Mr. Sondland agreed to take Mr. Holmes to lunch, where the two sat across from each other, drinking wine and eating an appetizer. At some point after discussing Mr. Sondland’s hotel business, Mr. Sondland tried calling Mr. Trump, several times announcing himself: “Gordon Sondland holding for the president.”

Mr. Trump picked up the phone, talking so loudly that Mr. Sondland had to hold his cellphone away from his ear, letting Mr. Holmes in on the conversation. Mr. Holmes said he heard the president ask, “So he’s going to do the investigation?” to which Mr. Sondland replied that he would, adding that Mr. Zelensky “will do anything you ask him to do.”
After the call, Mr. Holmes asked whether the president cared about Ukraine, and Mr. Sondland said he did not — “the president only cares about big stuff,” he said. Mr. Holmes noted that there was “big stuff” happening in Ukraine, like a war with Russia. But Mr. Sondland explained that he meant “big stuff” that benefits the president, like the “Biden investigation” that Rudy Giuliani was pushing.
Mr. Holmes returned to the U.S. Embassy and immediately reported the call to his supervisor. “I’ve never seen anything like this,” he said today.

What else we’re reading
· At a meeting today, White House aides and Senate Republicans were divided over whether to embrace a lengthy impeachment trial. Some Republicans are pushing for a quick trial to limit the political damage. Others want a deliberate one, which could force some Democrats running for president to choose between the trial and their campaigns.

· Also today, Senator Lindsey Graham sent a letter to Secretary of State Mike Pompeo requesting documents that could signal which witnesses Republicans might call during a trial, including communications involving Mr. Biden, his son Hunter Biden, officials from the Obama administration and the former Ukrainian president Petro Poroshenko.

· The witnesses’ style choices over the past week presented some convenient battlefield symbolism fitting of the mood of the hearings, our fashion critic wrote.

· Mr. Holmes’s testimony made reference to ASAP Rocky. Wondering why the president was talking to his ambassador to the E.U. about a rapper from Harlem? Here’s an explainer The Times published back in July.

 

Jolly
Despite the pressures men had bear in providing for their families in the ’50s, girls still didn’t want their husbands to take life too seriously. Instead, they dreamed of sharing life with a jolly man. And in general, the decade offered people lots of things to smile about. For example, average incomes were on the rise and a new generation of household appliances were making life easier than ever before.

Not bossy
Men who were bossy were seemingly a big turn off for women 60 years ago. While popular TV shows of the day may have dictated that “Father Knows Best,” women didn’t like being told what to do by their husbands. With that in mind, maybe wives of the 1950s weren’t as subservient as small-screen stereotypes of the time would have us believe

Modest
Arrogance was considered a major turn-off for women in the ’50s. Instead, they wanted their future husband to have an air of modesty. And it seems that not much has changed in 60 years. Indeed, according to a Facebook post by True Love Dates, many women still find cockiness an unattractive characteristic in men today.

Dancing
The perfect date night during the 1950s almost certainly involved dancing. Women of the day loved the pastime, in fact, and they expected their husbands to be willing partners. But according to the Life poll, two-thirds of women were willing to put up with a man with no rhythm. As the article stated, “All she requires is that he try”

James Dean
James Dean was yet another celebrity whom women found themselves daydreaming about in the 1950s. During his short-lived career, Dean acquired sex symbol status thanks to his cool demeanor. But, sadly, he wouldn’t see the decade out. He died aged 24 in an automobile accident in 1955.

Wikipedia Exposed Media - WEM www.wikipediaexposed.org

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Marlon Brando
Another public figure who women felt would make the ideal husband was Marlon Brando. Thanks in part to his roles in films including Streetcar Named Desire, On the Waterfront and The Wild One, the actor had somewhat of a bad boy image. And it seems the ladies couldn’t resist his rebellious charm.

Trump/Russia: Secrets, spies and useful idiots (2/3) | Four Corners
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It's the story of the century: The US President and his connections to Russia.In part one of this three-part series, Four Corners follows the money trail from New York to Moscow, tracking the ties between Donald Trump, his business empire and Russia.Part 2: https://youtu.be/lEQBHeZqDIoPart 3: https://youtu.be/p5BLKKREIck

Not possessive
According to the 1956 Life article, “A basic occupation of virtually every woman is choosing a man to marry.” And in what was perhaps a sign of changing gender roles in the ’50s, girls didn’t want their husbands to treat them as if they were simply another possession. With that in mind, controlling men weren’t deemed to be attractive.

Handy at repairs
While the home may have been considered a woman’s domain in the 1950s, wives nonetheless wanted their husbands to be of some use around the house. In particular, a man should be good at repairing things. Being adept at making stuff was also considered a plus, with woodworking cited as the respondents’ preferred hobby for their hubbies in the Life poll.

Domesticated
In line with new ideas about the modern man, women wanted to find a husband who was willing to help out around the house. In the 1950s, however, females were expected to take the lion’s share of household chores. As a result, even a little cooperation from the man of the house would probably go a long way.

Sociable
Indeed, women of the 1950s wanted their husbands to be sociable in general. Men who were unwilling to spend time with friends and family were considered a turn-off. However, conflicting marriage advice from the decade – as quoted by the Daily Mail advised wives to “make the evening his” and never resort to “complaining if he does not take you out.”

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Date night
In many ways, dating as we know it today was invented in the 1950s. And women of the day didn’t want the evenings out to stop when they finally found their perfect men. As a result, they hoped their husbands would take them out on the town, if not dancing then at least to dinner or the movies.

White House hits back at impeachment testimonies: A public joke
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Press Secretary Stephanie Grisham reacts to the first public hearing in the Trump impeachment inquiry. #Tucker #FoxNews  

Athletic - Another highly prized attribute for women of the 1950s was athleticism. Being sporty in general was considered a big plus, and it didn’t really matter what a man’s specific preferred activity may be. However, that being said, according to a 1956 Life article basketball, baseball and football were the most popular sports girls had in mind for their future husbands.

Intelligent
Future wives of the 1950s hoped for a husband who was clever. So intelligence was seen as a definite plus in a partner. However, the same cannot be said for the men of today. According to research by the Warsaw School of Economics in Poland, males aren’t attracted to bright women, unless they happen to be beautiful as well.

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Indicted child sex trafficker Jeffrey Epstein is found dead in jail of an apparent suicide, spurring conspiracy theories and a conversation about problems with the U.S. prison system.Subscribe to The Daily Show:https://www.youtube.com/channel/UCwWh... Follow The Daily Show:Twitter: https://twitter.com/TheDailyShowFacebook: https://www.facebook.com/thedailyshowInstagram: https://www.instagram.com/thedailyshowWatch full episodes of The Daily Show for free: http://www.cc.com/shows/the-daily-sho...Follow Comedy Central:Twitter: https://twitter.com/ComedyCentralFacebook: https://www.facebook.com/ComedyCentralInstagram: https://www.instagram.com/comedycentralAbout The Daily Show:Trevor Noah and The World's Fakest News Team tackle the biggest stories in news, politics and pop culture.The Daily Show with Trevor Noah airs weeknights at 11/10c on Comedy Central.

Well-read
According to a survey carried out by dating site Elite Singles, reading is considered an attractive attribute. And that’s something women in the ’50s already knew. They desired a partner who was well-read. However, they didn’t want their men to get so lost in a book that they refused to help out.

Exploring the life and death of Jeffrey Epstein - Sky News Australia 1.5 Million plus  views 
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MSNBC2.15M subscribersSNew reporting is giving us insight into registered sex offender Jeffrey Epstein’s wealthy and powerful connections. New York Magazine deputy editor David Wallace-Wells joins Stephanie Ruhle to discuss what we know about Epstein’s elite circle.» Subscribe to MSNBC: http://on.msnbc.com/SubscribeTomsnbcMSNBC delivers breaking news, in-depth analysis of politics headlines, as well as commentary and informed perspectives. Find video clips and segments from The Rachel Maddow Show, Morning Joe, Meet the Press Daily, The Beat with Ari Melber, Deadline: White House with Nicolle Wallace, Hardball, All In, Last Word, 11th Hour, and more.Connect with MSNBC OnlineVisit msnbc.com: http://on.msnbc.com/ReadmsnbcSubscribe to MSNBC Newsletter: http://MSNBC.com/NewslettersYouTubeFind MSNBC on Facebook: http://on.msnbc.com/LikemsnbcFollow MSNBC on Twitter: http://on.msnbc.com/FollowmsnbcFollow MSNBC on Instagram: http://on.msnbc.com/Instamsnbc

Polite
With that in mind, men with good manners were also appreciated by women of the 1950s. A rude husband was a big no-no. And it seems that dating was the perfect opportunity for males to prove their good etiquette, as it was considered proper for a man to ask his crush out, collect her at her door and ultimately foot the bill.

23 years of age
In 1956 Life magazine published the findings of a survey it had asked the National Field Service to complete. In it, they asked young females about their desired qualities in a spouse. And when the results came in, it seemed that 23 was deemed the ideal age of a potential suitor.

While many women today may dream of being swept off their feet by a tall, dark and handsome stranger, ladies in the 1950s had different tastes. For them, the ideal man would have had sparkling blue eyes. And according to some studies, there may be scientific evidence to suggest that people are generally more attracted to light eyes than dark ones.

Trump/Russia: Follow the money (1/3) | Four Corners 1,091,531 views•Jun 17, 2018
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Green-fingered
While women were expected to look after matters in the home, having a man who could attend to the garden was definitely seen as a plus. Back then, one of the fashions was to fill your yard with quirky ornaments. So it may also have been beneficial for a man to have a good taste in gnomes.

Fun-loving
In the 1950s women wanted husbands who knew how to have a good time. And while plenty of difficult social issues were being tackled during the era, in general fun was easy to come by. For example, televisions were just beginning to take off and many families entertained themselves by crowding around their favorite shows.

Has a steady job
When women married 60 years ago, most of them gave up employment in order to fulfill the role of a housewife. With that in mind, many girls dreamed of bagging a husband with a reliable profession. After all, the whole family would rely on the man’s income to survive, so being able to provide for them was considered very important.

Although it was a tough time for Arlen’s parents, they persevered. As her mother Jacqueline told Modern Hero, “There were times I was just in the fetal position going ‘this too shall pass’ because it went on for so long.” Eventually, Arlen’s parents took her home to New Hampshire so they could care for her in a converted hospital-room.

The Conspiracy Files: Putin, The FBI and Donald Trump - the fifth estate
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An ugly and controversial U.S. election campaign got even uglier – and more bizarre – after the election was over. In recent days, Donald Trump has faced a storm of questions about his Russian connections. Meanwhile, the FBI is also taking incoming fire over how it publicly handled the Clinton email affair – while remaining silent about its probe of Trump’s Russian ties. In the wild final days of the campaign, it seemed as if the name of Vladimir Putin was heard almost as much as Trump or Clinton. On Inauguration Day January 20, The Fifth Estate’s Bob McKeown looks at what was behind the triumph of Trump – and the disturbing questions left unanswered.

Not domineering
While the perfect housewife was expected to work around her husband’s needs, women didn’t seek out domineering men. With that in mind, ladies would avoid a man who would crack the whip, so to speak. Instead, they wanted a more equal partnership, which was perhaps a sign that gender roles were already changing.

Fiona Hill: Trump used diplomats in Ukraine for a 'domestic political errand'
Yahoo News- JON WARD Nov 21st 2019


WASHINGTON — President Trump assigned numerous diplomats to carry out a “political errand” in Ukraine that diverged from national security concerns, a former senior Trump adviser said Thursday.

Fiona Hill, a Russia expert at the White House National Security Council until late July, detailed her frustration over the course of last spring and summer with Gordon Sondland, the U.S. ambassador to the European Union.
“I had a couple of testy encounters with him,” Hill told the House Intelligence Committee on Thursday in the fifth day of impeachment inquiry public hearings. “I was upset with him that he wasn’t fully telling us about all the meetings he was having.”
Sondland was part of a group of diplomats who worked with Trump’s personal lawyer Rudy Giuliani starting last spring to pressure Ukraine to announce investigations into a number of matters and people, including former Vice President Joe Biden. Sondland said in testimony Wednesday that he and others worked with Giuliani at the president’s instruction.
And Hill said that when she saw Sondland’s testimony, and in particular saw emails he had sent looping in Secretary of State Mike Pompeo, acting White House chief of staff Mick Mulvaney, and then-national security adviser John Bolton, she realized why he was not talking to her or others at the NSC about meetings he was having with Ukrainian government officials. 

“He was being involved in a domestic political errand, and we were being involved in national security, foreign policy,” Hill said. “I was irritated with him and angry with him … and I did say to him, ‘Gordon, I think this is all going to blow up.’”
“And here we are,” Hill added.
She also said Sondland’s “feeling was that the National Security Council was always trying to block him,” and she confirmed that it was.
“What we were trying to do is block us from straying into domestic or personal politics, and that was precisely what I was trying to do,” Hill said.

Sondland says Giuliani pushed for Ukraine quid pro quo
AP
LISA MASCARO, MARY CLARE JALONICK AND ERIC TUCKER
Nov 20th 2019


https://www.aol.com/article/news/2019/11/20/sondland-says-giuliani-pushed-for-ukraine-quid-pro-quo/23865101/

WASHINGTON (AP) — Ambassador Gordon Sondland told House impeachment investigators Wednesday that Rudy Giuliani had pushed a “quid pro quo” with Ukraine that he had to go along with because it’s what President Donald Trump wanted.
“Mr. Giuliani was expressing the desires of the president of the United States, and we knew that these investigations were important to the president,” Sondland said of his dealings with Trump’s personal attorney.

Sondland, the most highly anticipated witness in the public impeachment probe, made clear that he believed Trump was pursuing his desire for investigations in return for the Oval Office meeting that the Eastern European nation’s president sought. Sondland said he later came to believe military aid for Ukraine was also being held up until the investigations were launched.

“I know that members of this committee have frequently framed these complicated issues in the form of a simple question: Was there a ‘quid pro quo?’ As I testified previously, with regard to the requested White House call and White House meeting, the answer is yes,” he said.
The impeachment inquiry focuses significantly on allegations that Trump sought investigations of Democrat Joe Biden and his son — and the discredited idea that Ukraine rather than Russia interfered in the 2016 U.S. election — in return for the badly needed military aid as well as the White House visit.
Sondland, a wealthy hotelier and Trump donor, has emerged as a central figure in an intense week in the impeachment prone that has featured nine witnesses testifying over three days. Both Democrats and Republicans were uncertain about what Sondland would testify to, given that he had already clarified parts of his initial private deposition before lawmakers.

His opening statement included several key details. He confirmed that he spoke with Trump on a cellphone from a busy Kyiv restaurant the day after the president prodded Ukraine’s leader to investigate political rival Joe Biden. He also said he kept Secretary of State Mike Pompeo and other top administration officials aware of his dealings with Ukraine on the investigations Trump sought.
Sondland said he specifically told Vice President Mike Pence he “had concerns” that U.S. military aid to Ukraine “had become tied” to the investigations.

“Everyone was in the loop,” Sondland testified in opening remarks. “It was no secret.”
Sondland appeared prepared to fend off scrutiny over the way his testimony has shifted in closed-door settings, saying “my memory has not been perfect.” He said the State Department left him without access to emails, call records and other documents he needed in the inquiry.

Still, he did produce new emails and text messages to bolster his assertion that others in the administration were aware of the investigations he was pursuing for Trump from Ukraine.

Sondland insisted, twice, that he was “adamantly opposed to any suspension of aid” for Ukraine. “I was acting in good faith. As a presidential appointee, I followed the directions of the president.”
The son of immigrants who he said escaped Europe during the Holocaust, Sondland described himself as a “lifelong Republican” who has worked with officials from both parties, including Biden.

Democratic Intelligence Committee Chairman Adam Schiff of California opened the hearing saying, “The knowledge of this scheme was far and wide.
Schiff warned Pompeo and other administration officials who are refusing to turn over documents and testimony to the committee “they do so at their own peril.” He said obstruction of Congress was included in articles of impeachment during Watergate.
The top Republican on the committee, Devin Nunes of California, decried the inquiry and told the ambassador, "Mr. Sondland, you are here to be smeared."

Nunes renewed his demand to hear from the still-anonymous whistleblower whose complaint about Trump’s July 25 phone call with Ukraine President Volodymyr Zelenskiy led the House to open the impeachment inquiry.
____
Associated Press writer Colleen Long in Washington contributed to this report.

Generous
While raising a family on one income may seem like a stretch in this day and age, women didn’t expect men to keep a tight hold of their wallets. In fact, stinginess was considered an very unattractive attribute in a husband. Consequently, the perfect man of the 1950s would have been generous with his cash.

McCarthy: Schiff has made impeachment inquiry all about him
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  Ahead of the first public impeachment hearings, Republican House Minority Leader Rep. Kevin McCarthy sounds off on 'Fox & Friends' on what he says is a lack of due process for President Trump. #FoxNews  

Dwight Eisenhower
Another political figure women believed was good husband material in the 1950s was Dwight Eisenhower. The 34th President of the United States took office at the start of 1953 and would remain in power for the rest of the decade. A former Army general, he was responsible for the successful invasions in North Africa and Normandy during World War Two. And as president, he helped to bring peace to Korea.

Independent
For women of the 1950s, a husband who could stand on their own two feet was highly sought after. While she was most likely expected to cook and for him, a girl valued a man with independence. Perhaps if the man of the house could think for himself it was one less thing for the woman to think about.